Gps

Topic 28533 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Go into Prime in the reefer division and learn how to handle the truck and the job. You are very correct tankers are a whole different animal. You need to learn the basics and refine your skills before you jump into that.

I pull tankers and love it. I had several years experience driving before I did it, and it was and still is a challenge. You have to learn to be very smooth with your driving. Prime is all food grade tanker work, which is a bit different than chemicals, but the same principles apply. Their tanker division will always be looking for drivers.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I was hoping you would make an appearance on this, PJ!

Kj Bryant's Comment
member avatar

Go into Prime in the reefer division and learn how to handle the truck and the job. You are very correct tankers are a whole different animal. You need to learn the basics and refine your skills before you jump into that.

I pull tankers and love it. I had several years experience driving before I did it, and it was and still is a challenge. You have to learn to be very smooth with your driving. Prime is all food grade tanker work, which is a bit different than chemicals, but the same principles apply. Their tanker division will always be looking for drivers.

Thank you all very much I really enjoy this forum. You guys are polite and courteously honest. I know being new I got hard work ahead of me but hard work refines you.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PJ's Comment
member avatar
I was hoping you would make an appearance on this, PJ!

Yes sir

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

So the betterment of my career run reefer (which is my real first choice) Learn and get experience, then if I am personally comfortable go tanker? I'm open for advise not meaning to ask dumb questions, just want to pick your guys brain alittle. It's just i read there is lots of good tanker frieght in my area. But I know tanker is a whole diffrent monster than other divisions, having to do with dealing with the shift in weight while maneuvering.

My two cents.

If freight volume is a factor flatbed is always higher industry wide and you have more freight variety. We're hauling onions right now.

But I think you will have enough to haul no matter what you haul.

Plus, flatbedders are cooler than other drivers, except PJ, who drives a long nose Pete named Gunsmoke.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Plus, flatbedders are cooler than other drivers, except PJ, who drives a long nose Pete named Gunsmoke.

rofl-3.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-3.gif

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So the betterment of my career run reefer (which is my real first choice) Learn and get experience, then if I am personally comfortable go tanker? I'm open for advise not meaning to ask dumb questions, just want to pick your guys brain alittle. It's just i read there is lots of good tanker frieght in my area. But I know tanker is a whole diffrent monster than other divisions, having to do with dealing with the shift in weight while maneuvering.

double-quotes-end.png

My two cents.

If freight volume is a factor flatbed is always higher industry wide and you have more freight variety. We're hauling onions right now.

But I think you will have enough to haul no matter what you haul.

Plus, flatbedders are cooler than other drivers, except PJ, who drives a long nose Pete named Gunsmoke.

Really?

I'll remember that remark the next time you call with a problem.

confused.gifrofl-3.gifgood-luck.gif

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Kj Bryant's Comment
member avatar

I think I'm getting alittle ahead if myself don't even have my cdl in my hands yet lol. One thing at a time. Im not going to be another trucking school statistc lol. I have been in the passenger side of a truck never drove one.

Question whats the best way when your new if your alittle nervous to quell the nerves. Im thinking the more time behind the wheel, and as long as im paying attention it will get better.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Question whats the best way when your new if your alittle nervous to quell the nerves. Im thinking the more time behind the wheel, and as long as im paying attention it will get better.

There's nothing wrong with being a little nervous. You should be a little nervous. I got more nervous as I progressed through my schooling and my training. I was never more nervous and more relieved (if that makes sense) as when I finally got my own truck and was a solo rookie driver.

Those nerves will help you remain vigilant and on guard. You are never more dangerous as when you grow complacent. Harness that nervousness and let it help you develop good safety habits. It will ease up as you become more proficient, but you should also have developed good safety habits during that time period.

A nervous rookie is a good thing. Overconfident rookies are scary. Embrace your nervousness and let it teach you how to operate your rig safely. Those overwhelming feelings of nervousness will fade as you progress.

This may surprise you. I'm a very confident trucker, but I still drive like an 80 year old granny who is afraid she's about to crash. I stay safe that way. Although you'll often find me teaching people how to maximize their miles and pay in here, you have to realize you can never accomplish those goals without safety being your foremost concern.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

KJ I too was worried about the little things and still do. I also wondered about a GPS, even got myself a Rand McNally TND 740 with my first paycheck. Best way to quell the nerves is to get out and do it, the more I did it the better I got, I've been driving almost 3 years now and really only get nervous if something strange comes up.

Plus, flatbedders are cooler than other drivers

I though day cabbers where? especially the ones with the single axle truck.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More