Pepsi Vs American Furniture Warehouse

Topic 29878 | Page 2

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

My ex hubby is a "merchandiser" for Pepsi. A driver drops the load and he drives his personal car from store to store and stocks the shelves and builds the displays and stuff. I think pepsi does this for busier areas/ store locations.

Wonder if a driver can get a whole route like this? No stocking 😂

Banks's Comment
member avatar

That’s the beauty of trucking. Something for everybody. Nothing wrong with staring out the windshield for the next 30 years. Nothing wrong with delivering direct to stores for the next 30 years. I experienced delivering to stores first, and I personally thought it was a nightmare. But everyone’s experience will vary.

Couldn't agree more. And when/if I get tired of doing this I'll move on to something else. As long as my license is clean, there are no limitations.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Banks. How you enjoying dropping to the DG? Once you get used to doing it in a day cab we can get you a sleeper and a 53! 😂

Good luck! Hope you enjoy the new gig!

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

My ex hubby is a "merchandiser" for Pepsi. A driver drops the load and he drives his personal car from store to store and stocks the shelves and builds the displays and stuff. I think pepsi does this for busier areas/ store locations.

Wonder if a driver can get a whole route like this? No stocking 😂

They do it for supermarkets like Walmart and Giant. They do have routes that just bump docks and unload pallets for the merchandisers to set up. They're called bulk routes and they usually go to drivers with seniority. <

blockquote>Banks. How you enjoying dropping to the DG? Once you get used to doing it in a day cab we can get you a sleeper and a 53! 😂

Good luck! Hope you enjoy the new gig!

Thanks! Dollar generals vary by location. Some managers are a PITA and others say "where is it? Ok have at it" and they get out of the way. I'm sure you understand lol.

Wife is 100% antisleeper. Maybe at some point in the future lol. I applied to US Foods the same day I applied to Pepsi. The US Foods local to me only services chain accounts and they're everywhere from Massachusetts to Virginia. That means layovers. Wife said no, I said ok lol

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Montana O.'s Comment
member avatar

Do you require being home weekly?

No, I don’t require it but it’s just something that I’m wanting. Really what I want is to be home daily but weekly would also work. Hard to find a daily job with the pay that I’m wanting but these two companies peaked my interest. Being out a month at a time you miss a lot of stuff and lose a lot of time that I can’t get back.

I've been at Pepsi for a few weeks now.

Overall, I think it's a great company. Start times are between 4 and 6, depending on the route. Your stops are loaded in order and each stop has their own pallet/s. They say you work 4 10 hour days, but it's really 4 10-14 hour days with the ability to work a fifth, if you want.

Benefits kick in on day 1. They're fairly priced and I'm getting the same insurance I got at FedEx for a lot less. There is a 401K, but no match because there is a pension. You're vested in the pension after 5 years of service and the pay out amount is the average of your 5 highest grossing years.

Pay, I'm at 23 an hour and it goes up to 26.xx after I'm done with training.

The work is physical. Some stops you pack out, others it's drop and go. The drop and go is still physical because you have to down stack the pallet to bring them back to the warehouse. The worst stops so far are CVS and Dollar General. CVS is constantly changing where they want their products and changing the process of receiving. At Dollar General, you pack out everything. You're running around the store loading shelves and refrigerators with soda, Gatorade, orange juice, pure leaf tea, lipton tea, water and Starbucks drinks. Walk around a dollar general. Everywhere you see pepsi products, it gets loaded by the driver.

What I don't like is the equipment. I got spoiled at FedEx. The equipment is ok, but not as good as it was at FedEx. Orientation was unorganized. It's like they were suprised to see us. That's always a red flag to me, but I'll chalk it up to the people in charge of that instead of the company.

You get a company phone. It's an iphone. That iphone is your log and what you use to invoice customers. It's fully functional, which means you can use it as your personal phone, but nobody does because pepsi has access to everything you do on that phone. I suggest using it for only company business.

Any other questions, I'll do my best to answer and if can't, I'll do my best to get you the answer.

Thanks for all the info Banks, If I think of any more questions I’ll be sure to ask you.

The region you work in for Pepsi is going to affect your experience. In Florida where I was working the warehouse. The drivers got a base pay amount for pulling out the gate and commission per case only. 5 days a week, sometimes weekends. The truck, pallet jack, and lay down will vary with how much the fleet tech(s) care. Personal experience and witnessed in action for that region, they do not fire anyone unless caught violating a no tolerance policy, they wait for you to quit. Petty much everything else stated above was the same. Best of luck finding somewhere that suits you.

Good to know thank you

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Howdy, Montana!! And 'again,' welcome (back) to Trucking Truth~! Six months gone, LoL....

Are you just now leaving Prime ?!?!? Why ?!?!?!?!

Anyway; no info on Pepsi, at all. Tractor Man delivered 'something' similar (or in that field,) but not sure. I've got some info on AFW, however. Our longtime member (who's on hiatus, idky...) worked for Swift a good amount of time, before switching over to AFW. Here are his diaries, of such ... for your perusal:

Pianoman / AFW

Pianoman AFW part 2

Stop back, if & when you can... and let us know!

~ Anne ~

Anne, I’m currently still at Prime just weighing my options as I was looking for something to be home more frequently but hard to find the pay I want. I’m company so I only get 4 days out max. Unless appointments or something they’ll work with me. I was just looking for reviews as I don’t have a offer or anything

Primes a great company and my experience has been great from talking to the recruiter to being solo. Definitely would recommend anyone to Prime great company all around.

Also, thanks for the other threads I did read those was tryin to see if I can get some current reviews for AFW as the ones that I found were older.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Montana have you looked into LTL companies? You can be home daily and pull 100k+ if you do linehaul.

At least you kept that day cab Banks, them sleeper drivers ain't right in the head

smile.gif

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I’m curious Banks what would of been the difference between Pepsi and P&D with FedEx? I know nothing about P&D.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Anne, I’m currently still at Prime just weighing my options as I was looking for something to be home more frequently but hard to find the pay I want. I’m company so I only get 4 days out max. Unless appointments or something they’ll work with me. I was just looking for reviews as I don’t have a offer or anything

Primes a great company and my experience has been great from talking to the recruiter to being solo. Definitely would recommend anyone to Prime great company all around.

Also, thanks for the other threads I did read those was tryin to see if I can get some current reviews for AFW as the ones that I found were older.

No problem, Montana! I'm not sure if Paul (Pianoman) Wright is still with AFW or not; he's on FB and YT, which are also searchable . . . he's a great guy! He has Y/T videos of him on the piano, haha!

Have you looked into pulling tankers for Prime?!?!? Might be more 'regular' hometime . . . as I've heard their flatbed is, also. I understand, though. My other half put in his time OTR , for many years; and is quite happy with his intrastate/local job, as well.

Wish you the best!

~ Anne ~

Montana have you looked into LTL companies? You can be home daily and pull 100k+ if you do linehaul.

At least you kept that day cab Banks, them sleeper drivers ain't right in the head

smile.gif

^^^ This is a great idea, as well.

@Bobcat Bob . . . Estes by us is / was NEVER hiring, dangit. (Correct about the sleeper drivers, tho! LoL...)

~ A ~

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Montana O.'s Comment
member avatar

Montana have you looked into LTL companies? You can be home daily and pull 100k+ if you do linehaul.

At least you kept that day cab Banks, them sleeper drivers ain't right in the head

smile.gif

I have looked at a few, I'm currently studying so I can get my hazmat and doubles/ triples endorsements on my next home time, I already have tanker. Do you recommend any additional endorsements other than those? That's the only ones i've seen that I really need. Do you recommend any LTL companies personally? Also do you know if they run automatic trucks? Done research but get all types of answers. As I have a auto restriction, but currently trying to find somewhere to train manual and get it removed. I'm from Houston and seen they have positions available to apply for LTL ( Estes and OD ) I just have to get the endorsements first to qualify. OD also has P&D available outta Houston also do you have any experience with that or reviews that you have from other drivers, I've researched and read quite of few reviews but like any company it just depends on the area and specific driver him/ herself. What's your work to off time like? Is it a pretty good balance or more of drive got to sleep back at the truck in the morning?

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Anne, I’m currently still at Prime just weighing my options as I was looking for something to be home more frequently but hard to find the pay I want. I’m company so I only get 4 days out max. Unless appointments or something they’ll work with me. I was just looking for reviews as I don’t have a offer or anything

Primes a great company and my experience has been great from talking to the recruiter to being solo. Definitely would recommend anyone to Prime great company all around.

Also, thanks for the other threads I did read those was tryin to see if I can get some current reviews for AFW as the ones that I found were older.

double-quotes-end.png

No problem, Montana! I'm not sure if Paul (Pianoman) Wright is still with AFW or not; he's on FB and YT, which are also searchable . . . he's a great guy! He has Y/T videos of him on the piano, haha!

Have you looked into pulling tankers for Prime?!?!? Might be more 'regular' hometime . . . as I've heard their flatbed is, also. I understand, though. My other half put in his time OTR , for many years; and is quite happy with his intrastate/local job, as well.

Wish you the best!

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-start.png

Montana have you looked into LTL companies? You can be home daily and pull 100k+ if you do linehaul.

At least you kept that day cab Banks, them sleeper drivers ain't right in the head

smile.gif

double-quotes-end.png

^^^ This is a great idea, as well.

@Bobcat Bob . . . Estes by us is / was NEVER hiring, dangit. (Correct about the sleeper drivers, tho! LoL...)

~ A ~

I'm from Houston I have heard of the regional flatbed at Prime, but don't think that's something that I would want to do. Thought about it but couldn't accept doing more work for the same amount of pay or similar. As far as tanker haven't looked into it as I believe most of Prime's intermodal is up north/ midwest area, at least that is what I see advertised and talked about at the meetings.

But I'm currently just doing research and will see what comes up the LTL mentioned by Bobcat sounds good too, just a matter of me getting my foot in the door with those companies. So far I'm at Pepsi and AFW but once I get my Hazmat and Doubles &triples I'll be able to look more into other companies. If I happen to make a move I'll try to post a review on Prime and the new company that I swapped too.

Also forgot to mention on last reply, I stop in at least a couple times a week and read the forums so I can learn, I just don't reply as i'm a rookie still and leave the vets to give advice to the newer drivers.

But thanks again everyone for the advice and I'll try to update if I happen to make a change to another company

- Montana

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

I know FedEx freight runs mostly automatics and they're slowly getting rid of all of their manuals. My building had about 3 or 4 manuals left in their fleet. They were all also going to change the policy of not hiring drivers with an automatic restriction, but I don't know if they've done that.

I also know that OD has a bunch of manuals and they won't hire you with that restriction on your license.

I'm not sure about the others, but they usually have that info on their hiring page or you can call to find out.

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