I Really Really Really Hate Team Driving

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Rob T.'s Comment
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Zach i wish you the best in whatever you do next. The truth is you've been so wrapped up in what your co-driver is (or isnt) doing that its consumed you. You've resorted to the blame game and focusing on stuff out of your control over things you can. Tandems , trip planning and QC are all such easy things to fix. Had you come here looking for help resolving those problems rather than using it as a platform to vent i feel you'd have received more help. There's nothing wrong with complaining occasionally but when you don't appear to heed the advice after a while people stop being as willing. You have to remember that drivers on this forum are performing at the highest levels and VOLUNTEER their time to helping new drivers get started. Personally, if my time is limited I'm going to spend that assisting someone that will use the knowledge to fix the issue. We've had numerous members come through here that had poor training. After implementing some of our suggestions they've gone on to become successful drivers. Jammer has offered his contact info many times to help you out and I don't see anything suggesting you took advantage of it.

I agree with checking into Linehaul. You'll have a set routine for the most part which may be what you need. No need to trip plan You'll show up run to the same place every day and make it back to the same starting point at the end of day. Please keep us updated where life takes you.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I guess I have been blaming everyone and everything but myself for things going wrong. I've wanted this to do this for a long time but like everyone on here has said, I'm just not cut out for the job. I don't have the right attitude to be out here. A lot of my problems come from lack of trip planning and thinking ahead instead of relying on someone else to tell me what to do. I've improved tremendously since I first came in the seat and was scared of the truck, I'm actually a very gopd driver lol but I just haven't caught on to the other thing's quick enough like tandem sliding and pre-planning, my co driver quit a day ago and I have agreed with my DM to turn the truck back in early next week. Thank you for all you're help and guidance along the way sorry for being such a pain in the ass. Maybe one day when Im older and have more life experience I will come back out but for now it's probably best I find something else to do. This will be my last post here, you won't have to hear any more sniveling from me again. Be safe out there on the road.

That is indeed a shame Zach especially when you consider your team driving situation has seemingly worked itself out. Good luck.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Since you are solo give it another week or two before deciding, I thought I was the worst driver to ever set foot in a truck when I started.

If you still decide OTR I seriously think you should consider linehaul for a ltl company

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
KH's Comment
member avatar

Zach, sorry to hear that you're throwing in the towel, but I respect your decision. As others said, it sounds like strange timing seeing as the co-driver you were complaining about just left, but maybe there's more to it than you're telling us. In any case, good luck in the future.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Zach 's Comment
member avatar

To everyone who says I should have stuck it out my DM and I talked and he says I'm just not trucker material and I should find something else to do in life and I agree with that completely, my lack of pre planing has caused me to be late to appointments numerous times. Sticking around isn't really an option since I already agreed to turn the truck in im just waiting on a load out to the terminal. I actually really liked the lifestyle out here and will miss it alot, I wish things could have worked and been different but such is life. I don't know why everyone is mad at me for leaving when I've already been repeatedly told this wasn't for me.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

To everyone who says I should have stuck it out my DM and I talked and he says I'm just not trucker material and I should find something else to do in life and I agree with that completely, my lack of pre planing has caused me to be late to appointments numerous times. Sticking around isn't really an option since I already agreed to turn the truck in im just waiting on a load out to the terminal. I actually really liked the lifestyle out here and will miss it alot, I wish things could have worked and been different but such is life. I don't know why everyone is mad at me for leaving when I've already been repeatedly told this wasn't for me.

I'm one that is TOTALLY not mad at you; NOR am I a trucker. Just married to one. Tried it 6 months on a permit, WITH him. Tanks, and tough.

I'm with the others that are saying you should look into linehaul ~!! You HAVE the forward driving skills, you ARE young. So is Bobcat Bob, and so was Daniel B. when he started, AND REALLY, still is! He's the guy that made the pretrip guide on here. Started super young. Drives for OD now; even did FUEL hauling..twins.. at some point. (Rocky mt. doubles; not sure.)

I DO have a son your age from a previous marriage...I GET your indecisiveness and your lack of confidence; i totally do. HAVE YOU CHECKED OUT LINEHAUL ?? Zach, even FOODSTUFFS like Rob T. and Papa Pig do. Same places, same gigs, no time planning for the most part; its all set out for you.

Again, I either missed or don't know where you live. My husband and Don (on here) work for FAB Express. Daycabs, home daily off weekends. Same handful of places out of maybe 12, you'd get 2 or 3 a day.. and you'll know where, how, why, when. Mostly drop/hook...not all. You've probably got enough experience atm, that they'd take a chance on you.

Look them up.

Can't hurt.

I feel that you ARE a good driver; the shell shock of OTR just got you hemmed up.

Again, if the seasoned hands get upset w/me, I'm sorry. I'm motherly; and for a reason. Kids that age.

Seriously, look at Daniel B.'s training diaries. He almost quit a time or 2 also. I hear you on Western not working out; and I agree 100% with Bobcat Bob on looking into linehaul, or my guy's company. You are NOT a bad driver; you've said it yourself.

I'm glad you came back to follow up, and hope you still will, man. I get you. I do.

~ Anne ~

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

To everyone who says I should have stuck it out my DM and I talked and he says I'm just not trucker material and I should find something else to do in life and I agree with that completely, my lack of pre planing has caused me to be late to appointments numerous times. Sticking around isn't really an option since I already agreed to turn the truck in im just waiting on a load out to the terminal. I actually really liked the lifestyle out here and will miss it alot, I wish things could have worked and been different but such is life. I don't know why everyone is mad at me for leaving when I've already been repeatedly told this wasn't for me.

I'm not trying to put words into anyone else's mouth, but I don't think any of us are mad at you for leaving. There isn't a one of us here that doesn't want to see drivers succeed.

I would highly recommend you take a look at driving B Class -- after I washed out in a similar fashion to what you're dealing with, I drove a trash truck for almost two years to get a steadier head and hand.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Bro listen to what your saying my dm says I’m not trucker material and I agree with him?????I actually really liked the lifestyle????your finally solo and the only time you’ve sounded happ is waiting on a load to the terminal so you can quit??? Any ways like I said before good luck god bless

To everyone who says I should have stuck it out my DM and I talked and he says I'm just not trucker material and I should find something else to do in life and I agree with that completely, my lack of pre planing has caused me to be late to appointments numerous times. Sticking around isn't really an option since I already agreed to turn the truck in im just waiting on a load out to the terminal. I actually really liked the lifestyle out here and will miss it alot, I wish things could have worked and been different but such is life. I don't know why everyone is mad at me for leaving when I've already been repeatedly told this wasn't for me.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

No ones mad at you you want to leave I think maybe you need to tell yourself that everyone’s telling you good luck best wishes ????

To everyone who says I should have stuck it out my DM and I talked and he says I'm just not trucker material and I should find something else to do in life and I agree with that completely, my lack of pre planing has caused me to be late to appointments numerous times. Sticking around isn't really an option since I already agreed to turn the truck in im just waiting on a load out to the terminal. I actually really liked the lifestyle out here and will miss it alot, I wish things could have worked and been different but such is life. I don't know why everyone is mad at me for leaving when I've already been repeatedly told this wasn't for me.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Zach depending where in California you live Old Dominion, Saia, ABF, Fed Ex Freight, and YRC may be option if linehaul interests you.

If you're interested in trying OTR elsewhere else use this link to Apply For Truck Driving Jobs. You're gonna end up going out with a trainer again but it sounds like that's what you need. CFI, swift, Schneider, werner may also be worth a shot. CRST is all team so don't even bother with them. When I did foodservice work my manager had told me I didn't look like foodservice material due to being a heavy set guy. I did my damndest to prove him wrong and lost some weight in the process. Unfortunately I've since gained it back and then a little more since I left =(

Again, if the seasoned hands get upset w/me, I'm sorry. I'm motherly; and for a reason. Kids that age.

There's nothing to apologize for Anne. The best part about a forum is differing views and life experiences help shape our opinions. Differing opinions is a good thing as long as its done in a respectful, no name calling way smile.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
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