Question From A 4 Wheeler

Topic 29139 | Page 1

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VA 4 wheeler 's Comment
member avatar

Most trucks on the road are being driven safely — for sure. But every now and then, I see what looks like unsafe driving. Specifically: tailgating a 4 wheeler, often in left lane; or driving at 80 mph +.

My question: is there anything I should do? Who to contact?

I am talking about very obvious risky driving.

Also for all truckers: there is a highly dangerous curve on the DC beltway 495 heading westbound at the junction with 270 south. About 1 crash ** every week ** how is this possible that the industry is unaware of this danger. And of course, each crash generates traffic jams sometimes epic traffic jams.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Going 80+ is most likely an owner op. I don't think there is any one you can contact. Most trucks owned by corporations are governed at somewhere between 62 and 70 MPH.

As for the bend in DC, I've never been there so I don't know anything about it but as you become more familiar with areas, you learn the dangers and how to mitigate them. Experience is the only teacher there. Dispatchers aren't familiar with routes we take and it's impossible to know about every dangerous curve. That's why you have to pay attention to your surroundings and read the signs. Are there any signs warning about the curve and the speed before the curve?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

If you were in the left lane and the truck is behind you then you are impeding the flow of traffic. It does not matter what the speed limit is. It’s the police job to enforce the law , not civilians. So if they’re trying to get by you just move over. There is a reason that states like Florida are now ticketing people in the left lanes for impeding the flow of traffic.

Singular rate of speed does not hurt people or create risk(within reason). Differential rate of speed does.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been known (in my personal vehicle) to "impede" traffic by doing the speed limit (70) while passing a long line of trucks doing 65. I disagree with your arguement Dan if I interpreted correctly. Are you implying that a truck has the right to be within feet of a vehicles bumper to bully them to moving over?

I'm not ashamed to admit I've called other companies about their unsafe behavior. Example, I called a mega carrier in last month for not maintaining their lane while speeding 10+ through an active construction zone. I've also called 911 watching a truck weave all over the road nearly going into the ditch in the middle of the night.

I'm not out here to get drivers in trouble or ruin their livelihoods but I have absolutely zero respect for those engaging in such unsafe behavior. Call me a snitch or what have you, I don't care.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Dan I have to disagree 100% with everything you said.

Funny how a owner opp says that tho.

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Get the dot# off the truck along with the truck or trailer number.

Look up their company by using the safer website. You can find it by googling dot lookup.

Call their number and ask to speak to ther owner or the safety department.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

No I’m not saying it’s right to crawl up somebody’s ass, what I’m saying is it is not a persons job to intentionally block traffic in the left lane. I see it all the time speed limit 70 in a car doing 65 moves into the left lane and then gets right next to a truck and just sits there blocking traffic.

I've been known (in my personal vehicle) to "impede" traffic by doing the speed limit (70) while passing a long line of trucks doing 65. I disagree with your arguement Dan if I interpreted correctly. Are you implying that a truck has the right to be within feet of a vehicles bumper to bully them to moving over?

I'm not ashamed to admit I've called other companies about their unsafe behavior. Example, I called a mega carrier in last month for not maintaining their lane while speeding 10+ through an active construction zone. I've also called 911 watching a truck weave all over the road nearly going into the ditch in the middle of the night.

I'm not out here to get drivers in trouble or ruin their livelihoods but I have absolutely zero respect for those engaging in such unsafe behavior. Call me a snitch or what have you, I don't care.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

If you were in the left lane and the truck is behind you then you are impeding the flow of traffic. It does not matter what the speed limit is. It’s the police job to enforce the law , not civilians. So if they’re trying to get by you just move over. There is a reason that states like Florida are now ticketing people in the left lanes for impeding the flow of traffic.

Singular rate of speed does not hurt people or create risk(within reason). Differential rate of speed does.

Sorry Dan -but there is NOTHING IN FLORIDA LAW - that says you can VIOLATE THE SPEED LIMIT and people who are OBEYING THE SPEED LIMIT can be cited for "impeding traffic".

Not really sure where you get this from.

NOW - typically (and it varies from state to state) you are "impeding traffic" if you are going 15 miles OR LESS - BELOW the posted speed limit. Some states even post the Min/Max speeds on a limited access highway.

This still doesn't excuse truckers from acting like they are on a NASCAR track and are trying to "draft" the car in front of them. 1 "car length", behind a 4 wheeler @ 60MPH. Tailgating like this - is considered a "serious offense" that can get a CDL SUSPENDED. And I see it ALL THE TIME around here.

Likewise - while we of little patience would PREFER that people in the left lane not do 65 in a 70 - it is NOT ILLEGAL, just DISCOURTEOUS. It is also not "impeding traffic".

Fl Statute 316.183 (2) "...The minimum speed limit on all highways that comprise a part of the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways and have not fewer than four lanes is 40 miles per hour, except that when the posted speed limit is 70 miles per hour, the minimum speed limit is 50 miles per hour."

So - even if the person was doing 55 in a 70 - they are still legal (even if you want to crush their skull).

Fl Statute 316.183 (5) No person shall drive a motor vehicle at such a slow speed as to impede or block the normal and reasonable movement of traffic, except when reduced speed is necessary for safe operation or in compliance with law.

And as long as they are adhering to 316.183(2) - they are "in compliance with the law".

Personally - I drive my POV at 9mph OVER on the interstate, since cops rarely waste their time grabbing anyone slower than 10 over (I also run a Valentine One and Laser Jammer, but I digress).

I have been known to call into FHP dispatch, and follow (obviously) drunk drivers until they get pulled. I've also called safety departments of companies, to report REALLY DANGEROUS operation of CMV's (and typically provide video when requested).

Commercial Vehicles operating dangerously (company or O/O) - give the ENTIRE INDUSTRY A BLACK EYE. And the public SOON FORGETS how important WE ARE (like every single thing, on every single shelf in their stores - GOT THERE ON A TRUCK), when they witness truckers driving like a-holes.

And we get that A LOT here in Ft Lauderdale - especially the guys hauling containers out of the port.

And I am not the most patient person in the world. I am quick on the flash high beams & horn, at someone going too slow in the hammer lane. But, my patience (or lack thereof) aside - me wanting to do 74 in a 65 - doesn't give me ANY MORE LEGAL RIGHTS to that lane - than the guy that does 65 in a 65.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

Actually, three years ago Florida instituted a slow poke law for the left lane.

And regardless of speed limit what I said is true it is not a person‘s responsibility to intentionally hold back traffic, that is the job of law-enforcement.

If you go over to I 75 near Ocalla you will see people getting pulled over on a regular basis especially heading southbound from Gainesville area by Florida Highway patrol.

I don’t usually head down to the area that you drive in so I’m not familiar with the issues in your local Waze area but I do know if the state did in fact make The slow poke law.. I don’t advocate for anybody to drive dangerously especially aggressive driving. I also do not advocate for anybody to pretend they are line Forssman and force others into a dangerous situation by pulling out in front of them at a slower speed than the person who is in the left lane is already going.

double-quotes-start.png

If you were in the left lane and the truck is behind you then you are impeding the flow of traffic. It does not matter what the speed limit is. It’s the police job to enforce the law , not civilians. So if they’re trying to get by you just move over. There is a reason that states like Florida are now ticketing people in the left lanes for impeding the flow of traffic.

Singular rate of speed does not hurt people or create risk(within reason). Differential rate of speed does.

double-quotes-end.png

Sorry Dan -but there is NOTHING IN FLORIDA LAW - that says you can VIOLATE THE SPEED LIMIT and people who are OBEYING THE SPEED LIMIT can be cited for "impeding traffic".

Not really sure where you get this from.

NOW - typically (and it varies from state to state) you are "impeding traffic" if you are going 15 miles OR LESS - BELOW the posted speed limit. Some states even post the Min/Max speeds on a limited access highway.

This still doesn't excuse truckers from acting like they are on a NASCAR track and are trying to "draft" the car in front of them. 1 "car length", behind a 4 wheeler @ 60MPH. Tailgating like this - is considered a "serious offense" that can get a CDL SUSPENDED. And I see it ALL THE TIME around here.

Likewise - while we of little patience would PREFER that people in the left lane not do 65 in a 70 - it is NOT ILLEGAL, just DISCOURTEOUS. It is also not "impeding traffic".

Fl Statute 316.183 (2) "...The minimum speed limit on all highways that comprise a part of the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways and have not fewer than four lanes is 40 miles per hour, except that when the posted speed limit is 70 miles per hour, the minimum speed limit is 50 miles per hour."

So - even if the person was doing 55 in a 70 - they are still legal (even if you want to crush their skull).

Fl Statute 316.183 (5) No person shall drive a motor vehicle at such a slow speed as to impede or block the normal and reasonable movement of traffic, except when reduced speed is necessary for safe operation or in compliance with law.

And as long as they are adhering to 316.183(2) - they are "in compliance with the law".

Personally - I drive my POV at 9mph OVER on the interstate, since cops rarely waste their time grabbing anyone slower than 10 over (I also run a Valentine One and Laser Jammer, but I digress).

I have been known to call into FHP dispatch, and follow (obviously) drunk drivers until they get pulled. I've also called safety departments of companies, to report REALLY DANGEROUS operation of CMV's (and typically provide video when requested).

Commercial Vehicles operating dangerously (company or O/O) - give the ENTIRE INDUSTRY A BLACK EYE. And the public SOON FORGETS how important WE ARE (like every single thing, on every single shelf in their stores - GOT THERE ON A TRUCK), when they witness truckers driving like a-holes.

And we get that A LOT here in Ft Lauderdale - especially the guys hauling containers out of the port.

And I am not the most patient person in the world. I am quick on the flash high beams & horn, at someone going too slow in the hammer lane. But, my patience (or lack thereof) aside - me wanting to do 74 in a 65 - doesn't give me ANY MORE LEGAL RIGHTS to that lane - than the guy that does 65 in a 65.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Actually, three years ago Florida instituted a slow poke law for the left lane.

And regardless of speed limit what I said is true it is not a person‘s responsibility to intentionally hold back traffic, that is the job of law-enforcement.

If you go over to I 75 near Ocalla you will see people getting pulled over on a regular basis especially heading southbound from Gainesville area by Florida Highway patrol.

I don’t usually head down to the area that you drive in so I’m not familiar with the issues in your local Waze area but I do know if the state did in fact make The slow poke law.. I don’t advocate for anybody to drive dangerously especially aggressive driving. I also do not advocate for anybody to pretend they are line Forssman and force others into a dangerous situation by pulling out in front of them at a slower speed than the person who is in the left lane is already going.

The OP wasn't talking about "slowpokes" - he was talking about truckers seemingly trying to "impose their will", by speeding and dangerously tailgating drivers.

The FL "slowpoke law" is actually 316.081(3) On a road, street, or highway having two or more lanes allowing movement in the same direction, a driver may not continue to operate a motor vehicle in the furthermost left-hand lane if the driver knows or reasonably should know that he or she is being overtaken in that lane from the rear by a motor vehicle traveling at a higher rate of speed. This subsection does not apply to drivers operating a vehicle that is overtaking another vehicle proceeding in the same direction, or is preparing for a left turn at an intersection.

But this STILL DOES NOT APPLY TO PEOPLE SPEEDING IN EXCESS OF POSTED LIMITS.

That being said - it's still dumb and discourteous for people to hog the left lane - when traffic is moving faster than them. I get it - up on 75, Ocala-way - people are doing 85/90. But the speed limit up there is still 70 (55-65, when you're in city limits). So if you're doing 70 - and a trucker is trying to "push you aside" - it's the truck that's going to get cited.

We can go round and round on this - but NO STATUTE - slowpoke law or otherwise - is going to authorize someone to exceed the posted speed.

It's a common principal (even a statute: Florida Statute 316.081) that vehicles shall stay to the right unless passing. When you're ALWAYS SPEEDING, you're ALWAYS PASSING (LOL).

Now we all know that folks haul butt on 75 up that way - pretty much NO ONE is doing the speed limit (certainly NOT ME - but I'm not driving a TT either). Back in my foolish days - when I had a Corvette (and before I got my CDL - when I learned to VALUE A CLEAN RECORD), I used to run that stretch, from the turnpike to the border, with my cruise set @ 95. I used to make the run to ATL & back - 2X a month when I was managing a band out of Stone Mountain. Pick up my bus in MacDonough, go out on tour for 3 weeks, drop the bus off, come home. I think my "best time" was 6.5 hours flat - ATL to FLL.

Now - I set my "adaptive cruise control" to 90 - set my following distance to max - and move with the flow of traffic in the left lane.

Yeah - there's always going to be some bozo that thinks "just doing the speed limit" in the left lane is fine (and LEGALLY - IT IS), but they're not breaking any laws by doing this (and I just messaged a retired FHP friend that laughed at me for even asking the question).

I see the dangerous tailgating occurring, in traffic - in EVERY LANE around here. Being that we're in an "urban zone" on 95, from Palm Beach to Miami, which, for the most part - is NO TRUCKS IN TWO LEFT LANE - there shouldn't even be any TT's in the hammer lane anyways.

All I'm trying to say is - REGARDLESS OF CIRCUMSTANCES - you'd have to be INSANE (and wholly unsafe) to not maintain a safe following distance - when you could literally eat some 4-wheeler for lunch. They can stop on a dime (or a quarter) if they have to. WE TAKE A FOOTBALL FIELD at highway speeds.

Just because there's some slowpoke law - it doesn't ever excuse unsafe behavior driving a rig. And again - stuff like this, is why the motoring public HATES US - and why juries are awarding MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR JUDGEMENTS, when the truck does end up eating a car, because they were following too closely.

That's the point I'm trying to make...

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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