Paid CDL Training, 4,000 Drivers/year

Topic 29599 | Page 1

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CajunWon's Comment
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Rough numbers but, Prime trains 4k drivers each year on average. Yet they have 8-10k trucks. I hear so many good stories about this company. But this turnover level seems surprising. Hoping this is not unique to Prime.

Maybe not such a shocker since have also read that 95% new drivers wash out within a year.

otoh, I was in a call center of 250, and they hire close to that number each year - I was there 5+ years.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
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Turnover in all companies is high. I've met guys out here with 20+ yrs and they change companies regularly also. Personally, I just as soon stay put. I hate breaking in new doctors at the VA and new trucking companies.

Laura

Old School's Comment
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I hear so many good stories about this company. But this turnover level seems surprising.

You can't equate high turnover numbers to the quality of working at any trucking company. Everybody does this and it's not a fair way to measure what type of experience one can expect to have at any trucking company. This career is demanding. It certainly isn't for everybody, and a lot of people find that out the hard way. It is a remarkable career that requires remarkable people. Unfortunately there is a severe shortage of those remarkable people.

The problem with getting started at trucking is that there are so many people wanting to give it a try just based on reports they have heard of "high demand" for truck drivers. They think that makes it somehow an easy job to get with generous pay and benefits. Most of us have never really been involved in a job where they pay us based on our performance at the job. We are accustomed to being paid for how much time we spend at it. Trucking is a great equalizer in that it requires each member on the team to pull their own weight. A slacker becomes obvious when he has to produce something worth being rewarded for. If he can only produce mediocrity he suffers the payout for mediocrity. It makes no difference how many hours he spent producing little to nothing, he is rewarded only for what he can produce. That is the trouble with trucking, and it is also the beauty of it.

Prime has some great drivers who are making bank each week. It also has it's share of slackers who can't seem to be productive. Those less productive individuals will wash out. It is a continual process of self elimination. Each trucking company suffers through this. It has nothing to do with the quality of the company. It is all about the individuals who are making an attempt at this career. Some do it well. Others just can't ever seem to grasp the concept of performance based pay. You can find them all over the internet. They are the individuals who speak out loudly and defiantly of the evils of the trucking industry. You will recognize them by their bold claims of indentured servitude and other such ridiculous claims. I recently saw an individual making such outrageous claims against the same company that had just issued my W-2 indicating I had earned slightly over 100,000 dollars! Imagine my surprise as I read the report claiming they were running a "sweat shop like atmosphere."

Trucking will always have it's detractors. They are the folks who never had the gumption to make it work for them. It's not an easy job to break into. That is the problem. If you read this forum often you will hear how many people struggle at this. You will also hear people who love the way they are rewarded for their ability to overcome the issues that we all face. High turnover rates have nothing to do with company management in trucking. It is all based on the drivers ability to succeed or not. These companies all try hard to get and keep great drivers. They do what they can to train them well, but ultimately the drivers make their own destiny. The companies must have a good solid core group of drivers to be profitable. They know that. You know that. It would never serve their purposes to keep their drivers so unhappy that they are always quitting. They do everything they can to keep a good labor force in place. Don't fool yourself into thinking you can somehow read anything into turnover rates. They should not even be on your radar.

Mediocrity Reaps No Reward

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
CajunWon's Comment
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Seems I've read that here b4 but very much appreciate the reply -not as concerned. This site could use a 'Like' button within helpful replies.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I would have to ask about that number. I dont believe it to be 4000 per year. During COVID. They pulled back a lot....down to only 30 a week at one point. So that number seems off.

At last I checked, our turn over rate was very low.....35%. They claimed it was due to the longer training, so solo drivers were less stressed and frustrated after upgrading

CajunWon's Comment
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Thanks Kearsey, Stated 'rough numbers' as was extrapolating from the class-action of 40,000 potential payouts over 10 years. fwiw: the class-action is a non issue imo.

Empowered after passing the CLP : plan for now to complete 2020 taxes and thinking that completing 3 months at current gig will be of benefit (5 years + 5 years + 3 months); someday aspire to post advice on this forum, for now appreciative of the tough reality others espouse.

Weighing between Roehl and Prime reminds me of a Hee-Haw sketch "That's good right, no that's bad"

Roehl: paid from day 1 at $500/week, That's good! No, that's bad since Prime's higher cpm after TNT will more than make-up the difference. More money over 12 months at Prime -that's good! no that's bad since TNT is viewed by most as 50k miles of team driving where the student is valued as an 11 hour clock with potential of limited training causing many to drop-out. (our Kearsey and a few others the exception).

Roehl has mandatory driver facing cameras, that's bad. No, that's good, can help prove innocence in traffic citations.

Roehl territory appears to be mainly East of the Mississippi, closer to home is good! No,that's bad if a goal is to see the lower 48 & smaller region could mean less weekly miles.

Roehl advertises more home-time, that's good! No that's bad, like all companies they need to maximize revenue per truck and will agree to 'let you leave' if you can't stay out 14 days. Besides have to roll to earn, so home-time becomes a non-issue.

Roehl still trains on std transmission, that's Good! No that's bad: adds a level of complexity fast becoming irrelevant in new auto fleets.

The other interest is Millis, but would have to park at terminal for home-time: 70+ miles away. And Millis is exclusively Eastern US.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14ยข per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

PackRat's Comment
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Why would you need to park at a terminal for Millis? I never did when I was there. If that policy has changed, that would have been 200 plus miles, one direction, for new to get home.

Parked 2.3 miles from house.

0466377001612986534.jpg

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CajunWon's Comment
member avatar

Re Millis home-time parking: I've read so much, some details are a blur. But read someone was required to leave the truck within 150 miles. Doesn't mean this is a rule, but my impression is Millis is more restrictive than others, specifically mentioning damage while parked is drivers' responsibility. Could apply equally to other carriers, but I haven't read of this.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I did a similar comparison on here for others years ago. At the time it came out to be almost the same amount of money....

However...now at 30k team miles, prime offers the chance to go company team for 120 days. Yes you would be teaming but with an equal not a trainer. You would also be getting the team pay....which is a 55cpm split...with a progressive bonus structure going up to 85cpm PLUS the other bonuses such as on time delivery, safety, wellness, fuel and more. In the end, some individuals are averaging 40 to 44cpm for ALL miles. I believe them cause I was at 42cpm when I had my boyfriend on the truck.

I have team company driver friends in their first year who are making $1800 to $2000 gross per week. Teams have been being placed in brand new Pete's with EPUs.

This is an option to consider. But also consider Roehl may have more flexible home time for you. Of course, if you complete the contract at one, you could always try the other later. I have found many people chose a company and are satisfied because they don't know what they don't know. It is only when they talk to others who promise the moon and chest thump that they wish to change.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Epus:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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