Recruiters

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Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I like that pulse as well. It keeps track of the conversations nicely and the recruiters seem to like messaging in it. Im in Denver. Wilson seems like a great opportunity to me as well although I hardly ever see their trucks through here (i 25 corridor) and the recruiter was a bit more evasive about running LA and SF as well as time out, He said regional was more like 2 to 3 weeks out. Knight just kind of struck me as family as well, but of course that was just after talking to the recruiter. I asked him a ton of questions. How are they for home time (regional western 10 with no CA) and miles? He said dry van , which is what Id prefer (I think lol). Im still waiting to see if he can get me approved regarding a few speeding tickets, but he said he was going to try. How was their dispatch and load assignment?

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Have you tried filling out the quick apply or full application on their websites? I did and my phone, email and texts have been ringing off the hook from them. I Talked with Knight for about an hour the other day, also got approved for hire by Wilson and Prime.

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Yeah, that's always my first move. I'm finding the Pulse by Tenstreet site very helpful, lets you chat directly with recruiters instead of going through email which can take much longer for responses.

Looks like you're new here, good on ya for the pre-hires. I drove for Knight for the last few years in their refrigerated division. Obviously I can't speak to whatever city you'd be based out of if you went with them, but I had a great staff at my home terminal. They always looked out for me and resolved any issues I had promptly. It honestly felt like driving for a smaller company because I interacted with those same few people 98 percent of the time; only really had to talk to anyone at the headquarters in Phoenix late night on weekends. I'd definitely recommend them...but then, I don't know much about Wilson and Prime to compare to. Happy to answer any Knight related questions you may have

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Knight just kind of struck me as family as well, but of course that was just after talking to the recruiter. I asked him a ton of questions. How are they for home time (regional western 10 with no CA) and miles? He said dry van , which is what Id prefer (I think lol). Im still waiting to see if he can get me approved regarding a few speeding tickets, but he said he was going to try. How was their dispatch and load assignment?

Davy, this whole process of choosing a company is flawed in my opinion. I'm not referring to the way that you are going about it, but I am speaking in general. Everywhere we look on the internet are comments from people we don't even know. We take their comments and we run with them. There's just no way that can help us try to find the proper trucking job. There are so many whining complaining truckers out there that we can't make sense of the chatter. The reason that is so is because of the way trucking is structured. There are layers of management in all trucking companies. But as far as the drivers are concerned, It is actually a very simple set up. You will ultimately have very little contact with anyone but your driver manager.

Did you notice what Seppo said?

I drove for Knight for the last few years in their refrigerated division. Obviously I can't speak to whatever city you'd be based out of if you went with them, but I had a great staff at my home terminal. They always looked out for me and resolved any issues I had promptly. It honestly felt like driving for a smaller company because I interacted with those same few people 98 percent of the time

That's exactly how most trucking jobs work. It is incumbent on the driver to develop a solid working relationship with his manager. That person is your life line out here. They want you to be safe and productive. When you are, they are your champion. They will help you when you need it, and they will do you little favors when you request them. They will do everything they can to keep you happy and moving tons of freight. I always make it a strong point to get to know how my dispatcher likes to work. I do things the way they prefer. I give them great and accurate communications with the Qualcomm and I don't bother them on the phone because I know they are busy with drivers who are not as competent or confident as my years of experience help me to be. The less interaction the better. I do my job without being a bother - they love that type driver.

Knight management is structured in a way that makes each terminal unique. Each terminal is a business unit unto itself. They are responsible for their own results. Each terminal must perform in a way that proves it is successful. I like the way they do things. It makes it so each person on the team is responsible for getting positive results. The slackers, if there are any, become obvious in that small unit atmosphere. Because of their approach you will generally find helpful employees there no matter what level you are dealing with. I worked at a terminal where the manager actually stepped down and took a lower level position because he just wasn't keeping things profitable. I don't think his move was voluntary. I think it was offered him to save face on his part. He was a valued employee, but he just wasn't capable of doing what they needed him to at that management level. He is still there working at that terminal to this day, but the man they brought in to be manager is getting better results than the former one.

Don't try to find what you think will be a "family atmosphere." There is no such thing. This is business. You will develop the kind of atmosphere you desire, and you will mostly only have to do that with one person. I doubt you will really get this during your rookie year. That year is just tough at the beginning. Most rookies have the thought cross their mind at least a 100 times that they made the wrong choice of company to start with. That is just because they don't know what they are doing yet and life is challenging for the new guys. In trucking you are on a team, but your individual play is critical.

Would it surprise you if I tell you that I seldom talk with my dispatcher? We may not actually speak for a couple of weeks at a time. I work a dedicated account at Knight and I stay very busy. They know what I am capable of and they just keep putting loads on me so that I don't sit around waiting on them. That relationship came from our history together. My driver manager and I worked that out. We both have a lot of respect for each other because we know how well we can count on each other. I have no problems getting home, and I have no problems making sure a lot of work gets accomplished when I am on the road.

Make sure you are making money for the team and everything will fall into place for you as a driver. It won't matter if it says Wilson or Knight on your truck doors. Great drivers get great treatment.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I agree with Seppo regarding emailing. It's just more efficient and convenient. As I put some feelers out there, it would be easier to shoot and respond to emails rather than playing phone tag. Answering my phone isn't always possible and it makes it easier to compare prospective employers.

Seth N.'s Comment
member avatar

I just recently got my CDL-A and have been going through the recruiter "call and pry for answers cycle" as well. Been all over this forum looking at company thoughts, all over Indeed looking at reviews, and watching YouTube vids of drivers, and even the companies own YT pages as much as i can. The way i did applications was through Tenstreet or a quick app on their site and wait for the phone call. I don't like talking on the phone much, but they got my questions answered quickly and easily that way for all but 2 companies.

In the last 6 days I've talked to recruiters from a bunch of companies! From what my schools director and others have said, they expect to have a decent amount of people just looking for general info only, and the quicker you get to the point the better. Especially when you already have your CDL and are not tied down to any company.

I applied to Swift, Pam, CRST, Melton, Maverick, TMC, US Express, Roehl, Sygma, CFI, Werner, KLLM, Transport America, Stevens Transport(the mega carrier), Stevens Trucking Inc(more local company), 2 local companies who I wanna move up to at 6 months to 1 year, and even asked JB hunt but they're 3 month minimum experience.

The ONLY companies I seemed to have any issue getting answers out of was Sygma... they wanted to send an email rather than talk, and didn't give exact pay till I called their recruiters direct line that was on the email. And also Swift... with them it took 2 days of phone tag to get a call back and had to kinda pry about hometime and pay, and exactly what I would be doing on the job. Honestly

The thing I learned quick to say was... "Hi, i just recently graduated CDL school in December and im just now looking for companies to work. i was just wondering what you offer for pay, routes available in my area, and hometime wise" I would then ask about their average mileage, and orientation process, and this seemed to get me the most info the quickest, and let me vet each company head to head(which is why i went to a private CDL school in the first place.) It also doesnt show that I am super interested or that I NEED the job, and lets me get straight to the point of whether they are even worth considering. This has narrowed it down IMMENSELY for me and straight up disqualified 5-6 of these companies based on either terrible hometime, or terrible pay.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I just recently got my CDL-A and have been going through the recruiter "call and pry for answers cycle" as well. Been all over this forum looking at company thoughts, all over Indeed looking at reviews, and watching YouTube vids of drivers, and even the companies own YT pages as much as i can. The way i did applications was through Tenstreet or a quick app on their site and wait for the phone call. I don't like talking on the phone much, but they got my questions answered quickly and easily that way for all but 2 companies.

In the last 6 days I've talked to recruiters from a bunch of companies! From what my schools director and others have said, they expect to have a decent amount of people just looking for general info only, and the quicker you get to the point the better. Especially when you already have your CDL and are not tied down to any company.

I applied to Swift, Pam, CRST, Melton, Maverick, TMC, US Express, Roehl, Sygma, CFI, Werner, KLLM, Transport America, Stevens Transport(the mega carrier), Stevens Trucking Inc(more local company), 2 local companies who I wanna move up to at 6 months to 1 year, and even asked JB hunt but they're 3 month minimum experience.

The ONLY companies I seemed to have any issue getting answers out of was Sygma... they wanted to send an email rather than talk, and didn't give exact pay till I called their recruiters direct line that was on the email. And also Swift... with them it took 2 days of phone tag to get a call back and had to kinda pry about hometime and pay, and exactly what I would be doing on the job. Honestly

The thing I learned quick to say was... "Hi, i just recently graduated CDL school in December and im just now looking for companies to work. i was just wondering what you offer for pay, routes available in my area, and hometime wise" I would then ask about their average mileage, and orientation process, and this seemed to get me the most info the quickest, and let me vet each company head to head(which is why i went to a private CDL school in the first place.) It also doesnt show that I am super interested or that I NEED the job, and lets me get straight to the point of whether they are even worth considering. This has narrowed it down IMMENSELY for me and straight up disqualified 5-6 of these companies based on either terrible hometime, or terrible pay.

You are aware that you have an effective deadline on how long you're worth anything as a completely unskilled driver with a fresh CDL, right?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Interesting and valuable advice and info. I do take it to heart for sure. This site has been extremely valuable beyond words in helping me get prepared for this. When I say family atmosphere, I just mean personable (of course recruiters in any field are paid to be personable lol). I figure the first year is about me learning this and just doing the best I can and Ill take every challenge I can as an opportunity to grow. I think i have pretty realistic expectations and know my assets and liabilities.

Seth N.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I just recently got my CDL-A and have been going through the recruiter "call and pry for answers cycle" as well. Been all over this forum looking at company thoughts, all over Indeed looking at reviews, and watching YouTube vids of drivers, and even the companies own YT pages as much as i can. The way i did applications was through Tenstreet or a quick app on their site and wait for the phone call. I don't like talking on the phone much, but they got my questions answered quickly and easily that way for all but 2 companies.

In the last 6 days I've talked to recruiters from a bunch of companies! From what my schools director and others have said, they expect to have a decent amount of people just looking for general info only, and the quicker you get to the point the better. Especially when you already have your CDL and are not tied down to any company.

I applied to Swift, Pam, CRST, Melton, Maverick, TMC, US Express, Roehl, Sygma, CFI, Werner, KLLM, Transport America, Stevens Transport(the mega carrier), Stevens Trucking Inc(more local company), 2 local companies who I wanna move up to at 6 months to 1 year, and even asked JB hunt but they're 3 month minimum experience.

The ONLY companies I seemed to have any issue getting answers out of was Sygma... they wanted to send an email rather than talk, and didn't give exact pay till I called their recruiters direct line that was on the email. And also Swift... with them it took 2 days of phone tag to get a call back and had to kinda pry about hometime and pay, and exactly what I would be doing on the job. Honestly

The thing I learned quick to say was... "Hi, i just recently graduated CDL school in December and im just now looking for companies to work. i was just wondering what you offer for pay, routes available in my area, and hometime wise" I would then ask about their average mileage, and orientation process, and this seemed to get me the most info the quickest, and let me vet each company head to head(which is why i went to a private CDL school in the first place.) It also doesnt show that I am super interested or that I NEED the job, and lets me get straight to the point of whether they are even worth considering. This has narrowed it down IMMENSELY for me and straight up disqualified 5-6 of these companies based on either terrible hometime, or terrible pay.

double-quotes-end.png

You are aware that you have an effective deadline on how long you're worth anything as a completely unskilled driver with a fresh CDL, right?

Yes i am, it has caused no issues thus far for me or any of my classmates. I aced the school and have a completely clean record and dont drink or do drugs. That alone has suprised a LOT of the companies ive talked to. Only 2 companies have turned me down(pam as i didnt have a good enough work history and they are really strict for their current positions) and JB hunt. The rest have been more than willing to have me. Being honest and having a clean record is a lot more uuncommon than youd think for these people according to them lol

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Seth N.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-end.png

You are aware that you have an effective deadline on how long you're worth anything as a completely unskilled driver with a fresh CDL , right?

Also i forgot to mention...i JUST NOW got the actual CDL in the mail due to covid after 5 weeks of waiting. Took me almost a week of waiting till they had an opening just to get the paperwork filed and info to get it sent out. Thats the ONLY reason i waited till now, as i was told i should get the physical license before i applied to companies by 2 recruiters and my school, as its caused issues before.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I just recently got my CDL-A and have been going through the recruiter "call and pry for answers cycle" as well. Been all over this forum looking at company thoughts, all over Indeed looking at reviews, and watching YouTube vids of drivers, and even the companies own YT pages as much as i can. The way i did applications was through Tenstreet or a quick app on their site and wait for the phone call. I don't like talking on the phone much, but they got my questions answered quickly and easily that way for all but 2 companies.

In the last 6 days I've talked to recruiters from a bunch of companies! From what my schools director and others have said, they expect to have a decent amount of people just looking for general info only, and the quicker you get to the point the better. Especially when you already have your CDL and are not tied down to any company.

I applied to Swift, Pam, CRST, Melton, Maverick, TMC, US Express, Roehl, Sygma, CFI, Werner, KLLM, Transport America, Stevens Transport(the mega carrier), Stevens Trucking Inc(more local company), 2 local companies who I wanna move up to at 6 months to 1 year, and even asked JB hunt but they're 3 month minimum experience.

The ONLY companies I seemed to have any issue getting answers out of was Sygma... they wanted to send an email rather than talk, and didn't give exact pay till I called their recruiters direct line that was on the email. And also Swift... with them it took 2 days of phone tag to get a call back and had to kinda pry about hometime and pay, and exactly what I would be doing on the job. Honestly

The thing I learned quick to say was... "Hi, i just recently graduated CDL school in December and im just now looking for companies to work. i was just wondering what you offer for pay, routes available in my area, and hometime wise" I would then ask about their average mileage, and orientation process, and this seemed to get me the most info the quickest, and let me vet each company head to head(which is why i went to a private CDL school in the first place.) It also doesnt show that I am super interested or that I NEED the job, and lets me get straight to the point of whether they are even worth considering. This has narrowed it down IMMENSELY for me and straight up disqualified 5-6 of these companies based on either terrible hometime, or terrible pay.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You are aware that you have an effective deadline on how long you're worth anything as a completely unskilled driver with a fresh CDL, right?

double-quotes-end.png

Yes i am, it has caused no issues thus far for me or any of my classmates. I aced the school and have a completely clean record and dont drink or do drugs. That alone has suprised a LOT of the companies ive talked to. Only 2 companies have turned me down(pam as i didnt have a good enough work history and they are really strict for their current positions) and JB hunt. The rest have been more than willing to have me. Being honest and having a clean record is a lot more uuncommon than youd think for these people according to them lol

JB Hunt? They seem to have their hands in everything. Curious as to why they turned you down.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-end.png

You are aware that you have an effective deadline on how long you're worth anything as a completely unskilled driver with a fresh CDL , right?

Also i forgot to mention...i JUST NOW got the actual CDL in the mail due to covid after 5 weeks of waiting. Took me almost a week of waiting till they had an opening just to get the paperwork filed and info to get it sent out. Thats the ONLY reason i waited till now, as i was told i should get the physical license before i applied to companies by 2 recruiters and my school, as its caused issues before.

Does the issue date of your CDL actually reflect this? If it does, awesome. If it doesn't, you've basically already burned probably about a third of the time you'll have to find a job with ease.

You've got a professional manner about your typing, but if you've been sucking down information from this website, then you should well know that your start in this field has MUCH more to do with your own attitude and drive than the company you start with.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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