Tips For Proper Seat Adjustment

Topic 29796 | Page 1

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MSgt C.'s Comment
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Any tips or links for proper air seat adjustment/set up? I have got to get it right, my numb-butt is killing...

Old School's Comment
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I recommend two things that are often helpful for rookie drivers.

1) Take your wallet out of your pocket. This is usually more a cause of back pain, but it may help you some with your numbness.

2) This may be the more helpful of the two suggestions. Keep your seat way down low. Most rookie drivers seem to think they will have more visibility, and therefore be safer, by having that seat pumped up real high. It's not so. I drive with my seat basically bottomed out. You want your feet flat on the floor so you can easily slip your hand up under your thighs just behind your knees. Having that seat pumped up puts pressure on the back of your thighs just above your knees. It cuts off your circulation and causes the numbness you are experiencing. Some people also experience the pooling of blood in their ankles because of this. If you notice your ankles swollen after driving for 9 to 10 hours you probably have that seat up too high.

Papa Pig's Comment
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I think oldschool is right in the money with this one. I was having back problems before i got into trucking and a chiropractor told me to try to have my knees elevated a bit when setting down. So i try to keep my legs at least parallel if not a little higher than my groin area.

Also being a little closer to the pedals helps. Having your leg stretched out can also add unwanted tension that can be problematic over time.

Along with the wallet I try to keep everything out of my pockets

I keep it low and close to the pedals and my back doesn’t give me any problems and I do a lot of manual unloading.

I don’t know how long you have been driving but it can take a few months for your body to get used to being behind a wheel for so long.

MSgt C.'s Comment
member avatar

I think oldschool is right in the money with this one. I was having back problems before i got into trucking and a chiropractor told me to try to have my knees elevated a bit when setting down. So i try to keep my legs at least parallel if not a little higher than my groin area.

Also being a little closer to the pedals helps. Having your leg stretched out can also add unwanted tension that can be problematic over time.

Along with the wallet I try to keep everything out of my pockets

I keep it low and close to the pedals and my back doesn’t give me any problems and I do a lot of manual unloading.

I don’t know how long you have been driving but it can take a few months for your body to get used to being behind a wheel for so long.

Just started my team time in phase 2 of training. So about 30 days in after a 14 year break. Maybe I'm not as young as I used to be. I don't remember this being an issue. But I'll try anything for relief. Since I'm removing my wallet anyway, are any of the cushions in the truck stops worth it?

MSgt C.'s Comment
member avatar

I recommend two things that are often helpful for rookie drivers.

1) Take your wallet out of your pocket. This is usually more a cause of back pain, but it may help you some with your numbness.

2) This may be the more helpful of the two suggestions. Keep your seat way down low. Most rookie drivers seem to think they will have more visibility, and therefore be safer, by having that seat pumped up real high. It's not so. I drive with my seat basically bottomed out. You want your feet flat on the floor so you can easily slip your hand up under your thighs just behind your knees. Having that seat pumped up puts pressure on the back of your thighs just above your knees. It cuts off your circulation and causes the numbness you are experiencing. Some people also experience the pooling of blood in their ankles because of this. If you notice your ankles swollen after driving for 9 to 10 hours you probably have that seat up too high.

The pain is right above my tailbone, a few inches below the center belt loop. Don't know if that helps the diagnosis. Lol

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

MSgt says:

The pain is right above my tailbone, a few inches below the center belt loop. Don't know if that helps the diagnosis. Lol

Take a close look at the controls on your seat (most trucks have several buttons on the left side of the seat). One should be Lumbar Support. That may help. And you don't need to show us where your center belt loop is, We'll just use our imagination.

KeepingOn's Comment
member avatar

I don't have nearly the experience of above posters, but I keep my seat as high as possible (as high as I can and still see well).

This might be due to a combination of long legs and back problems. If my hips are below my knees, it hurts to move my feet to the pedals, so I go for a rough 90-degree angle or slightly higher.

Like others suggested, I get my seat close to the pedals so my legs aren't stretched out, and make good use of the lumbar support.

I also change it all around slightly throughout the day so it isn't the exact same position all the time.

I can barely walk after driving a car for hours because no car lets me sit up fully. After a day in the truck, I feel really good...unless it was constant stop and go.

The specific area you are talking about sounds like a flexion issue between the Lumbar-5 and Sacral-1 vertebrae. You can hit youtube for great stretching/strengthening exercises, but it really would be best to get a quick doctor's opinion and referral to either an MRI to rule out a bulging/ruptured disc or a Physical Therapist to show you right exercises for your situation. Your back is just too important, do it right before it gets worse. Before you go see him, figure out if the pain gets worse/better when standing, walking, laying flat, laying on stomach, leaning back, laying on ground with legs supported on a chair at a 90-degree angle, etc. That will help him/her get a proper diagnosis.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I don't have nearly the experience of above posters, but I keep my seat as high as possible (as high as I can and still see well).

This might be due to a combination of long legs and back problems. If my hips are below my knees, it hurts to move my feet to the pedals, so I go for a rough 90-degree angle or slightly higher.

Like others suggested, I get my seat close to the pedals so my legs aren't stretched out, and make good use of the lumbar support.

I also change it all around slightly throughout the day so it isn't the exact same position all the time.

I can barely walk after driving a car for hours because no car lets me sit up fully. After a day in the truck, I feel really good...unless it was constant stop and go.

The specific area you are talking about sounds like a flexion issue between the Lumbar-5 and Sacral-1 vertebrae. You can hit youtube for great stretching/strengthening exercises, but it really would be best to get a quick doctor's opinion and referral to either an MRI to rule out a bulging/ruptured disc or a Physical Therapist to show you right exercises for your situation. Your back is just too important, do it right before it gets worse. Before you go see him, figure out if the pain gets worse/better when standing, walking, laying flat, laying on stomach, leaning back, laying on ground with legs supported on a chair at a 90-degree angle, etc. That will help him/her get a proper diagnosis.

With all these tips, why does it show, "Considering A Career"?

Do you drive now?

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

Any tips or links for proper air seat adjustment/set up? I have got to get it right, my numb-butt is killing...

I raise or lower my seat depending upon the angle of the sun :)

MSgt C.'s Comment
member avatar

I sat lower this shift. Knees slightly above hips. Seemed to be less numbing of the old hind quarters. I dont know much about anatomy, but today was better. No wallet as well ;)

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