Best Backing Videos On YouTube?

Topic 29694 | Page 2

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Eugene K.'s Comment
member avatar

Davy the scenario you are describing is precisely what works on the backing pad during training, every time, to get you your CDL.

It just has no correlation whatsoever to the real world.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

You guys are way overthinking it. Backing comes with time. That simple. No magic formula or video will change that. Taking your time, and getting out to look. That is the most important part. Having patience. The second you let another impatient driver rush you. That’s when you will hit something.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I get that. Wondering, well actually obsessing, on if it could be made to work to real world situations?

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Bird-One suggests:

You guys are way overthinking it. Backing comes with time. That simple. No magic formula or video will change that. Taking your time, and getting out to look. That is the most important part. Having patience. The second you let another impatient driver rush you. That’s when you will hit something.

This is correct. You will get frustrated to no end. Bear with it, change only one thing from one try to the next. Changing too many bits and you won't know which one is good/bad. Learn from the last try and focus on getting it "this time".

As for Optical's Swift driver, that's not the Swift way for a couple of reasons. and it's not how to do the CDL Skills Test Alley Dock anyway. The Skills Test Alley Dock starts out in the middle of the lane, not next to the target dock. No dropping gloves or rolls of tape or spitting out the window. No lining up the driver window with the "dock boot" or a yellow line. Finally, the Swift instruction book says for the Alley Dock "Turn as needed", That is the complete instruction.

If it gets to be too much, take a break, walk around, watch others attempt. Remember, 3.6 million CDL holders in the USA (AllTrucking.com) did it. You can be one of them soon.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I know the one that really helped me....now granted I'm still not THAT great...but the SWIFT one was really good with showing reference points.

https://youtu.be/O8I0OwRHzUQ

I do agree that nothing will do better than figuring out your own little way. There is the basic overall techniques but building your own muscle memory will ultimately be the best.

Sure would be GREAT to UPDATE !!!

(Overall ... i mean ?!?!?)

~ anne ~

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Optical's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I know the one that really helped me....now granted I'm still not THAT great...but the SWIFT one was really good with showing reference points.

https://youtu.be/O8I0OwRHzUQ

I do agree that nothing will do better than figuring out your own little way. There is the basic overall techniques but building your own muscle memory will ultimately be the best.

double-quotes-end.png

Sure would be GREAT to UPDATE !!!

(Overall ... i mean ?!?!?)

~ anne ~

Nothing to update just yet. Lol...still out with my trainer right now. Though...plan is to be back at the yard for my upgrade evaluation Monday. So...once that happens I'll throw a post up. Haha. rofl-2.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Eugene K.'s Comment
member avatar

I totally get that backing comes with time and that no one starts off good at it, especially with only a month under their belt since having earned their CDL.

My company just assigns a “solo week” where you do lots of local deliveries around Springfield MO to gauge your ability to handle the shipping and receiving end of the job, before they officially upgrade you to solo OTR driver.

I have no illusions that a few YouTube videos will get me as good at backing with someone with years of experience. My concern is just that my backing is so terrible that they will determine I’m not skilled enough to complete training. I’m looking to improve as much as I can in the few weeks I have left.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
My company just assigns a “solo week” where you do lots of local deliveries around Springfield MO to gauge your ability to handle the shipping and receiving end of the job, before they officially upgrade you to solo OTR driver.

Part of the purpose of that "solo week" is to give you plenty of chances to get backing practice. Pretend you are doing a promo for Nike. Just Do It!

Eugene, you just need to expose yourself repeatedly to backing a semi. You are going to get the chance during solo week. You are doing great at most everything, but you are letting the stress of backing hang around your neck like a ball and chain. Quit stressing over it and practice it. It's going to be ugly at times. That is not what is important. What's important is that you do it. Get it done without hitting anything - that's success right now. Nobody is looking for you to look like an expert at this point. They just want to make sure you G.O.A.L. and keep yourself from hitting anything. If they decide you aren't doing well enough they will spend some more time with you. They aren't going to kick you to the curb because you back like a rookie - you are a rookie - they know that.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Shadow Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Eugene. Is it possible to communicate to "them" that you want and need more practice backing? If they want to terminate you because you admit you require more help in one are of your training to feel comfortable, is that really a company that you want to work with/for ??

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Eugene K.'s Comment
member avatar

Don considering how my company is ranked one of the Top 20 fleets to drive for, with the best safety record of its size year after year, absolutely!

Old School, you’re absolutely right. I’ve just been letting this week’s sleep deprivation cloud my judgment. Thanks for putting it in perspective!

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