Roehl GYCDL

Topic 29355 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Morgan's Comment
member avatar

When are you on the hook for the 7k they want for training?

I think Ive decided to go with them for flatbed and am wanting to get my CDL through them but despite tons of questions, my recruiter seemed dodgy about a lot and I still have a lot of questions. He answered a lot with 'you'll ask your driver trainer that' or 'thats a great question for your driver trainer' which just feels off to me, like they want me to come in blindsided.

He did say however that the day we step foot in the facility for orientation, we're required to follow through with the contract or pay the 7k. Is this true? It seems extreme considering theres so much you just dont know yet and aren't able to find answers to.

I really want to follow through with this, just afraid of a bait and switch or similar such conditions. If anyone has any experience with the GYCDL program, particularly for the flatbed division, and can chime in Id appreciate it!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

When are you on the hook for the 7k they want for training?

I think Ive decided to go with them for flatbed and am wanting to get my CDL through them but despite tons of questions, my recruiter seemed dodgy about a lot and I still have a lot of questions. He answered a lot with 'you'll ask your driver trainer that' or 'thats a great question for your driver trainer' which just feels off to me, like they want me to come in blindsided.

He did say however that the day we step foot in the facility for orientation, we're required to follow through with the contract or pay the 7k. Is this true? It seems extreme considering theres so much you just dont know yet and aren't able to find answers to.

I really want to follow through with this, just afraid of a bait and switch or similar such conditions. If anyone has any experience with the GYCDL program, particularly for the flatbed division, and can chime in Id appreciate it!

What kind of questions are they blowing off? Recruiters have one job and that is to get you in the door. I can tell you from my experiences with them roehl is very straightforward about how they want things done.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Morgan's Comment
member avatar

Mostly questions about what they allow in the trucks, and the driver facing cams.

I understand he may feel this isnt important for him to answer but to me it is, since I would like to know exactly what creature comforts Ill be allowed if Im agreeing to a contract over a year long.

I also received a bit of a muddy answer about slip seating - would I be sharing a truck as a regional driver? Ive heard a lot about having to go national if you want to avoid it.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Morgan I can tell you they are very straight forward. They have been at this along time as a company. Now you may have got ahold of a newer recruiter and he may not know. Things can and do change as time goes on.

As far as slip seating the 14/7 and 7/7 fleets used to have 2 drivers assigned to each truck. That way the truck keeps moving but you know your truck mate. Regional and OTR earn 1 day off each week so you will be in it. I don’t know where you heard otherwise, but I would question the accuracy.

I’m not sure but I think it is about 2-3 days into class. Basically when your drug test comes back. That initial period either one can part ways, afterward your on the hook for your tution. They are well known for working with students. It is in both parties best interest for students to succeed.

If you think your not getting satisfactory answers call recruiting and ask for Kim Calhoun. She has been there along time and is very straight forward.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

If anyone has any experience with the GYCDL program, particularly for the flatbed division, and can chime in Id appreciate it!

First, I don't think that division matters. You financial obligations for getting your CDL are the same whether you will pull a reefer or a flatbed. I am not sure how far you have to be in the program, it can be as far as until you test, but don't tell it for granted, ask Roehl. I dealt with a very accurate and knowledgeable lady, here is her contact information: Cheryl Nagel, Cheryl.Nagel@roehl.jobs, 715-591-7112. Also, it is not a time contract, you need to drive 120k miles for them to pay off these 7k. I do need to say though that I didn't ask too many questions. It is an established company, I am going into this industry, and they are helping me, so what else do I need to know? For example, why should I care about their cameras? If you are planning to do anything that you do not want to be seen by anyone, the best thing is just not do it at all, because sooner or later they will know about it anyway :-)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Morgan's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the detailed reply, Ill do that!

Im excited but want to be as informed as I can be since Ill be coming in as a complete newbie.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Listen carefully to the instructions they give you and follow them. You will do fine. People that bog themselves down with too many things tend to miss things, and not be prepared. Foscus on the task at hand. They will walk you through everything you need to be successful. Have faith and confidence they know what they are doing.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

Mostly questions about what they allow in the trucks, and the driver facing cams.

I understand he may feel this isnt important for him to answer but to me it is, since I would like to know exactly what creature comforts Ill be allowed if Im agreeing to a contract over a year long.

I also received a bit of a muddy answer about slip seating - would I be sharing a truck as a regional driver? Ive heard a lot about having to go national if you want to avoid it.

They do have driver facing cameras. That was my sticking point and one of the reasons I didn't go back when I came back OTR. As far as creature comforts when I left they still weren't putting fridges in the trucks, and they didn't have inverters. So anything you put in the truck has to be 12v and plug into a cigarette lighter. Granted most of my info is 3+ years old but nothing changed when I talked to them about going back.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mike H.'s Comment
member avatar

For the camera,their SAFETY DEPARTMENT should be able to answer any questions/concerns you have

Maybe you could talk with the shop manager concerning what's allowed for "creature comforts"

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More