Prime Inc. PSD Covid Edition

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the update! Many members here over the years have said that their first load after upgrading has enough time to allow you to swing by the house. Hopefully its the same for you. This would allow you to stock your truck and take a quick breather. Trucking companies deal with a juggling act when it comes to hometime. They need to allow drivers to be home when they want/need for driver happiness but also want you to stay out longer so they have more options of loads to send you. I look forward to hearing how the rest of your training goes.

Wiky Wiky's Comment
member avatar

Yea the simulators were mainly to teach people how to shift and double clutch , prime only had 10 speed manuals until 2017. I actually did get sent back home because my medication release wasn’t worded the correct way and came back a month later, so yes make double triple quadruple quintuple sure all you’re ducks are in a row before you ride a bus from Seattle to Springfield. I seen a guy almost get sent home because they found an expunged juvenile record and several people get sent home for various reasons, mostly undisclosed driving/criminal records so for sure don’t lie they are very good at finding things out.

Alright so day five, I do the same deal of waiting around pretripping that morning at the plaza building until I get a trainer. Something to note as well, nobody told me this but when you pass the Sim test and get a new schedule for pretrip class, the place you are going is the basement classroom in the plaza building. Pretty early in the morning my guy calls me, says he'll be there in a few minutes and when he shows up, we bs for a few minutes and he says meet him the next day to do some backing and driving. Rest of the day is free to goof off.

Nothing much goes on at this point. I decide to walk to the subway in Walmart but they're out of what I want so I say it isn't a bad idea to just walk around to avoid cabin fever. I walked to the long johns up the street and tried calling because if the Covid stuff but they just hang up when you call so I try the Burger King and it looked abandoned the closer I got so I got McDonald's instead. After spending about an hour walking around, I'll suggest you try not to look too unsuspecting, I had a few bums ask me for money or some of my food but didn't get any issues when I told them no.

And that pretty much sums up orientation. Pretty well painless all things considered but I'd recommend being a little assertive with your recruiter to try and ensure all is truly taken care of and you'll be ready to go. I'd have been pretty ****ed if they just wrote me off as lying on my application or being a headache and sent me packing for another 450 dollars rental and another 12 shot back home. But luckily that didn't happen and everything seems to exceed expectations here at prime so far.

The very limited class time, Sim time, and the handful of CBT's are nice for me since I don't have to go over a million basics that I've already been through and done. I'd be far more apprehensive if I didn't have prior experience though. Jumping in a truck for me is par for the course, this is just a different job with a ton of new smaller things like starting with any kind of new vocational truck, freight, or job. I'd imagine PSD might last a week or two longer for your average student since there is such a brief intro period. Within 4 days most that come here are in a 75 foot rig and moving it around no matter what your experience is. It is definitely something to consider. I don't know if this is always how it has been but I'm sure the 5 or so hours in a classroom and Sim is probably a new thing. Then again, you can't scribble on a chalkboard how to drive, it is seat time.

One final note I've observed about orientation, don't even bother speaking about your driving experience or past driving jobs of how you did this, that, or the other somewhere else unless it is to a recruiter or your PSD trainer. You're just going to **** off the teachers. Made that mistake. And don't get me wrong, I didn't act ****y or anything I just talked about how I did my pretrip when I had to do it while making small talk to another student and it got shot down pretty fast lol. I made brief mention of the automatic restriction situation and I think that might have been taken wrong as well and they might have inferred I was just going to cut and run once I got my fill class a license which isn't the case.

I'm young and only drove for a few years so far and not going to act like a know it all and I have definitely learned just to stay quiet and sit back and watch everyone else but even stuff that seems harmless to you can be taken the wrong way. I'm sure they've seen a lot of young kids waltz in with a lot of talk and no skilld but take my advice, keep your head down and pretend to know nothing. The orientation folks are friendly enough up front but there are certain ones that seem easy to offend or annoy.

I'll do a post once I finish out PSD, so far that side of things is going fantastic. Glad to be driving again, and coming from the mom n pop grading company deal, the dump trucks and the solid waste world, prime trucks are like Cadillacs. Big and SLOW Cadillacs but nonetheless, eh?

I don't know if you guys knew this or not but apparently big trucks can be equipped with this magical thing called air conditioning. It is the best thing since sliced bread.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Stoug Danhope's Comment
member avatar

Welp I've been sitting around various truck stops for about 3 days and bored out of my mind so a small update I suppose.

Been at it about 5 weeks total and have accumulated about 17500 miles. My backing isn't amazing for tight spots but I can get it in without breaking someone's mirror or asking for help. It's just slow to do. Still adjusting to not having your axles all the way at the rear on long trailers. Also my trainers truck isn't adjusted to where you can use your blindspot or hood mirrors for backing which is croppling for me personally. But oh well, I also miss day cabs for backing lol. Other than that and winter driving I could definitely go solo now. Hindsight being 20/20 I'd take a pay cut to have the training wrap up faster having drove as a day job before. 50k team miles when you get 3-4k a week is making it an absolute slog. Between sales, dispatch, and claims, we're getting nowhere fast. We had almost 6k one week but this week is shaping up to be maybe 2800 due to claims and finding buyers for damaged goods.

As far as training, well I've been shown how to do paperwork and macros and how to redeem shower credits but that is about as far as it goes. It's more about cheap labor for lease ops from what I've seen. After the first 2 weeks it's pretty much been the same thing day to day. At least on the reefer side there isn't much to the job, just get it there on time and follow the customers rules and send macros/paperwork. I'm not going to lie though, the job is pretty easy. The training is wearing on me though. I'm very solitary and a bit of a clean freak and don't like being around people for more than an hour or two. Team driving is being particularly brutal for me for a lot of reasons. I'd really like to take home time since it's been 3 or 4 weeks since last home time but my trainer committed me to finishing training without home time without asking me. I'm sure I could push the issue but he does petty stuff at times that messes with me like cutting off the air "accidentally" while I'm trying to sleep in the bunk. I'd rather not rock the boat since you're locked in a closet with someone you have to treat as the leader of the party. Not naive enough to think he can't make my life a complete living hell if I **** him off. But boy is it grating spending weeks around someone you really dislike without an escape but for showers. I talked with Rob D about jumping ship to flatbed because I'm really not keen on the lack of doing anything but sitting or sleeping that reefer offers but when I mentioned it to my trainer he had dispatch promise him that they'd make me finish training and then do tnt flatbed after 50k. Along with that it seems prime wants you to run 3-4 weeks after upgrading so getting home time around Thanksgiving if I stay reefer or next year with flatbed... I'll just stick to reefer. I'm far beyond wanting this "training" garbage done with.

I'm not trying to be overly negative but I'm not going to sugarcoat it either. The newness has worn off, we're getting no miles because my trainer is super picky about loads, and I really don't care for him. I've had tougher jobs before but this is probably the toughest challenge because there is no reprieve from it whatsoever, you can't relax or get away except for a shower which is like 30 minutes that only comes around every 4-6 days. I've also heard my trainer loosely mention that he may keep me longer than 50k miles. Apparently it is up to his discretion. I haven't said much when he mentions it but I will leave if they try and pull some BS like that. He's desperately trying to get me to drive a leased truck for him and also drive his truck when he takes 2 months of vacation next year. Either you're fine with me driving your truck solo or I need more training, guy. You don't get to say both. I find it hard not to laugh at the idea of leasing a truck and sending him 100-200 dollars a week for the privilege of being a part of his company. As if I was that stupid to fall for some **** like that lol. The lease guys here at prime have had more than their fair share of koolaid. I don't know how many guys I've talked to that "make" 200k+ a year leasing with prime. But I better get off the lease hater train, some people might take offence. Anyways...

I'll just say this, anyone that has decent sense, is antisocial, and has driven big trucks for a job before, be leery of committing to 50k miles. I'd do it over again differently in the present moment. I've seen some prime tnt students that clearly need 50k miles, probably more, and some that probably have no business ever driving big trucks. I started driving tractor trailers about 3 years ago but it was infrequent and without a cdl. I started driving dump trucks with and without pintle trailers about 2.5 years ago. I've had my class b cdl longer than my trainer has had his class a and drove illegally before that. Not trying to sound like a know it all or anything like that, just putting it out there for guys like me that know how to get around a bit in a tractor trailer but never drove legally. It's probably a rare situation to be in and I probably should have figured that for myself before joining up but I saw primes best equipment and pay apple dangling from their website and jumped at it. Maybe I'll be glad for it once I go solo but it's hard right now.

Anyways, that's all for now. Just some wisdom from my experiences so far so that someone might find it useful.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

I'm following, S.D.

My husband drove 'illegally' back in the day, too... so I'm not 'totally' unfamiliar w/ your situation. He had to get 'recertified' back in '03, and chose to go to Roadmasters to do so. He got a job with USX shortly thereafter, with a short spell of training back when they 'did' that.

Hang in there. IIRC Prime is the longest training company, currently; yet one of the best.

Wish you well, keep us posted~~

good-luck.gifgood-luck-2.gifgood-luck.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Stoug Danhope's Comment
member avatar

Yep I was driving for a local public works municipality so honestly, as long as nobody hurt anyone we could do nearly whatever we wanted. We had guys that couldn't pass the pretrip or written test on anything or drive manuals so they got an examiner to give them school bus licenses to drive on for their CDLs. No joke, we had one guy driving a hazmat fuel/lube truck after failing the cdl written test 9 times. I was one of only 5 people there that actually got a cdl the right way albeit class b. And it was a class b because insurance went up for them for class a drivers.

Funny how the government doesn't eat their own. We had guys pulling excavators sometimes with 1 single 3/8ths chain draped over the tracks between the slew ring, literally completely unsecured. We didn't even have to have dot med cards or anything like log books etc. Dot saw the government logo on the door and it was like we didn't even exist. Hell I personally was assigned to pulling a tandem dump truck with 18.5 ton in the bed of 87s so grossing almost 70k with a 963 cat behind it on a pintle trailer tilt deck. That poor dump truck was moving over 100k pounds with nothing but a 10 speed and a well worn cummins n14 to get it there lol.

God forbid if any of those guys get into a wreck, the lawyers will send em broke overnight. That's one reason I left that side of work. Getting 10-14 dollars an hour doing stuff like that is just senseless. I wouldn't doubt that the bosses would throw the driver under the bus in a situation like that.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

No... He can't keep you more than 50k miles unless you are unsafe have accidents tickets or critical events.

As for home time... It really isn't his decision. Message your FM--- NOT weekend or night dispatch but your FM with a date for home time.

No.... You don't have to run 4 weeks once solo. They will want 2 weeks solo before home time. So go home before you upgrade.

Nooooooo... 4 to 6 days without a shower is not acceptable and they must have given you numbers to call to switch trainers if you like.

Yes lease sucks which is why I don't do it. Labor day has indeed reduced miles.

yes lease ops try to get good students to stay on the truck or run a separate truck.

Yes going solo can be totally worth it.

Yes you could switch to FB right now and finish your miles.

Yes if you wait they will want 30 days of FB TnT after your 50k reefer.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

Yep I was driving for a local public works municipality so honestly, as long as nobody hurt anyone we could do nearly whatever we wanted. We had guys that couldn't pass the pretrip or written test on anything or drive manuals so they got an examiner to give them school bus licenses to drive on for their CDLs. No joke, we had one guy driving a hazmat fuel/lube truck after failing the cdl written test 9 times. I was one of only 5 people there that actually got a cdl the right way albeit class b. And it was a class b because insurance went up for them for class a drivers.

Funny how the government doesn't eat their own. We had guys pulling excavators sometimes with 1 single 3/8ths chain draped over the tracks between the slew ring, literally completely unsecured. We didn't even have to have dot med cards or anything like log books etc. Dot saw the government logo on the door and it was like we didn't even exist. Hell I personally was assigned to pulling a tandem dump truck with 18.5 ton in the bed of 87s so grossing almost 70k with a 963 cat behind it on a pintle trailer tilt deck. That poor dump truck was moving over 100k pounds with nothing but a 10 speed and a well worn cummins n14 to get it there lol.

God forbid if any of those guys get into a wreck, the lawyers will send em broke overnight. That's one reason I left that side of work. Getting 10-14 dollars an hour doing stuff like that is just senseless. I wouldn't doubt that the bosses would throw the driver under the bus in a situation like that.

Wow... super similar~!!!!! Uncannily so. The husband of mine actually 'needed' that refresher in '03 that I helped him study for. He had a 'bite the bullet' time, as well. He had felt like 'he' could've TAUGHT the school . . . IIRC. BUT for the pretrip, and the new regs. Here's the way his went:

My husband 'inherited' his dad's refuse/trash company, as a 'younger' lad. (I just read your post out loud, to the hubby, ..and he said 'YEP sounds like me~!') << So true. He WAS his own boss AND bus, per se.. but for his dad, until he passed. He did some H/H on the side, also. WOW.

Life was more 'lenient' in the 90's, and early 2k, so I've heard. I didn't meet hubby until almost 2000, but.. man, he had similar stuff as you to share! No endorsements, either. Had to 'do it all.'

Wish you well, man. Hang in.

good-luck.gifsorry.gifgood-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Stoug Danhope's Comment
member avatar

No... He can't keep you more than 50k miles unless you are unsafe have accidents tickets or critical events.

As for home time... It really isn't his decision. Message your FM--- NOT weekend or night dispatch but your FM with a date for home time.

No.... You don't have to run 4 weeks once solo. They will want 2 weeks solo before home time. So go home before you upgrade.

Nooooooo... 4 to 6 days without a shower is not acceptable and they must have given you numbers to call to switch trainers if you like.

Yes lease sucks which is why I don't do it. Labor day has indeed reduced miles.

yes lease ops try to get good students to stay on the truck or run a separate truck.

Yes going solo can be totally worth it.

Yes you could switch to FB right now and finish your miles.

Yes if you wait they will want 30 days of FB TnT after your 50k reefer.

Thanks for the straight facts on that stuff. Knowing that I'll probably see about going flatbed around 25-30k miles. Maybe get some home time worked out around 45k. I didn't get any phone numbers or really any policy on how all that stuff works through tnt, just going off shop talk and rumors pretty much. Just seemed to be knock it out and try not to make a scene through tnt. My trainer can tell some big ones but apparently there are some folks that really make tnt difficult or don't understand what otr trucking is like. I don't know where my trainer ranks as far as difficulty and I've somewhat adjusted to being with him, as much as I can but for all I know I could swap and it be to someone far worse. Hence why I've been hesitant. I haven't rocked the boat any or even talked to dispatch aside from forgetting a macro 25 once lol. I've got some stuff to take care of from my old side business I no longer run that would be waiting at home and getting home time would be nice to finish that up too but the paperwork won't be ready for another 2 weeks. Should line up good if I can make it work out to where flatbed tnt finished about 30 days and at 50k simultaneously. I'd need to get boots and winter clothes too, I was worried I'd have to go to Thanksgiving with only a hoodie as well lol.

The full size truck in flatbedding is what is a major factor, that and the endless downtime and weird hours of reefer. I also sleep like a rock and have a hard time waking up to shipper/receiver calls. God forbid they say they'll text me. I need a deafening alarm to stir me from slumber.

Just wondering if at the end of the day if lightweight reefer and flatbed are a big difference in pay or not.

double-quotes-end.png

Wow... super similar~!!!!! Uncannily so. The husband of mine actually 'needed' that refresher in '03 that I helped him study for. He had a 'bite the bullet' time, as well. He had felt like 'he' could've TAUGHT the school . . . IIRC. BUT for the pretrip, and the new regs. Here's the way his went:

My husband 'inherited' his dad's refuse/trash company, as a 'younger' lad. (I just read your post out loud, to the hubby, ..and he said 'YEP sounds like me~!') << So true. He WAS his own boss AND bus, per se.. but for his dad, until he passed. He did some H/H on the side, also. WOW.

Life was more 'lenient' in the 90's, and early 2k, so I've heard. I didn't meet hubby until almost 2000, but.. man, he had similar stuff as you to share! No endorsements, either. Had to 'do it all.'

Wish you well, man. Hang in.

good-luck.gifsorry.gifgood-luck.gif

Oh yeah I've done the local trash route deal. Won't ever do that again. Trash men are a different breed of people. I remember having to tarp the back of roll off compactors with a weeks worth of garbage juice pouring out in front of you. Of all the trucks I've drove, roll offs scare me the most. That and parking next to dumping frameless end dumps at the quarry. Never could get used to pulling roll off cans onto the truck inside the cab. Outside was fine because I could see everything. Inside is nerve wracking lol. I wouldn't trade all that experience though. I was eager to learn and government workers are glad to pass off the seat time to someone else who is willing.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Give your FM 2 weeks notice for home time. That way they can't say they didn't have notice to get you home. Rob Dcan answer your LW vs flatbed pay. I am not sure. Remember once you finish the miles to get on your FM to get you signed up for a truck. Once they have one.... About 3 to 6 days wait.... They will bring you in for more classes. Then you inspect the truck and get any repairs or modifications done. Then you will need to get your securement equipment. Understand you buy the tarps and straps yourself that they break into payments. Then get your load and go!!! We will be here for you as you move along. Keep truckin along.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Stoug Danhope's Comment
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Give your FM 2 weeks notice for home time. That way they can't say they didn't have notice to get you home. Rob Dcan answer your LW vs flatbed pay. I am not sure. Remember once you finish the miles to get on your FM to get you signed up for a truck. Once they have one.... About 3 to 6 days wait.... They will bring you in for more classes. Then you inspect the truck and get any repairs or modifications done. Then you will need to get your securement equipment. Understand you buy the tarps and straps yourself that they break into payments. Then get your load and go!!! We will be here for you as you move along. Keep truckin along.

Just out of curiosity, how long does it take for a tnt student to jump ship to another division? I requested it Tuesday and it is Friday now and haven't heard anything about it other than the initial, "we'll look for a flatbed trainer." I'm going to check up Monday again when the main FM is back in but I'm a bit of a paranoid person. I don't remember if I mentioned it but I mentioned it to my tnt trainer in passing a few weeks ago and immediately he told our FM about it but I didn't know what he told them. Of course QC messages are returned to the both of us on the truck and the FM stated he'd keep me on the truck until training was over and then go to flatbed. Just wondering if I'm being jerked around or if I should be watching for my trainers FM to drag his feet. Just for reference we've been dispatched on 3 loads since the notification and are booked out until late Monday. Not to brag or anything but I've been rather painless for everyone and I keep my head down and don't complain about a lot of stuff I certainly could be *****ing about. I run my miles safely and keep to myself. I know it isn't an immediate thing but just asking if you or anyone else has input. If they force me to stay out until I'm at like 40-45k then do 30 days flatbed; I'd rather just take the paycut and interrupted hours of reefer. On the positive side, dispatch seems to have lifted the curse on us. Last week I got 3 34 hour resets in but we're finally moving good and likely to get about 4500 miles this week.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

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