Pepsi Vs American Furniture Warehouse

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Montana O.'s Comment
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So currently I’m looking for some information on two companies Pepsi and American Furniture Warehouse. If they’re are any current drivers that drive for them and can tell me they’re experience would be greatly appreciated also any pros and cons you think I should know.

Here’s the basic info of what I know so far:

Pepsi: Home Daily Start time around 5am depending on route Projected salary 68,000 Physical job unloading stocking etc Full benefits Vacation

American Furniture Warehouse: Pay starts at $0.47 cents per mile (CPM) and teams start at $0.28 (CPM) when on the road. $18.00 an hour for orientation and any hourly work that may occur (meetings, training, etc). Majority of the loads are drop and hook Home weekly 34 Hour restarts are done at home Paid every Friday Trucks run up to 75 MPH! Newer equipment Paid sick time Paid Vacation Rider policy (no charge) Pet policy (no charge) Blue Beacon Truck Wash Account to keep equipment looking good Department is managed by experienced ex-drivers who know the industry well Yearly safety bonus program Referral bonus program Layover Pay $18.00 per hour detention pay $100 per night breakdown pay Hotel reimbursement for breakdowns

Any additional information from others will be greatly appreciated I know it’s a long shot of finding someone that works for these companies here but though I’ll try TIA.

- Montana

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

PackRat's Comment
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Do you require being home weekly?

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

So currently I’m looking for some information on two companies Pepsi and American Furniture Warehouse. If they’re are any current drivers that drive for them and can tell me they’re experience would be greatly appreciated also any pros and cons you think I should know.

Here’s the basic info of what I know so far:

Pepsi: Home Daily Start time around 5am depending on route Projected salary 68,000 Physical job unloading stocking etc Full benefits Vacation

American Furniture Warehouse: Pay starts at $0.47 cents per mile (CPM) and teams start at $0.28 (CPM) when on the road. $18.00 an hour for orientation and any hourly work that may occur (meetings, training, etc). Majority of the loads are drop and hook Home weekly 34 Hour restarts are done at home Paid every Friday Trucks run up to 75 MPH! Newer equipment Paid sick time Paid Vacation Rider policy (no charge) Pet policy (no charge) Blue Beacon Truck Wash Account to keep equipment looking good Department is managed by experienced ex-drivers who know the industry well Yearly safety bonus program Referral bonus program Layover Pay $18.00 per hour detention pay $100 per night breakdown pay Hotel reimbursement for breakdowns

Any additional information from others will be greatly appreciated I know it’s a long shot of finding someone that works for these companies here but though I’ll try TIA.

- Montana

Howdy, Montana!! And 'again,' welcome (back) to Trucking Truth~! Six months gone, LoL....

Are you just now leaving Prime ?!?!? Why ?!?!?!?!

Anyway; no info on Pepsi, at all. Tractor Man delivered 'something' similar (or in that field,) but not sure. I've got some info on AFW, however. Our longtime member (who's on hiatus, idky...) worked for Swift a good amount of time, before switching over to AFW. Here are his diaries, of such ... for your perusal:

Pianoman / AFW

Pianoman AFW part 2

Stop back, if & when you can... and let us know!

~ Anne ~

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Do you require being home weekly?

....as I ALWAYS get BEAT, by a MOD !!!! confused.gif rofl-3.gif confused.gif

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I've been at Pepsi for a few weeks now.

Overall, I think it's a great company. Start times are between 4 and 6, depending on the route. Your stops are loaded in order and each stop has their own pallet/s. They say you work 4 10 hour days, but it's really 4 10-14 hour days with the ability to work a fifth, if you want.

Benefits kick in on day 1. They're fairly priced and I'm getting the same insurance I got at FedEx for a lot less. There is a 401K, but no match because there is a pension. You're vested in the pension after 5 years of service and the pay out amount is the average of your 5 highest grossing years.

Pay, I'm at 23 an hour and it goes up to 26.xx after I'm done with training.

The work is physical. Some stops you pack out, others it's drop and go. The drop and go is still physical because you have to down stack the pallet to bring them back to the warehouse. The worst stops so far are CVS and Dollar General. CVS is constantly changing where they want their products and changing the process of receiving. At Dollar General, you pack out everything. You're running around the store loading shelves and refrigerators with soda, Gatorade, orange juice, pure leaf tea, lipton tea, water and Starbucks drinks. Walk around a dollar general. Everywhere you see pepsi products, it gets loaded by the driver.

What I don't like is the equipment. I got spoiled at FedEx. The equipment is ok, but not as good as it was at FedEx. Orientation was unorganized. It's like they were suprised to see us. That's always a red flag to me, but I'll chalk it up to the people in charge of that instead of the company.

You get a company phone. It's an iphone. That iphone is your log and what you use to invoice customers. It's fully functional, which means you can use it as your personal phone, but nobody does because pepsi has access to everything you do on that phone. I suggest using it for only company business.

Any other questions, I'll do my best to answer and if can't, I'll do my best to get you the answer.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

Well I guess the cat is out of the bag Banks haha. I was gonna comment on your other thread soon seeing if you left or not.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I've been at Pepsi for a few weeks now.

Overall, I think it's a great company. Start times are between 4 and 6, depending on the route. Your stops are loaded in order and each stop has their own pallet/s. They say you work 4 10 hour days, but it's really 4 10-14 hour days with the ability to work a fifth, if you want.

Benefits kick in on day 1. They're fairly priced and I'm getting the same insurance I got at FedEx for a lot less. There is a 401K, but no match because there is a pension. You're vested in the pension after 5 years of service and the pay out amount is the average of your 5 highest grossing years.

Pay, I'm at 23 an hour and it goes up to 26.xx after I'm done with training.

The work is physical. Some stops you pack out, others it's drop and go. The drop and go is still physical because you have to down stack the pallet to bring them back to the warehouse. The worst stops so far are CVS and Dollar General. CVS is constantly changing where they want their products and changing the process of receiving. At Dollar General, you pack out everything. You're running around the store loading shelves and refrigerators with soda, Gatorade, orange juice, pure leaf tea, lipton tea, water and Starbucks drinks. Walk around a dollar general. Everywhere you see pepsi products, it gets loaded by the driver.

What I don't like is the equipment. I got spoiled at FedEx. The equipment is ok, but not as good as it was at FedEx. Orientation was unorganized. It's like they were suprised to see us. That's always a red flag to me, but I'll chalk it up to the people in charge of that instead of the company.

You get a company phone. It's an iphone. That iphone is your log and what you use to invoice customers. It's fully functional, which means you can use it as your personal phone, but nobody does because pepsi has access to everything you do on that phone. I suggest using it for only company business.

Any other questions, I'll do my best to answer and if can't, I'll do my best to get you the answer.

Well I guess the cat is out of the bag Banks haha. I was gonna comment on your other thread soon seeing if you left or not.

Yep, news here, as well~!

Congrats, Banks!!

~ A ~

Oz's Comment
member avatar

The region you work in for Pepsi is going to affect your experience. In Florida where I was working the warehouse. The drivers got a base pay amount for pulling out the gate and commission per case only. 5 days a week, sometimes weekends. The truck, pallet jack, and lay down will vary with how much the fleet tech(s) care. Personal experience and witnessed in action for that region, they do not fire anyone unless caught violating a no tolerance policy, they wait for you to quit. Petty much everything else stated above was the same. Best of luck finding somewhere that suits you.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Well I guess the cat is out of the bag Banks haha. I was gonna comment on your other thread soon seeing if you left or not.

I had to. Staring out the windshield for hours on end, looking at the same highways wasn't something I could do for the next 30+ years of my life.

Yep, news here, as well~!

Congrats, Banks!!

~ A ~

Thanks Anne thank-you.gif

The region you work in for Pepsi is going to affect your experience. 

This is true, but it's true for any company that has you going home daily. I learned that during my time at FedEx. You talk to people from other centers and it's like they work for another company.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

That’s the beauty of trucking. Something for everybody. Nothing wrong with staring out the windshield for the next 30 years. Nothing wrong with delivering direct to stores for the next 30 years. I experienced delivering to stores first, and I personally thought it was a nightmare. But everyone’s experience will vary.

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