How To Get Off My DM's Bad Side

Topic 29569 | Page 2

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Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I may have missed it but what steps were taken to change DMs and stop driving teams? I remember a ton of good advice given then you were fired then you got your job back. What happened with the other stuff or was you so happy to still be employed you just let it go?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Zach 's Comment
member avatar

I may have missed it but what steps were taken to change DMs and stop driving teams? I remember a ton of good advice given then you were fired then you got your job back. What happened with the other stuff or was you so happy to still be employed you just let it go?

I just let it go, its I've asked so many different people and my requests have fallen on deaf ears, it is what it is. I'm more worried about staying employed and somehow becoming a good driver, well my driving is pretty damn good its more of the qualcomm instructions that get me

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

well my driving is pretty damn good its more of the qualcomm instructions that get me

Really? Five days ago you were having problems with backing. You mastered that fast.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Don's Comment
member avatar

I don't know about Western Express, or other companies, but at my company, if the DM was treating me with the disrespect your's shows you, I would be setting him straight, then speaking to my boss. Your DM has no right to be threatening you, screaming at you or getting p***ed. Go over his damn head and get another DM! If you won't try, then that's on you.

He complains that I have too many questions, and that I should know alot more then I do, he gets ****ed whenever I call him since he never responds to macros but blows up my phone to screame my head off and cuss me out because I had a hard time finding an empty or took too long to get somewhere etc he has told hire ups I'm a crap driver

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Zach 's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

well my driving is pretty damn good its more of the qualcomm instructions that get me

double-quotes-end.png

Really? Five days ago you were having problems with backing. You mastered that fast.

I never said I've mastered it, I still suck at it but I've gotten better. I don't know if I will ever hear the words "mastered" come out of my mouth, there is always room for improvement. Especially out here

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

When you get your dispatch are you doin live loads or live in loads by appointment time? Or drop an hook ?? When you get your dispatch write it down address p/u number load number weight adress and phone number of the shipper and the consigne you do the same google map it check out your route figure out your eta and see if it matches your app time and blast out !!! Then it’s just driving safely and maximizing your clock !!! Then you got your backing but that’s not a big deal just take your time your there get it in the dock send your loaded call and bounce out to consigne your just driving now do the same there send your empty call !!! Wash rinse repeat it’s gonna be hard at 1st it is for everyone but look at how many people do it!!! And find your groove to also do it !! Run like that for 3 weeks just make your delivery and start getting smooth at it and less stress will follow shoot me your number!!! I’ll help as much as I can !! I had help but I did what was given to me from everyone here !! But I did it till I made it work I wrestled with qaulcom too but I quit fighting it and started figuring out what it could do for me and it’s really self explanatory just read it macros they’re already done for you! Free form you write your message off duty sleeper birth on duty driving fueling break down it’s all on there and bro truckers will help just ask I did they gave me a little razzin but we’re happy to help

double-quotes-start.png

I may have missed it but what steps were taken to change DMs and stop driving teams? I remember a ton of good advice given then you were fired then you got your job back. What happened with the other stuff or was you so happy to still be employed you just let it go?

double-quotes-end.png

I just let it go, its I've asked so many different people and my requests have fallen on deaf ears, it is what it is. I'm more worried about staying employed and somehow becoming a good driver, well my driving is pretty damn good its more of the qualcomm instructions that get me

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I completely agree with Jammer. At this point is just all about you doing your job without needing to talk to your DM. If you don't understand the Qualcomm messages that's okay. You don't have to decipher every little detail. Figure out what is important. Jammer laid it out. Get your appointment time and write that down. Get your consignee's address and write that down. Get your fuel stop and write that down. That's all you need to do your job. Make sure you get there on time. Send in an arrival call so they know you are there. When you get empty send in your empty call so they can get you another load.

Break it down into simple steps. Write them down so that you can reference them, and so that you know what to do. Before you know it you will be an ace at this. It's not rocket science, but it is really hard and frustrating at first. We can all empathize with your frustrations, but you can't count on your dispatcher to be holding your hand. He wants independent guys out there pulling freight for him. He doesn't have time to explain everything. That is not his job. Our driver managers need us to do our jobs. We figure out the details. We handle all that stuff. We get our assignments from them and then we make it happen - that's what makes you a professional driver. You solve your own problems.

Hey Zach, I know you can do this, you've just got to keep at it until you can build some confidence. Make it a goal on the next three loads to do everything in your power to avoid calling your DM. Try that and see what it does for you. Write down the important details about the load and don't worry about anything else. Just get the details and run it. Don't pick up that phone unless it is an absolute emergency. Try it. Then set another goal for five loads without calling in for help. It will change your career and your relationship with your DM.

I got an email today from my former driver manager. I am going to share part of it with you. It is illustrative of how these guys think. He was just expressing some thoughts about how much he misses me and he brought up his current drivers. Take a look at this portion of his message to me...

these guys need guidance, and a lot more than I can give them. I’m struggling, man... i got a lot of young guys that just don’t get it. I’m spending way too much time on the phone having ignorant conversations, over and over, day after day. Yes, I miss you.... You keep taking care of yourself, ask your wife to please do the same, and know you always have a spot here if you want it. And if I don’t have a spot for you, I’ll make one.

They do not even expect to be on the phone with you explaining how to get this job done. They figure that is on you. I know you had some really bad training, but that is not for your DM to correct. I was in the same boat when I was at Western Express. My trainer was lousy. It didn't really mean anything. I just set out to figure it out on my own. That is exactly how I approached it. I decided I was going to be the most productive driver they had ever encountered. You can do it Zach. Hold your head high and deal with the issues as they arise. Try your best to stay off the phone with them. It will go a long ways toward you building your own critical thinking skills and your confidence in your own abilities to solve problems.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Zach 's Comment
member avatar

The problem I'm having is the load planners set out one macro with instructions and then my DM sends another since according to him "the load planners can't do there job and he knows the best way to do things" his instructions make no sense and he abbreviate every possible word and then always says if there is any confusion to ask and not just go off assuming things and then gets mad when I ask him to clarity on things. He is also constantly playing the " I can have you terminated off the truck and leave you stranded" card whenever he gets mad. He micro manages to the point where if I stop to take a shower twice a week he is ****ed even though I have plenty of time "the wheels should always be rolling" every single driver i know that has him as a DM has the same issues I am having

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Adress appointment time destination

The problem I'm having is the load planners set out one macro with instructions and then my DM sends another since according to him "the load planners can't do there job and he knows the best way to do things" his instructions make no sense and he abbreviate every possible word and then always says if there is any confusion to ask and not just go off assuming things and then gets mad when I ask him to clarity on things. He is also constantly playing the " I can have you terminated off the truck and leave you stranded" card whenever he gets mad. He micro manages to the point where if I stop to take a shower twice a week he is ****ed even though I have plenty of time "the wheels should always be rolling" every single driver i know that has him as a DM has the same issues I am having

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Post a picture of your dispatch so we can see it

The problem I'm having is the load planners set out one macro with instructions and then my DM sends another since according to him "the load planners can't do there job and he knows the best way to do things" his instructions make no sense and he abbreviate every possible word and then always says if there is any confusion to ask and not just go off assuming things and then gets mad when I ask him to clarity on things. He is also constantly playing the " I can have you terminated off the truck and leave you stranded" card whenever he gets mad. He micro manages to the point where if I stop to take a shower twice a week he is ****ed even though I have plenty of time "the wheels should always be rolling" every single driver i know that has him as a DM has the same issues I am having

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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