How Can I Make Any Money At This?

Topic 29575 | Page 1

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Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

Question for all of you more experienced drivers. So I’m going out to Nashville tomorrow for orientation but I’m a little skeptical on the .32cpm and how I’m going to make a living on it. Even at 3000 miles a week it’s 960 gross, which is going to be a hard pill to swallow. I guess I’m asking if there are any of you who currently work for western express who can give me tips on how to make more money or if they truly start you off at .32cpm?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

They’re gonna start you off at 32 cents per mile you should’ve known this?? Your gonna have to run an run but flat bedders do pretty well no sliding scale after 3 months they’ll make you a trainer

Question for all of you more experienced drivers. So I’m going out to Nashville tomorrow for orientation but I’m a little skeptical on the .32cpm and how I’m going to make a living on it. Even at 3000 miles a week it’s 960 gross, which is going to be a hard pill to swallow. I guess I’m asking if there are any of you who currently work for western express who can give me tips on how to make more money or if they truly start you off at .32cpm?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

I’ll pass on the trainer status . That’s how more accidents happen out here because off the blind leading the blind per say.

They’re gonna start you off at 32 cents per mile you should’ve known this?? Your gonna have to run an run but flat bedders do pretty well no sliding scale after 3 months they’ll make you a trainer

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Question for all of you more experienced drivers. So I’m going out to Nashville tomorrow for orientation but I’m a little skeptical on the .32cpm and how I’m going to make a living on it. Even at 3000 miles a week it’s 960 gross, which is going to be a hard pill to swallow. I guess I’m asking if there are any of you who currently work for western express who can give me tips on how to make more money or if they truly start you off at .32cpm?

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CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Agree 100% just saying how many incidents do you have again??? Just forgot lol

I’ll pass on the trainer status . That’s how more accidents happen out here because off the blind leading the blind per say.

double-quotes-start.png

They’re gonna start you off at 32 cents per mile you should’ve known this?? Your gonna have to run an run but flat bedders do pretty well no sliding scale after 3 months they’ll make you a trainer

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Question for all of you more experienced drivers. So I’m going out to Nashville tomorrow for orientation but I’m a little skeptical on the .32cpm and how I’m going to make a living on it. Even at 3000 miles a week it’s 960 gross, which is going to be a hard pill to swallow. I guess I’m asking if there are any of you who currently work for western express who can give me tips on how to make more money or if they truly start you off at .32cpm?

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CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

2

Agree 100% just saying how many incidents do you have again??? Just forgot lol

double-quotes-start.png

I’ll pass on the trainer status . That’s how more accidents happen out here because off the blind leading the blind per say.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

They’re gonna start you off at 32 cents per mile you should’ve known this?? Your gonna have to run an run but flat bedders do pretty well no sliding scale after 3 months they’ll make you a trainer

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Question for all of you more experienced drivers. So I’m going out to Nashville tomorrow for orientation but I’m a little skeptical on the .32cpm and how I’m going to make a living on it. Even at 3000 miles a week it’s 960 gross, which is going to be a hard pill to swallow. I guess I’m asking if there are any of you who currently work for western express who can give me tips on how to make more money or if they truly start you off at .32cpm?

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CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Do you have an email ?

2

double-quotes-start.png

Agree 100% just saying how many incidents do you have again??? Just forgot lol

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I’ll pass on the trainer status . That’s how more accidents happen out here because off the blind leading the blind per say.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

They’re gonna start you off at 32 cents per mile you should’ve known this?? Your gonna have to run an run but flat bedders do pretty well no sliding scale after 3 months they’ll make you a trainer

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Question for all of you more experienced drivers. So I’m going out to Nashville tomorrow for orientation but I’m a little skeptical on the .32cpm and how I’m going to make a living on it. Even at 3000 miles a week it’s 960 gross, which is going to be a hard pill to swallow. I guess I’m asking if there are any of you who currently work for western express who can give me tips on how to make more money or if they truly start you off at .32cpm?

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CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Steppenwolf 's Comment
member avatar

32 cpm is pretty good to start with. I only got 26 for training. Just get in there and run...more will come with time. Steppenwolf

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Eric, you have to realize you kind of got yourself into this situation. You are fortunate right now to be able to get a truck driving job. Your priority right now is: Don't Hit Anything!

I'm not trying to burst your bubble, but you know how you got here. You've got a whole new standard to work on now. Safety has got to be your priority right now. You are going to be creating opportunity for yourself at this new gig. You may not make the kind of money you want right now, but the record you are going to be building for yourself, by getting the job done with no accidents, will certainly lay a foundation you can build on for a brighter future.

I started my career at Western Express making 27 CPM. I ended up being a top producer in their flat-bed fleet and they bumped my pay every three months. They may say you get a review for a pay raise in one year, but I found that top performers got a lot more consideration simply because the company wanted them to stay on board. I made fifty thousand dollars my rookie year and I started at a lower rate than you will. Trucking is all about safety and productivity. Even if you have to struggle for this next year, not making the kind of money you want, you can be confident you are building a solid foundation for your career by being safe. That one year straight with no accidents will open up all kinds of doors for you. Keep that in mind. That is your priority right now. NO ACCIDENTS.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Ted P.'s Comment
member avatar

You have to get used to being paid a small amount because of your lack of experience, it doesn't really matter where you're going or driving for, after you're driving for at least six months consistently then and only then you can expect the pay increase. This is a troubling time for you, you're going to want to look into other people's backyard and see the grass is greener in their yard then your own. Sorry to use the saying, however it is true. You must drive your truck responsibly, remember this if you remember anything else,. YOU trust but verify everything. Directions, addresses, and routes you need to drive...

Another useful task for you to practice, stay out of the truck stops. It's expensive even if you don't think so. When you're sleeping and surviving in that truck, live in that truck as you would if you were living alone, you don't go out to eat every time you have a meal, you will gain weight... get into the habit of exercising and walking around your truck after you wake up, regardless the temperature outside, you will need to say somewhat physically active while on the road, it helps it helps a lot. If needs be go to a Walmart or some other grocery store of some kind, buy food and survive just in that truck. In a way it's like going camping, me personally I had an emergency service in the truck just in case I had to go to the bathroom, camping type of porta potties are available for camping needs. No it isn't what everyone talks about but everyone understands depending on what you eat depends on how solid your stool is but it is a bodily function that we cannot deny, and it is irresponsible thinking to ignore it, most drivers use a old water bottle as a urinal, it's a good way to keep you out of the truck stops, controlling one's bodily functions is a skill that you learn, unfortunately. It is also the main reason why truck drivers are looked at to be very disgusting people because most people forget to get rid of that on a daily basis. If you are responsible with it it's no big deal,

For the most part all of the information I am giving you is needed information especially when you're starting out by yourself, learn about the job, and or lifestyle, it is not something you can just go to work and come home, because once you deliver the load you have to be ready to leave immediately to do it again. there are a few key issues that you need to address or have addressed just in case.

Your safety in that truck, no it is not legal for most companies to carry a firearm in that truck, but you can have other tools available for you just in case an intruder breaks into the truck while you're in it, tire thumpers are always a good tool to use in this, another is wasp spray (be careful with that one) I would strongly suggest look into some legal service to follow you in your career just in case. I did, the only way a driver can actually make money being a truck driver is to own the truck. Once you get to that point the money changes drastically. Earning a $900 paycheck a week gross is pretty typical. but if you stick at it you can make a decent life for yourself and your family. Being an owner is a bigger responsibility and a bigger cost to you, a good thing not to do is dream, focus on the task at hand and you will be fine... Sorry for the book, but I do pick on a few topics that are REAL and problemsome when you are on the road... When driving respect other people, even if they don't deserve it. Watch your distance...

Another point I can bring up very short, is vehicle spacing, when I were actively driving it's called the Smith system, a lot of trucking companies adapted to the system and are teaching our drivers to do the same. The Smith System, teaches drivers to look as far as possible there was second of every minute of every hour of every day, when you are driving down the road, Leave yourself and out, means leave yourself space next to you to maneuver if you need to, try to stay eight or nine seconds away from the vehicle in front of you, this is where the skill kicks in I have more experience guessing what drivers are going to do before they do it then you do, insurance companies have that part right.... Going up and down mountains take your time there's a lot at stake, your safety is key, there is no such thing as freight being more important than the driver. most toll bridges have available what's called is a bridge map, it's a map that signifies low clearance for semis that have height of 13 ft 6 in, I strongly suggest you get one ASAP. They're only available for local routes for drivers that are not from that town. Their availabile in cities your going towards.

Question for all of you more experienced drivers. So I’m going out to Nashville tomorrow for orientation but I’m a little skeptical on the .32cpm and how I’m going to make a living on it. Even at 3000 miles a week it’s 960 gross, which is going to be a hard pill to swallow. I guess I’m asking if there are any of you who currently work for western express who can give me tips on how to make more money or if they truly start you off at .32cpm?

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

"The only way to make money being a driver is owning the truck?" Total BS advice from Ted.

So the close to $72,000 I netted in 2020 as a company driver, with zero out of pocket truck expenses on me, were a failure?

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