I Really Really Really Hate Team Driving

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Zach 's Comment
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To everyone who says I should have stuck it out my DM and I talked and he says I'm just not trucker material and I should find something else to do in life and I agree with that completely, my lack of pre planing has caused me to be late to appointments numerous times. Sticking around isn't really an option since I already agreed to turn the truck in im just waiting on a load out to the terminal. I actually really liked the lifestyle out here and will miss it alot, I wish things could have worked and been different but such is life. I don't know why everyone is mad at me for leaving when I've already been repeatedly told this wasn't for me.

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I'm not trying to put words into anyone else's mouth, but I don't think any of us are mad at you for leaving. There isn't a one of us here that doesn't want to see drivers succeed.

I would highly recommend you take a look at driving B Class -- after I washed out in a similar fashion to what you're dealing with, I drove a trash truck for almost two years to get a steadier head and hand.

A CLASS B is pretty much useless in my area, the only way to get driving experience was through OTR

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

More excuses from poor Zach:

"I'll really miss this lifestyle". How do you know, Zach? You've been looking for any possible reason to jump out since you started with Western Express. You have complained about how awful it is in every topic you started on here. Laughable.

Want to know why you supposedly cannot become a success story driving for Western Express or any other employer?

Look in the mirror. Every possible thing is available for you to succeed and you just can't succeed, though?

You are the reason, not a co-driver, not a DM , not Western Express. You.

I take it personal when countless drivers offer an infinite amount of advice, assistance, encouragement, and motivation to someone that won't even try to learn this craft.

Done with this one.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

There's nothing to apologize for Anne. The best part about a forum is differing views and life experiences help shape our opinions. Differing opinions is a good thing as long as its done in a respectful, no name calling way smile.gif

Thanks, Rob T ~ means a lot . . . kinda felt like you're not fond of me; I know Pack Rat isn't, haha! Seriously, I'm the only 'trucker's wife/trucker's life' on here, and maybe I can help somebody someday somehow, right? ONE more year 'til my son ages UP .. and then it's MY turn!!

I missed the Cali part ~ FAB goes as far as WI, and they are 'desperate' there. I suggested YOU and RAY (PapaPig) as well.. foodstuffs is more regimented. Tom & I have a great friend in CLE that drives for GFS and is TERRIFIED to go OTR for exactly these reasons; he's 25.

Just trying to help; thanks for understanding. .

Zach's avatar just makes me wanna hug him.. like a kiddo !! I try.

~ Anne ~

ps: Jammer, you have such a HUGE heart as well, good sir. Just saying. Thanks!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Anne- since you keep taking jobs at me in various threads for I don't know what, you are now correct.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Thanks, Rob T ~ means a lot . . . kinda felt like you're not fond of me;

Don't think like that! I love how you are able to help some of us see things from the "at home half" side, as well as better assist those whose spouse is driving. We all have life experiences to shape our views that truly makes this the greatest forum online. I can honestly say there isn't a single regular commentator on this forum that I dislike.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Zach 's Comment
member avatar

Zach depending where in California you live Old Dominion, Saia, ABF, Fed Ex Freight, and YRC may be option if linehaul interests you.

If you're interested in trying OTR elsewhere else use this link to Apply For Truck Driving Jobs. You're gonna end up going out with a trainer again but it sounds like that's what you need. CFI, swift, Schneider, werner may also be worth a shot. CRST is all team so don't even bother with them. When I did foodservice work my manager had told me I didn't look like foodservice material due to being a heavy set guy. I did my damndest to prove him wrong and lost some weight in the process. Unfortunately I've since gained it back and then a little more since I left =(

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Again, if the seasoned hands get upset w/me, I'm sorry. I'm motherly; and for a reason. Kids that age.

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There's nothing to apologize for Anne. The best part about a forum is differing views and life experiences help shape our opinions. Differing opinions is a good thing as long as its done in a respectful, no name calling way smile.gif

I've already got a pre hire with SWIFT, but I think jumping ship isn't going to do much besides move me from one bad situation to another. If it didn't work out at Western it won't work out SWIFT

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Zach 's Comment
member avatar

More excuses from poor Zach:

"I'll really miss this lifestyle". How do you know, Zach? You've been looking for any possible reason to jump out since you started with Western Express. You have complained about how awful it is in every topic you started on here. Laughable.

Want to know why you supposedly cannot become a success story driving for Western Express or any other employer?

Look in the mirror. Every possible thing is available for you to succeed and you just can't succeed, though?

You are the reason, not a co-driver, not a DM , not Western Express. You.

I take it personal when countless drivers offer an infinite amount of advice, assistance, encouragement, and motivation to someone that won't even try to learn this craft.

Done with this one.

I've admitted countless times I'm the problem, that I don't have what it takes to be out here. I've said that I don't have the skills it takes to be successful in this industry, I'm not blaming my DM I'm just going off what he's said, I was just mentioning the conversation we had. It seems if I don't say what you want to hear you come back with a new way to jump down my throat. I take full responsibility for not making it in this industry so stop coming at me like I'm playing the blame game. Yes I originally played the blame game but I've taken full responsibility for it now, I guess I'm not allowed to have my own opinion if you don't agree with it, or maybe you just want a reason to jump down my throat because you have problems with me I don't know.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

Packrat says.... not the co driver, not the DM , not Western Express. He’s right Zack it’s not up to your DM if you can drive or not, if you can stay employed or not, when or how you can shower. You have also slammed both of your co drivers talking about how they can’t do there job. But than you talk about how you’re not cut out for this Now they are gone and you are done. None of it makes any sense. You comment in one post “my co driver accidentally pulled the trailer knob”. What??? How do accidentally pull a trailer knob? I think you are making somethings up here for whatever reason. Two questions I still have. 1. Did you ever reach out to fellow western express driver Jammer?

2. I thought Kearsey have great advice about reaching out to Safety. Did you ever do that?

More excuses from poor Zach:

"I'll really miss this lifestyle". How do you know, Zach? You've been looking for any possible reason to jump out since you started with Western Express. You have complained about how awful it is in every topic you started on here. Laughable.

Want to know why you supposedly cannot become a success story driving for Western Express or any other employer?

Look in the mirror. Every possible thing is available for you to succeed and you just can't succeed, though?

You are the reason, not a co-driver, not a DM, not Western Express. You.

I take it personal when countless drivers offer an infinite amount of advice, assistance, encouragement, and motivation to someone that won't even try to learn this craft.

Done with this one.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

My "problem"? It is people wasting time: my time, your time, the collective time of the group on here of all experience levels that tried in vain to assist you to no avail. Performing this occupation is not for everyone. It is actually for few; less than 1% of the population is a CDL holder.

Personally, I have a value of my time. I'm 65 years old. I served more than 32 years in the military before retiring, including many combat deployments to "assist" others. I had a heart transplant almost two years ago. I may not have much time left in this life, so it may irritate me when my time is not used wisely. We value all opinions on here, thus all that read here can learn. Your posts have truly become an invaluable teaching experience. Thanks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Zach 's Comment
member avatar

Packrat says.... not the co driver, not the DM , not Western Express. He’s right Zack it’s not up to your DM if you can drive or not, if you can stay employed or not, when or how you can shower. You have also slammed both of your co drivers talking about how they can’t do there job. But than you talk about how you’re not cut out for this Now they are gone and you are done. None of it makes any sense. You comment in one post “my co driver accidentally pulled the trailer knob”. What??? How do accidentally pull a trailer knob? I think you are making somethings up here for whatever reason. Two questions I still have. 1. Did you ever reach out to fellow western express driver Jammer?

2. I thought Kearsey have great advice about reaching out to Safety. Did you ever do that?

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More excuses from poor Zach:

"I'll really miss this lifestyle". How do you know, Zach? You've been looking for any possible reason to jump out since you started with Western Express. You have complained about how awful it is in every topic you started on here. Laughable.

Want to know why you supposedly cannot become a success story driving for Western Express or any other employer?

Look in the mirror. Every possible thing is available for you to succeed and you just can't succeed, though?

You are the reason, not a co-driver, not a DM, not Western Express. You.

I take it personal when countless drivers offer an infinite amount of advice, assistance, encouragement, and motivation to someone that won't even try to learn this craft.

Done with this one.

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He pulled the tractor break while I was in the sleeper, I don't know how he did that one its beyond me. No I never reached out to Jammer and I tried contacting safety and he didn't care.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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