Tank Trailers Get Approved For An Additional Pulsating Brake Light

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DaveW's Comment
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Responding to the National Tank Truck Carriers Inc's application for approval to add a pulsating amber or red brake light to rear of tank trucks in addition to the steady-burning regular brake light, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has granted a 5-year exemption beginning October 8.

Tank trailers get approved for an additional pulsating brake light

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Mikey B.'s Comment
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Who'd ever imagine one would have to get approval for a safety feature. The government and DOT really do suck sometimes.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
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Responding to the National Tank Truck Carriers Inc's application for approval to add a pulsating amber or red brake light to rear of tank trucks in addition to the steady-burning regular brake light, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has granted a 5-year exemption beginning October 8.

Tank trailers get approved for an additional pulsating brake light

Interesting article, for sure. We used to pull trailers . . . hmmm. Not Groens, but Etnyres, yet, .. no matter. I'd have been all for it, as we were night haulers of asphalt.

Just wondering, y'all : What say YOU, PJ ? Other tanker yankers ? andhe78 ?

Did this woman have anything to do with this 'addition?' (Or is it just koinkydink?) ;) << Love that word, sorry!

More Lights on Tankers .. Petition

Thanks again, for another great article, DaveW. ~!! Another one you beat ME to, haha!!

Be safe, drivers.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PJ's Comment
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I guess Time DC is already in good shape with all the lights they have. I’m for anything that will make all of us safer.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
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I guess Time DC is already in good shape with all the lights they have. I’m for anything that will make all of us safer.

Amen, good sir. Wondered your thoughts.

Thanks~!!

Anne :)

andhe78's Comment
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Honest opinion? Lack of lights is less of a problem than distracted driving (cellphone). The last batch of gas trailers my company bought are garishly lit up. No joke, I can pick out one of our rigs a mile away in the dark, that’s how ridiculous they are. Yet I’ve personally had two instances this past year pulling into a station with one of these trailers and having a four wheeler go careening off the road because they “didn’t see me until too late.” The second time was even with my flashers and side work light on to hopefully be more noticeable.

More lights are fine, yet I watched someone today pass a stopped school bus with all it’s flashing lights.

This is going to sound really dumb, but reading Anne’s article and the line about lights illuminating the entire outline of the trailer-we’ve got a “ring of fire” we call it, illuminating the rear outline of our new tanks, and some drivers are starting to worry about it because the pretty lights seem to draw drivers in like a moth to a flame. It gets weird out here at night.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
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Honest opinion? Lack of lights is less of a problem than distracted driving (cellphone). The last batch of gas trailers my company bought are garishly lit up. No joke, I can pick out one of our rigs a mile away in the dark, that’s how ridiculous they are. Yet I’ve personally had two instances this past year pulling into a station with one of these trailers and having a four wheeler go careening off the road because they “didn’t see me until too late.” The second time was even with my flashers and side work light on to hopefully be more noticeable.

More lights are fine, yet I watched someone today pass a stopped school bus with all it’s flashing lights.

This is going to sound really dumb, but reading Anne’s article and the line about lights illuminating the entire outline of the trailer-we’ve got a “ring of fire” we call it, illuminating the rear outline of our new tanks, and some drivers are starting to worry about it because the pretty lights seem to draw drivers in like a moth to a flame. It gets weird out here at night.

Thanks for your reply, andhe78 ... I always appreciate your input.

No, it actually 'doesn't' sound dumb, and I actually agree that the 'chicken lights and chrome' effect, DOES draw in the 'curious.' We had the minimal lights on the tanks we pulled, by law, at night . . . and never had an issue. Then again, that was 6 years ago. Anymore, it seems like a double edged sword. (Personally, 'i' would even get drawn in to those 'purty lights' while sitting IN the rig..)

You are out there in it still, at night.

The school bus thing: there was something on the news here in Ohio, a while back....and a FIVE OH (SORRY PJ) passed a school bus picking up kids, pre dawn, with all the lights a roiling.

The 'backing/stopping beacon' may not be a bad idea; but that woman's idea (RIP to her family) I kinda doubt would help, if not hinder.

Thanks, guys!

~ Anne ~

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Navypoppop's Comment
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I for one would agree that this is an excellent idea even for all trailers or large vehicles. The issue at hand is the lack of concentration of some drivers while behind the wheel. Things like talking or texting on the cell phone, drinking or eating behind the wheel while driving and always in a hurry.

If these drivers took the time to park, then they could enjoy their McD lunch, talk to your friends and drive slower so you would arrive alive and be a safer more considerate driver and not a statistic.

andhe78's Comment
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I’m not poo-pooing more lights. While I’ve had two people not notice them, I’m sure others have and were warned. I know our brakes come on with our jakes and that keeps people off our rears a lot. There’s just a segment of the population that will not notice any type of light show in front of them. Also, night, city drivers see a ton less traffic, but what little traffic we do see is much more likely to be impaired.

PJ's Comment
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No matter what is done there will always be a certain segment of stupid motorists.

Many years ago now I buried a sgt buddy of mine. A cotton trailer in the middle of nowhere was turning across the highway at 0300 in the morning. He never saw it and struck it broadside.

Some more lights on the sides of all trailers would be benificial. As far as the brake warning lights I think it is a good idea. Groen**** has been running them since 2015 and it has reduced the amount of rear end collisions to their trailers. Flashing lights no matter the color are attention getters but also distracting because of the flash. It is a double edge sword.

What I found very stupid was Groen**** had some DOT officers actually citing them for having this device. Common sense should apply, but it some cases is very lacking. Once in MS I was going through a scale house at 0400 and was put down the bypass lane. I knew my weight was good and then the park arrow came on. I parked and went inside to see what they wanted. The young officer behind the desk was very rude and got all over me for having blue lights in my air breathers. He was telling me the law and how he felt I was impersonating a police vehicle. That was all he wanted. He asked why they were blue and I told him because I retired from LE and handed him my retired ID and his sgt looking over his shoulder shook his head no to him and the young man just asked me to turn them off. I have run them for over 2 years and he was the only person to ever say a word. I’ve been inspected 2 times with them on and nothing said. Case of a young new officer flexing his authority. It happens sometimes.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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