3 Choices

Topic 29386 | Page 1

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John B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone. So I have received 3 offers for cdl school. Prime Wilson and Roehl. I live in Delaware and trying to figure out which is best for my location. My family and I understand the first OTR year will be the hardest and I have earn my stripes. I’m a lineman now so I do know what it’s like being a rookie in a dangerous job. I understand every company has its pros and cons and have sucked up every piece of info I can find on here, just looking for some current opinions.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

The best company to go with is the one that suits your personal needs.

What kind of hometime do they offer?

Do they allow riders or pets?

Are you required to park your truck at a terminal?

Things like that is what you should be considering, if that makes sense.

They're all good companies, so find the one you'll be glad to work for many years, because job hopping is never a good thing in trucking.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I ran Delaware all the time for Roehl. We covered a Kraft plant down in Dover...as well as a logistics warehouse down in Hurlock, MD

I went through Roehls CDL school in October 2014. Went from school right in their Kraft Dedicated account out of Winchester Va.

All three would be great companies with which to start your career. A lot depends on what you are looking for to start your career.

One of the things Roehl offered was attractive hometime. On the dedicated account I was home weekly for my reset. If I needed extra days, I would stay out a weekend and earn the day.

Good luck moving forward.

Tim

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you. Roehl seems the best home time I would like I said I know my first year’s gonna be tough. I’m changing careers I’ve been with the same company for 20 and I’m pushing 50 years old and climbing telephone poles it’s getting harder to do each day. I came to the realization that I need to start acting my age a little and truck driving Will give me the benefit of not being crippled when I’m 55. I did see the dedicated routes for roehl that the others weren’t offering, but like I said this is a new career and I’m not looking to jump ship after my contract if I can stay with the same company for years I will. It seems like after they pulled my work history every company was chomping at the bit because I stick with what I do.

I ran Delaware all the time for Roehl. We covered a Kraft plant down in Dover...as well as a logistics warehouse down in Hurlock, MD

I went through Roehls CDL school in October 2014. Went from school right in their Kraft Dedicated account out of Winchester Va.

All three would be great companies with which to start your career. A lot depends on what you are looking for to start your career.

One of the things Roehl offered was attractive hometime. On the dedicated account I was home weekly for my reset. If I needed extra days, I would stay out a weekend and earn the day.

Good luck moving forward.

Tim

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Keep in mind the more home time the less you make. One member here complained he only made $35k his first year....but he did 7 out 7 home...so only worked 6 months a year!

Prime would.let you take the truck home and there are tons of loads in that area to get you home. I live just over the NJ DE border. Although there is a terminal in thr Poconos it wont matter. We have a drop yard in Bensalem PA which allows me to drop and home.

Prime has a Northeast regional (which I don't recommend right away) that could get you home more often than OTR. We also have intermodal which may do the same. We are allowed passengers and pets....pet fee is $1000... But supposed to be a deposit.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

The best company to go with is the one that suits your personal needs.

What kind of hometime do they offer?

Do they allow riders or pets?

Are you required to park your truck at a terminal?

Things like that is what you should be considering, if that makes sense.

They're all good companies, so find the one you'll be glad to work for many years, because job hopping is never a good thing in trucking.

Many of usn's are glad to see you around, SUE~!

You've become on the MIA list.. jsyk! I'm sure somebody (Rob T. ?) will take you off his list.

Always good advice, m'lady. I'll get there someday~!!

Stay safe; And blessed!!

~ Anne ~

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone. So I have received 3 offers for cdl school. Prime Wilson and Roehl. I live in Delaware and trying to figure out which is best for my location. My family and I understand the first OTR year will be the hardest and I have earn my stripes. I’m a lineman now so I do know what it’s like being a rookie in a dangerous job. I understand every company has its pros and cons and have sucked up every piece of info I can find on here, just looking for some current opinions.

Delaware should be an excellent lane, for some freight... I'd take the Prime & Wilson offers FIRST and foremost. Just did some digging on this site, and then some again. The Prime 'family' loves y'all New Englanders, as it seems!!

Would you be looking into Roehl flats, or vans/reefers?

Best wishes!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hey everyone. So I have received 3 offers for cdl school. Prime Wilson and Roehl. I live in Delaware and trying to figure out which is best for my location. My family and I understand the first OTR year will be the hardest and I have earn my stripes. I’m a lineman now so I do know what it’s like being a rookie in a dangerous job. I understand every company has its pros and cons and have sucked up every piece of info I can find on here, just looking for some current opinions.

double-quotes-end.png

The Prime 'family' loves y'all New Englanders, as it seems!!

Would you be looking into Roehl flats, or vans/reefers?

Best wishes!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Please disregard that last post. I didn't mean to hit "submit". Premature submission is embarrassing, but it happens to a lot of us some times🤔🤣

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

Prime has a Northeast regional (which I don't recommend right away) that could get you home more often than OTR.

Why do you not recommend a NE regional fleet?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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