MVR Record: License Suspended Twice For Underage Drinking While Not Operating A Vehicle

Topic 29326 | Page 1

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Mitch A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello,

I've just received my PA Class A CDL Learner's Permit and I will be getting all of the endorsements added in two weeks before I attend a private driving school.

Unfortunately, I have a juvenile record from almost ten years ago which is expunged however, the two underage's I received are on my ten year MVR report which were almost a decade ago. In PA before 2018, a minor would have their license suspended for 30-90 days the first offense and one year on the second offense. In 2011 when I was 17, I received a 60 day suspension on my a Class C drivers license before I even had one for being caught by the police for drinking. PA at the time had very strict laws regarding minors and drinking so I had a license suspension before I was even able to get a class c license.

My second underage drinking offense without driving was when I was 18 in 2012 and I had my license suspended for one year. These underage charges are not considered a misdemeanor or a felony.

I'm almost 27 now and the two violations I've had on my record in the last 5 years are is 10 mph over the limit in 2017 and for not fully stopping at a stop sign (rolling stop) last February.

I'm not proud of any of this and I own up to all of these mistakes. How badly will this affect me when it comes to getting my first job? Any information or advise will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

J.D.'s Comment
member avatar

I do a lot of research when I get into something big, and this career tops them all, so I've learned a lot since I got my CDL in the fall and have been looking for a "right" company myself. The 2017 thing is not as big a deal since there are companies that only look back 3 years. A rolling stop conviction less than a year ago is a lot tougher an obstacle to get past... Others here will hopefully know more about your options, if any (besides waiting a while), as I've seen in similar posts to yours. I have heard of one company via these posts; haven't really looked into that one myself, but you should shortly see what others have to say.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hello,

I've just received my PA Class A CDL Learner's Permit and I will be getting all of the endorsements added in two weeks before I attend a private driving school.

Unfortunately, I have a juvenile record from almost ten years ago which is expunged however, the two underage's I received are on my ten year MVR report which were almost a decade ago. In PA before 2018, a minor would have their license suspended for 30-90 days the first offense and one year on the second offense. In 2011 when I was 17, I received a 60 day suspension on my a Class C drivers license before I even had one for being caught by the police for drinking. PA at the time had very strict laws regarding minors and drinking so I had a license suspension before I was even able to get a class c license.

My second underage drinking offense without driving was when I was 18 in 2012 and I had my license suspended for one year. These underage charges are not considered a misdemeanor or a felony.

I'm almost 27 now and the two violations I've had on my record in the last 5 years are is 10 mph over the limit in 2017 and for not fully stopping at a stop sign (rolling stop) last February.

I'm not proud of any of this and I own up to all of these mistakes. How badly will this affect me when it comes to getting my first job? Any information or advise will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Howdy Mitch, and welcome to Trucking Truth!

Your situation, although not 'awful, ' is one of MANY as to why we recommend company paid/sponsored training. If the companies accept you into their school/training, it's at least a 'conditional' hire, providing you pass their course! Then, JOB IN HAND.. accordingly.

Have you seen our links? Yours could possibly be a waste of money with background issues, in the pecking order of 'who' gets hired, and whom not. . . Look here:

I'll let the veterans chime in as to the history ... I've not a clue, sorry. I'm just of the IMHO that with CDLP in hand, you'd be better off to go THIS route:

Paid CDL Training Programs

Apply For Paid CDL Training

It's like having a 'golden ticket' in Willy Wonka. You get to 'attend.' Sure, you can still mess THAT up, but ... that's on YOU at that point, lol!

Hubby's been driving 20plus years.. and the pickin's nowadays are different than when he started.

Wish you the best~!!

~ Anne ~

good-luck.gif confused.gif good-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

This may affect you a lot on getting hired.

Yours is a great example of why we highly recommend attending company sponsored training. So you go through private schooling, then cannot get the job driving you want? With company training, you would be hired with much less risk and stress

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I do a lot of research when I get into something big, and this career tops them all, so I've learned a lot since I got my CDL in the fall and have been looking for a "right" company myself. The 2017 thing is not as big a deal since there are companies that only look back 3 years. A rolling stop conviction less than a year ago is a lot tougher an obstacle to get past... Others here will hopefully know more about your options, if any (besides waiting a while), as I've seen in similar posts to yours. I have heard of one company via these posts; haven't really looked into that one myself, but you should shortly see what others have to say.

Hahaha... it takes some awhile, J.D. ...true! I'm usually one to show up, lest I'm seeing that YOU already HAD~! Most of the others, the drivers, well ... are ... DRIVING, lol~! Appreciate you, man. I do... and I'm just ME~!

rofl-3.gif sorry.gif rofl-3.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

This may affect you a lot on getting hired.

Yours is a great example of why we highly recommend attending company sponsored training. So you go through private schooling, then cannot get the job driving you want? With company training, you would be hired with much less risk and stress

Agree with this - on a couple of levels.

Suspensions over a decade old, for non-driving-related offenses probably won't hurt TOO MUCH - once you explain them. If these were ACTUAL DUI's, they really become problematic. And the fact that they are over a decade old, while you were a minor (and now, we're MATURE ADULTS - RIGHT?) also probably weighs in your favor.

PA IS REALLY SCREWED UP. What they have is called "summary offense", and they tell you "it's less than a misdemeanor" and "not to worry about it - it's like a ticket for spitting on the sidewalk".

BS - they show up on BACKGROUND CHECKS (ask me how I know - WAIT - DON'T ASK ME). It's a crock of crap the way "the commonwealth" operates.

At any rate...

A trucking school (private) REALLY DOESN'T CARE if you can get a job driving with your background. THEIR ONLY TASK IS TO GET YOU A CDL. Pretty much ANYONE CAN GET A CDL (that isn't disqualified under the regs) - but NOT EVERYONE CAN GET A HIRE.

Applying and training with a COMPANY - assuming they accept your, you get through orientation and get your CDL - IS A JOB. YOU ARE ALREADY HIRED.

Don't LIE about the suspensions - but BE PREPARED TO EXPLAIN THEM. And EMPHASIZE that they were NOT DRIVING RELATED, but a penalty for non-driving related offenses.

APPLY APPLY APPLY.

And please come back and let us know how you did. It's getting FOLLOW UP INFORMATION on "strange cases" like this - that helps us advise other people down the road.

BEST OF LUCK TO YOU...

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Missed the "rolling stop conviction". This isn't a kiss of death - depending on HOW CLEAN the rest of your driving record is.

A hint that I tell everyone: FIGHT EVERY TICKET. It's with the $100 (or whatever a ticket attorney charges) for a shot at BEATING THE TICKET. Cop no-shows - case dismissed. Another pro-tip: motorcycle cops (and most troopers) ALWAYS SHOW - it's their job to write tickets and go to court (revenue stream).

But it still doesn't hurt to fight the ticket - EVERY TIME.

Rick

Eugene K.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Mitch - I was in the exact same boat. I had two underage alcohol possession tickets that resulted in 60 day suspensions, though the offenses were not vehicular in nature (I was 19 and 20 years old, respectively).

However, these offenses were 18 years old, and I’ve only had one speeding ticket since. My record is otherwise squeaky clean.

Currently, I’m in my second day of company sponsored training at Wilson Logistics, which is very selective and has a strict safety reputation. I had no problems. If they were ten years old, I’d imagine you’re fine, but Packrat is right — you’re much better off going with a company sponsored training program, because at least you know you already meet their minimum requirements for hiring. If you go private, you’re taking a risk.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Don's Comment
member avatar

Mitch A, with your driving citation history, I believe you are taking a chance with going to a private school to get your CDL. As others stated, the private school will (probably) accept you for training, but will trucking companies hire you afterwards? Why spend thousands of dollars of your money just for companies to tell you "sorry" afterwards? Companies that offer sponsored training is the way to go. If they accept you to their training program and you graduate and obtain your cdl , you will have a job waiting. Then you drive for a set amount of time for them and your tuition costs are reimbursed. Some compaies also give you the option of just paying your tuition if you like with no further work commitment. CFI in Missouri was the best decision I could have made. Training at their Crowder College campus in Neosho was really good, not to mention room and three very good cafeteria meals were included in the tuition, which was thousands of dollars cheaper than private schools here in Ohio.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I agree with the others. With having the suspension on your record, even for a non driving offense is going to make it harder. Then the 2 tickets, while not death sentences for your career is certainly gonna make it a little harder.

I would 150% say go find company sponsored training before you shell out for your cdl. A cdl is useless and expensive if you don't have a company willing to hire you. And while you could go the prehire route its still much safer to have the company hire you and train you themselves.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Prehire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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