One Of Those Bad Backing Days

Topic 28332 | Page 1

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John L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey y’all, still a rookie here, been driving for 6 months, 2 months with a trainer and 4 solo. Anyways today I was backing into a garage dock, super tight place with pallets everywhere, been there quite a few times and could easily back in. However, today was just a blank backing day, I didn’t pay attention to my driver side and the trailer got stuck and scraped against the pole/wall. Tried a few methods before I could pull myself out, mind you, I was already inside the garage dock. It occurred when I was pulling forward to straightening myself out. The situation taught me how to get out of risky situations. Anyways, left side trailer had yellow scraps and scratches but I decided not to report it to my company, also no one mentioned anything when they were loading my trailer lol so I just left it haha. Another driver from my company also had a blank moment a few years ago backing into the same enclosed dock but he damaged the wall and took out his trailer doors. The owner was super cool about it and said don’t worry about it wall! Man driving and backing in LA is the worst!

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

You should have reported it, what happens if the next driver takes that trailer and reports it damaged so they come looking for the last guy to pull it?

At OD you wouldn't be in trouble for the minor accident but definitely would be not reporting it.

John L.'s Comment
member avatar

You got a good point there! But the funny thing is that I know some drivers from my company who has done far worst damages to the trailer but never reported it. Like having a huge gash on the trailer, there was This one time 4 people from our company delivered to the same shipper and one of them didn’t pay attention and hit the other drivers trailer, it was damaged pretty bad but they both never reported it, the driver who got hit was like whatever it’s not my trailer. Both are still employed. I know where your coming from though, btw old dominion rocks! I heard they are an excellent company to work for.

You should have reported it, what happens if the next driver takes that trailer and reports it damaged so they come looking for the last guy to pull it?

At OD you wouldn't be in trouble for the minor accident but definitely would be not reporting it.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

John you are very new to this career. What other people do will not generally effect you. What you do will. You made a simple mistake. Companies that hire new drivers know these things will happen. The office staff knows who pulls what trailers. It can be traced back to you if they so choose. Like Bobcat said the failure to report will be the bigger issue.

Never never never listen to a customer in a situation like this. The person who told you no problem likely doesn’t have any authority within the company. If his boss finds out and doesn’t agree guess what. That customer calls your company and things go downhill from there.

I’ll share this with you. There are a couple customers I go to pretty regular. I have got to know the employees fairly well. They have shared with me that they have actually banned a certain carrier from their property because the drivers from that company have hit things too many times. They didn’t ban a driver or two, they banned the company, and it is not a small carrier. We never know what goes on behind the scenes with customers.

Things can and will happen. Follow your company policy and you will generally come out of it ok. Honesty is always the best policy.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

John L.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the advice PJ! I just don’t know what happened, I delivered there countless times and I get in no problem, but yesterday was my first time getting the trailer stuck on the wall, there were pallets on my blindside and I was too focused on that side that I failed to notice my driver side. The story of the customer saying don’t worry about it is actually not for me, that pertains to another driver from my company that tore his trailer doors down and hit the wall. The funny thing with my situation was that no one said anything, once I got “unstuck” if that makes sense lol they just proceeded to unload me and said what happened man?! I told them it’s one of those sucky days haha!

John you are very new to this career. What other people do will not generally effect you. What you do will. You made a simple mistake. Companies that hire new drivers know these things will happen. The office staff knows who pulls what trailers. It can be traced back to you if they so choose. Like Bobcat said the failure to report will be the bigger issue.

Never never never listen to a customer in a situation like this. The person who told you no problem likely doesn’t have any authority within the company. If his boss finds out and doesn’t agree guess what. That customer calls your company and things go downhill from there.

I’ll share this with you. There are a couple customers I go to pretty regular. I have got to know the employees fairly well. They have shared with me that they have actually banned a certain carrier from their property because the drivers from that company have hit things too many times. They didn’t ban a driver or two, they banned the company, and it is not a small carrier. We never know what goes on behind the scenes with customers.

Things can and will happen. Follow your company policy and you will generally come out of it ok. Honesty is always the best policy.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

You need to report every incident whether its significant damage or not. It all boils down to professionalism and doing what's right. Most employers likely wouldn't make it into a huge deal if theres very minimal damage. My employer requires us to document any time we have an incident regardless of damage. Failure to do so may result in immediate termination. The reason is that just because you don't see any damage doesnt mean that there isn't a hidden issue. It also is bad for your companies image and customer service to be damaging property. Just because it was previously ok doesnt mean it still is. Were you there to witness the incident with the other driver? Have they changed management? New ownership? There are many different factors that may have changed that the customer would now pursue a claim against your carrier. Also what PJ mentioned about a carrier not being allowed there is also possible. If your actions cause your employer to lose a customer it wouldn't be good for you.

As a truck driver we have extremely minimal supervision in comparison to most careers. We need to be trusted to do our job professionally when nobody is watching. Mistakes happen, but what you do after you goof up is what defines you. I'm not saying this applies to you, but IF you're an underperforming driver and the company is looking for a way to get rid of you not reporting a minor incident is a great way for that to happen. If they put failure to report accident or terminated for breaking company policy on your DAC it will be much more difficult to get another driving job. I highly encourage you to report every incident that happens. We don't own the equipment or property we bump into therefore our opinion of it being a small dent or scratch is no big deal. There are also legal ramifications if the owner of the property you hit decides to pursue it. Leaving the scene of an accident and hit and run are not likely to be pursued in this incident but both of those if convicted result in loss of your CDL and likely driving career

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I don't see anything funny about running into anything, John. Then you don't report it, either? There is no excuse for either.

You are "That Guy".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I don't see anything funny about running into anything, John. Then you don't report it, either? There is no excuse for either.

You are "That Guy".

That “Guy” who failed to report damaging company equipment, failed to G.O.A.L. in a tight spit and has yet to offer what lessons(s) were learned.

Yup...that “Guy”.

John L.'s Comment
member avatar

Yup, I’m that “rookie” guy.

double-quotes-start.png

I don't see anything funny about running into anything, John. Then you don't report it, either? There is no excuse for either.

You are "That Guy".

double-quotes-end.png

That “Guy” who failed to report damaging company equipment, failed to G.O.A.L. in a tight spit and has yet to offer what lessons(s) were learned.

Yup...that “Guy”.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Hey John...do you really want honest input?

Cause...professionalism and integrity have nothing to do with being a rookie.

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