How Can I Make Any Money At This?

Topic 29575 | Page 2

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Ted P.'s Comment
member avatar

you opinion driver, I grossed 170 grand in 2005-2009.... SO your saying what exactly, that YOU can't do that... LOL

I am NOT going to get into a financial debate over this, BUT just so this is said, I guess my personal motivation was more "driven" than yours. I did this, not you apparently. I have bought my wife's dream house, I have all my bills covered, I have savings of a unique sum, and I have a life that most dream of... like it or NOT... but my comment stands, IF you don't like your life than change it, I also negotiated my payment to pay me when I left the "house" til I got back to my house truck and trailer. most don't do this, but again I guess my motivation wasn't to be driving forever. I could afford to hire an attorney, CPA, Insurance that insured ME, and I have way more safe miles than most with all this being said, it comes down to your specific opinion over my experience.... and I guess you can have the "pride" but not the life, I shouldn't have to apologize to you or anyone for the life I chose... and frankly I'm NOT going to... again, if YOU don't like your life change, otherwise quit complaining... have a good day and be safe....

"The only way to make money being a driver is owning the truck?" Total BS advice from Ted.

So the close to $72,000 I netted in 2020 as a company driver, with zero out of pocket truck expenses on me, were a failure?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ralph G. ( Arejay )'s Comment
member avatar

Also, Let us not forget there is a bit more to the pay thing than just the almighty CPM. Many companies pay for detention, extra stops, short run pay, etc. etc. Also, and this is a HUGE one.... if you have a good working relationship with your DM , many times they are given a lot of discretion for extra pay and perks they can divvy out to keep their productive drivers happy on the road. An extra $50 here or $75 there may not seem like much, but over the course of the year it does add up pretty quickly... especially when it's free money you get for being a valued professional with your support team at the terminal. As a rookie myself, I've had my DM go out of his way to take care of me with extra pay. Also, I've received great loads when others were sitting in the yard waiting.... I helped out my team by shuttling some trailers they urgently needed moved locally and was immediately given a 900 mile load from Alabama to Maryland, what made that run even better was the deadhead from Lakeland, FL to Pennington, AL was well over 550 miles. Some good money there, when I could have been sitting around waiting for a load at the yard. I know this example doesn't say much about the extra $$ perks I spoke about above, but is an example of getting taken care of when you are a team player and have a good relationship with your support team.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Ted P.'s Comment
member avatar

IF that is ok with you, great... good for you, but the actual "freight" is irrelevant, in the long run, the career is what is important for most, is the "making money part" not the job but the "provision"... I have learned allot, yet I do miss the being alone some-what, I don't miss the waiting for a paycheck/settlement cause I got paid from the broker as soon as the load receiver called they got the load undamaged and well ahead of schedule. I am a person who doesn't need a "pat on the back" to get stuff done, and it sounds like you are... I got paid for allot when I were out working, I got paid to shut down whenever it were unsafe to drive, I got extra pay for allot of stuff most drivers don't get extra pay for, again, I guess this was my motivation driving me... have a good day, FYI, don't keep this going back and fourth, just stop with the commenting please, your comment was in my opinion, very NON-professional. Have a good day....

Also, Let us not forget there is a bit more to the pay thing than just the almighty CPM. Many companies pay for detention, extra stops, short run pay, etc. etc. Also, and this is a HUGE one.... if you have a good working relationship with your DM , many times they are given a lot of discretion for extra pay and perks they can divvy out to keep their productive drivers happy on the road. An extra $50 here or $75 there may not seem like much, but over the course of the year it does add up pretty quickly... especially when it's free money you get for being a valued professional with your support team at the terminal. As a rookie myself, I've had my DM go out of his way to take care of me with extra pay. Also, I've received great loads when others were sitting in the yard waiting.... I helped out my team by shuttling some trailers they urgently needed moved locally and was immediately given a 900 mile load from Alabama to Maryland, what made that run even better was the deadhead from Lakeland, FL to Pennington, AL was well over 550 miles. Some good money there, when I could have been sitting around waiting for a load at the yard. I know this example doesn't say much about the extra $$ perks I spoke about above, but is an example of getting taken care of when you are a team player and have a good relationship with your support team.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

It is ludicrous to me that a company would let a new driver train after only 3 months.

You are smart person passing on that "opportunity" to make money.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

you opinion driver, I grossed 170 grand in 2005-2009.... SO your saying what exactly, that YOU can't do that... LOL

I am NOT going to get into a financial debate over this, BUT just so this is said, I guess my personal motivation was more "driven" than yours. I did this, not you apparently. I have bought my wife's dream house, I have all my bills covered, I have savings of a unique sum, and I have a life that most dream of... like it or NOT... but my comment stands, IF you don't like your life than change it, I also negotiated my payment to pay me when I left the "house" til I got back to my house truck and trailer. most don't do this, but again I guess my motivation wasn't to be driving forever. I could afford to hire an attorney, CPA, Insurance that insured ME, and I have way more safe miles than most with all this being said, it comes down to your specific opinion over my experience.... and I guess you can have the "pride" but not the life, I shouldn't have to apologize to you or anyone for the life I chose... and frankly I'm NOT going to... again, if YOU don't like your life change, otherwise quit complaining... have a good day and be safe....

double-quotes-start.png

"The only way to make money being a driver is owning the truck?" Total BS advice from Ted.

So the close to $72,000 I netted in 2020 as a company driver, with zero out of pocket truck expenses on me, were a failure?

double-quotes-end.png

Big deal.

The opinion of the advice we push on here is for new drivers (The OP) to go as a company driver, stay with their first company for at least one year, preferred company sponsored training , and never lease. This is what has been put out for more than ten years.

Thanks for your stories.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

You're only running one business, Ted? Only one house? LOL. I don't post about my real estate, vehicles, business ventures, etc. because no one cares and it has little to do with trucking.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

After Teds first post I knew it was just a matter of time before he started spouting off BS.

Ted P.'s Comment
member avatar

YOU asked and pushed, I have many endeavors out there, shut me down in "lockdowns" I don't care I make money better than most, "bragging", you still drive? I retired...be safe....wink*

You're only running one business, Ted? Only one house? LOL. I don't post about my real estate, vehicles, business ventures, etc. because no one cares and it has little to do with trucking.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

#Useful

Ralph G. ( Arejay )'s Comment
member avatar

... but the actual "freight" is irrelevant, in the long run, the career is what is important for most, is the "making money part" not the job but the "provision"...

Uh, BUT the topic of this thread is about *pay* and how to maximize your earning potential as a driver....

... I am a person who doesn't need a "pat on the back" to get stuff done, and it sounds like you are... I got paid for allot when I were out working, I got paid to shut down whenever it were unsafe to drive, I got extra pay for allot of stuff most drivers don't get extra pay for, again, I guess this was my motivation driving me...

Good for you kind sir... I'm genuinely happy that you know what your motives are in life. That's a tricky one that many people take most of their life to figure out, and sadly there are some who never do.
Now if I may ask, I'm curious where in my comments I sounded like I was looking for a "pat of the back"? I simply relayed a first hand example of how I was able to stay busy and making money when other drivers were waiting. I took on an undesirable task that needed to be done and was rewarded for it with a good run. If that's what you mean by a "pat on the back"... well then, sign me up!!! I'll take em' every chance I get. :)

... FYI, don't keep this going back and fourth, just stop with the commenting please, your comment was in my opinion, very NON-professional. Have a good day....

.... but this was my first reply to this thread? Not sure how I'm keeping anything going "back and foruth"?
By the way, I'm legitimately confused about why or how you think that my comments are "very NON-professional"? Would you kindly expand on that statement with your reasoning?

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