Thoughtfull.

Topic 29666 | Page 4

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Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

No not at all

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The reason I’m going team with the flatbed is because the work will be easier and take less time as opposed to one person doing it.

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How's that going to work as far as the driver who's supposed to be resting getting their 10 hour break? Will the other driver be doing work related duties while logged sleeper/off duty? Thats a huge no no if its caught.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

Can you further explain than? Because Rob T had a very valid point. Im also curious as to how that would work.

No not at all

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double-quotes-start.png

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The reason I’m going team with the flatbed is because the work will be easier and take less time as opposed to one person doing it.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

How's that going to work as far as the driver who's supposed to be resting getting their 10 hour break? Will the other driver be doing work related duties while logged sleeper/off duty? Thats a huge no no if its caught.

double-quotes-end.png
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The reason I’m going team with the flatbed is because the work will be easier and take less time as opposed to one person doing it.

double-quotes-end.png

How's that going to work as far as the driver who's supposed to be resting getting their 10 hour break? Will the other driver be doing work related duties while logged sleeper/off duty? Thats a huge no no if its caught.

You just summed up the life of a TNT trainer, Rob. rofl-3.gif

Yes. I know it's different for a trainer. Just making a funny.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

If you adhere to a 14-hour clock, it will be difficult for both drivers to load and unload.

I'm flatbed at Prime and in TNT you run teams. My trainer and I both loaded and unloaded, but we did not adhere to the 14-hour clock.

Typical schedule for flatbed is driver 1 drives 3 hours to shipper. Two hours total turn around time (both drivers on duty while loading). Driver 1 driver 1 finishes his 8 hours of driving, but because driver 2 started his 14 hour clock 10 hours ago (when he was loading), even with the new rule driver 2 only has 7 hours left on his 14 hour clock. Or he would wait two more hours to get his full 14 hour clock back.

Now for the next load you will deliver in the morning, drive up to 4 hours to the next shipper , and then pick up another load. So 2 hours to unload, 4 hours driving, 2 hours to load. If the driver who drove to the receiver, also drove to the next shipper, how much time does the next driver have to drive a shift?

Even if you disregard to the 14-hour clock, and then just load and unload off duty, you will have some BRUTALLY long days. With the new rule I have 17-hour days, and those feel like a vacation compared to the schedule I ran in TNT.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

You broke that down perfectly along the lines I was thinking of doing this with my co driver. But can you explain that 17 hour rule to me a little bit?

If you adhere to a 14-hour clock, it will be difficult for both drivers to load and unload.

I'm flatbed at Prime and in TNT you run teams. My trainer and I both loaded and unloaded, but we did not adhere to the 14-hour clock.

Typical schedule for flatbed is driver 1 drives 3 hours to shipper. Two hours total turn around time (both drivers on duty while loading). Driver 1 driver 1 finishes his 8 hours of driving, but because driver 2 started his 14 hour clock 10 hours ago (when he was loading), even with the new rule driver 2 only has 7 hours left on his 14 hour clock. Or he would wait two more hours to get his full 14 hour clock back.

Now for the next load you will deliver in the morning, drive up to 4 hours to the next shipper , and then pick up another load. So 2 hours to unload, 4 hours driving, 2 hours to load. If the driver who drove to the receiver, also drove to the next shipper, how much time does the next driver have to drive a shift?

Even if you disregard to the 14-hour clock, and then just load and unload off duty, you will have some BRUTALLY long days. With the new rule I have 17-hour days, and those feel like a vacation compared to the schedule I ran in TNT.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

You broke that down perfectly along the lines I was thinking of doing this with my co driver. But can you explain that 17 hour rule to me a little bit?

double-quotes-start.png

If you adhere to a 14-hour clock, it will be difficult for both drivers to load and unload.

I'm flatbed at Prime and in TNT you run teams. My trainer and I both loaded and unloaded, but we did not adhere to the 14-hour clock.

Typical schedule for flatbed is driver 1 drives 3 hours to shipper. Two hours total turn around time (both drivers on duty while loading). Driver 1 driver 1 finishes his 8 hours of driving, but because driver 2 started his 14 hour clock 10 hours ago (when he was loading), even with the new rule driver 2 only has 7 hours left on his 14 hour clock. Or he would wait two more hours to get his full 14 hour clock back.

Now for the next load you will deliver in the morning, drive up to 4 hours to the next shipper , and then pick up another load. So 2 hours to unload, 4 hours driving, 2 hours to load. If the driver who drove to the receiver, also drove to the next shipper, how much time does the next driver have to drive a shift?

Even if you disregard to the 14-hour clock, and then just load and unload off duty, you will have some BRUTALLY long days. With the new rule I have 17-hour days, and those feel like a vacation compared to the schedule I ran in TNT.

double-quotes-end.png

With the new rule for 8/2 or 7/3 split sleeper birth, the 2 or 3 hour does not count against your 14-hour clock and effectively extends your 14-hour clock. So, if I arrive at a shipper or receiver, but have to wait long enough to where I'm off duty for 2 or 3 hours, I can still maximize my 11 hour clock as follows:

0500: on-duty pretrip and then drive to shipper. At this point my 14-hour clock ends at 1900.

0600: arrive at shipper and wait for 3 hours. Off-duty or sleeper.

0900: load and secure.

1100: Drive.

1630: 30-minute break.

1700: drive

1900: without the 3 hour extension for being off-duty, my 14-hour clocks ends and I have to stop for a 10-hour break. At this point, I've only used 8.5 hours of my 11-hour drive clock. But because of the extension, I can drive until 2200.

2130: My 11-hour drive clock runs out and I stop for the night.

So, with a 3-hour extension, my 14-hour clock becomes a 17-hour clock.

But this is when driving solo.

The brutally long days you will encounter as a team are as follows. Let's say that your stick to a 12-hour shift. One driver starts at 0600 and his shift ends at 1800. The other driver has a shift from 1800 to 0600.

The "night" driver, drives through the night to arrive at the shipper at 0600. Let's say you get unloaded right way. Total turn around time is 2 hours. The "day" driver drives to the next shipper, getting there about 11:00. Let's say total turn around time is again 2 hours. Now you're at 1300. The night driver has had maybe 3 hours in the sleeper (the 3 hours his co-driver drove). Then 5 hours again from 1300 to 1800. The "night" driver hasn't been off-duty or in the sleeper long enough to drive. Okay, fine, you say that the "day" driver can until 2000, because his clock started at 0600, right? And the night driver can get 8 hours in the sleeper, right? Well, guess what? First, you can begin to see where how this planned schedule begins to shift, even with a good scenario. Before you know it, you sleep schedule is all messed up.

In addition, this a pretty tame scenario. While in TNT, there where several times where I drove through the night, delivered in the morning, tried to get a couple of hours of sleep, then unloaded in the afternoon (late), slept two hours, then drove through the night. So, I had two complete drive shifts, a load, and unload, all on 4 hours of sleep.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Eric S.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m going to be coming back to this a’lot but thank you for breaking all of that down it’s gunna be my reference point when I’m doing this job career/solo. Greatly appreciate it.

double-quotes-start.png

You broke that down perfectly along the lines I was thinking of doing this with my co driver. But can you explain that 17 hour rule to me a little bit?

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

If you adhere to a 14-hour clock, it will be difficult for both drivers to load and unload.

I'm flatbed at Prime and in TNT you run teams. My trainer and I both loaded and unloaded, but we did not adhere to the 14-hour clock.

Typical schedule for flatbed is driver 1 drives 3 hours to shipper. Two hours total turn around time (both drivers on duty while loading). Driver 1 driver 1 finishes his 8 hours of driving, but because driver 2 started his 14 hour clock 10 hours ago (when he was loading), even with the new rule driver 2 only has 7 hours left on his 14 hour clock. Or he would wait two more hours to get his full 14 hour clock back.

Now for the next load you will deliver in the morning, drive up to 4 hours to the next shipper , and then pick up another load. So 2 hours to unload, 4 hours driving, 2 hours to load. If the driver who drove to the receiver, also drove to the next shipper, how much time does the next driver have to drive a shift?

Even if you disregard to the 14-hour clock, and then just load and unload off duty, you will have some BRUTALLY long days. With the new rule I have 17-hour days, and those feel like a vacation compared to the schedule I ran in TNT.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

With the new rule for 8/2 or 7/3 split sleeper birth, the 2 or 3 hour does not count against your 14-hour clock and effectively extends your 14-hour clock. So, if I arrive at a shipper or receiver, but have to wait long enough to where I'm off duty for 2 or 3 hours, I can still maximize my 11 hour clock as follows:

0500: on-duty pretrip and then drive to shipper. At this point my 14-hour clock ends at 1900.

0600: arrive at shipper and wait for 3 hours. Off-duty or sleeper.

0900: load and secure.

1100: Drive.

1630: 30-minute break.

1700: drive

1900: without the 3 hour extension for being off-duty, my 14-hour clocks ends and I have to stop for a 10-hour break. At this point, I've only used 8.5 hours of my 11-hour drive clock. But because of the extension, I can drive until 2200.

2130: My 11-hour drive clock runs out and I stop for the night.

So, with a 3-hour extension, my 14-hour clock becomes a 17-hour clock.

But this is when driving solo.

The brutally long days you will encounter as a team are as follows. Let's say that your stick to a 12-hour shift. One driver starts at 0600 and his shift ends at 1800. The other driver has a shift from 1800 to 0600.

The "night" driver, drives through the night to arrive at the shipper at 0600. Let's say you get unloaded right way. Total turn around time is 2 hours. The "day" driver drives to the next shipper, getting there about 11:00. Let's say total turn around time is again 2 hours. Now you're at 1300. The night driver has had maybe 3 hours in the sleeper (the 3 hours his co-driver drove). Then 5 hours again from 1300 to 1800. The "night" driver hasn't been off-duty or in the sleeper long enough to drive. Okay, fine, you say that the "day" driver can until 2000, because his clock started at 0600, right? And the night driver can get 8 hours in the sleeper, right? Well, guess what? First, you can begin to see where how this planned schedule begins to shift, even with a good scenario. Before you know it, you sleep schedule is all messed up.

In addition, this a pretty tame scenario. While in TNT, there where several times where I drove through the night, delivered in the morning, tried to get a couple of hours of sleep, then unloaded in the afternoon (late), slept two hours, then drove through the night. So, I had two complete drive shifts, a load, and unload, all on 4 hours of sleep.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

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