Is Western Express A Good Place For A Rookie?

Topic 29209 | Page 2

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Mikey B.'s Comment
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They are a good place for several reasons. As a rookie with zero experience they are much more lenient with rookie mistakes and if needed will allow more incidents than many carriers. They run newer equipment and keep it maintained well. They will never tell you to keep on driving with broken equipment as they have no problem with paying for repairs. They give many drivers THE chance they need when MANY other companies wouldn't touch them with a 10 foot pole. They have plenty of loads and plenty of miles.

On the bad side, their pay is probably somewhere in the lowest 3 of the mega carriers, however, that doesn't mean you can't make good money with them. The more experience you get and the better/faster you learn to manage your clock the more miles you can run and the more you will make. There is no reason you couldn't make $40-$50k in a rookie year as long as you can turn the miles. The horror stories you hear are most often from those that couldn't hack it. Spend 8 hours of their 10 playing video games then expect to take another 8 to sleep continually delivering late then complain they aren't getting any miles.

Long story short, if its seat time you're looking for and you are limited to one company willing to take a chance on you by giving you that seat time, are you willing to take a chance on them? Yes, again, their pay could be a lot better but you will get all the miles YOU can handle. There will be bad weeks and good weeks with some really good weeks all together so if you can handle the lower pay per mile they are really a pretty good company. They have no more issues than any other company.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Zach 's Comment
member avatar

Got everything squared away with the recruiter, I leave on the 14th for orientation. Decided to do dry van so I can get more practice backing then I would if I was flatbed but I'll definetly consider giving flatbed a chance later on. I'll see y'all out there.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
DaveDiesel's Comment
member avatar
Got everything squared away with the recruiter, I leave on the 14th for orientation. Decided to do dry van s

That's great news! Congrats.

I think pulling drive vans, in the beginning, is a good idea. It allows you to really focus on driving skills and getting comfortable behind the wheel.

Stay motivated!

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Georgia Mike's Comment
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Make sure you bring money for food durring orientation.

Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Got everything squared away with the recruiter, I leave on the 14th for orientation. Decided to do dry van so I can get more practice backing then I would if I was flatbed but I'll definetly consider giving flatbed a chance later on. I'll see y'all out there.

Congrats, Zach~!

Extremely happy for you, good sir. Keep us in the loop~!!!

~ Anne ~

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

They gave me my start bro I’m averaging 2333 miles a week !!! Now! I’m telling you it’s gonna be up to you to be a self starter!! If you don’t have a lot of financial obligations dry van is a good way to go to get your experience they’ll run you !! You need to be vocal with your trainer and not let him just run teams with you!! Qaulcom com and background ng make it a point that he gets you know Ed up I didn’t and it’s but me in the a$$ mote than once !! Thank god for this sight and the great people on it 2 in particular have saved my bacon more than once and 3 more pointed me in the right direction to learn and give me an outline on what to do so don’t be afraid to post they will answer !! Pre trip always they will fix whatever is broke on your truck learn to pre plan an manage your clock truck stops at the end of your clock and run your clock !! Mike b and Georgia mike have been great pappa told me to make a cheat sheet for qaulcom pack rat and rob t told me how to slide my tandems yo the back to please the guards and the dc then slide em back to ca legal to dock it then slide them back again once I m done !! When you drop your trailer always double triple check landing gear glad hands and phone g tail make sure they’re disconnected and reverse when picking up trailer I pulled glad hands off on my first trailer I dropped flat bed pays better but runs harder if I can help I will just ask Jammer

Got everything squared away with the recruiter, I leave on the 14th for orientation. Decided to do dry van so I can get more practice backing then I would if I was flatbed but I'll definetly consider giving flatbed a chance later on. I'll see y'all out there.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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