Wait Time...

Topic 29994 | Page 1

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DV ChiliMac's Comment
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Curious on how long one has waited to be unloaded: or loaded.

Currently at the Walmart Distribution Center, 3-4 pallets I had left in the trailer, appointment time was 3:30pm, and Iā€™m still waiting for that trailer to be unloaded.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Hang in there, Jose. That amount of time waiting is not common but, it happens. Longest I've spent in a door at Walmart is over 10hrs. It is annoying but, like I said, it is not the norm. Sometimes you can wait 24-30+ hours on certain meat loads. Again, not always but, it happens.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Curious on how long one has waited to be unloaded: or loaded.

Currently at the Walmart Distribution Center, 3-4 pallets I had left in the trailer, appointment time was 3:30pm, and Iā€™m still waiting for that trailer to be unloaded.

Find out from your company when they start paying detention. It will vary from shipper/receiver to shipper/receiver. You will have to notify them by Electronic msg when you pass the time frame.

Most WalMarts I've been to have been late loading/unloading by 2.5-3 hrs. Lately they have shortened that time to an hour. They usually figure a truck with live load/unloads will be in the door for 4 hrs.

Laura

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Don's Comment
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The longest I have ever waited to get unloaded has been about 3 hours. Thankfully, that has only happened a couple of times. We don't get paid detention during the first 90 minutes. I really dislike that policy.

PackRat's Comment
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My personal record for a dry van unload was at a Meijer DC some place in Michigan: 14 hours in the dock!

Longest time at a shipper for a scheduled appointment was 28 hours. I picked up a trailer that was a full day behind being loaded.

For me pulling dry vans, anything having to do with a grocer warehouse/DC makes me cringe.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I had a grocery warehouse, Kroger, that took 26 hrs to unload me one time. There was the FedEx in Olathe that had me there for 18 hrs. The Meat plant in Greeley is well known for getting a 34 in there. I was lucky only had to wait 12 hrs. Theres lots of places that will get behind for one reason or another and we drivers just have to deal with it.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

The longest I have ever waited to get unloaded has been about 3 hours. Thankfully, that has only happened a couple of times. We don't get paid detention during the first 90 minutes. I really dislike that policy.

Yes, you do. For example, if you are at the consignee for 3 hours; you'll get paid detention for the FULL 3 (including that 1st 90 minutes.) Tom does, anyway!

~ Anne ~

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Don's Comment
member avatar

šŸ˜…šŸ˜…šŸ˜…

I have never been paid for the first 90 minutes, and neither have any Wooster drivers that I know. The ONLY time I was paid the entire time at a consignee was when they sent me a couple hours earlier and I waited 3 hours. Then, I had to remind JB twice.

double-quotes-start.png

The longest I have ever waited to get unloaded has been about 3 hours. Thankfully, that has only happened a couple of times. We don't get paid detention during the first 90 minutes. I really dislike that policy.

double-quotes-end.png

Yes, you do. For example, if you are at the consignee for 3 hours; you'll get paid detention for the FULL 3 (including that 1st 90 minutes.) Tom does, anyway!

~ Anne ~

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

šŸ˜…šŸ˜…šŸ˜…

I have never been paid for the first 90 minutes, and neither have any Wooster drivers that I know. The ONLY time I was paid the entire time at a consignee was when they sent me a couple hours earlier and I waited 3 hours. Then, I had to remind JB twice.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

The longest I have ever waited to get unloaded has been about 3 hours. Thankfully, that has only happened a couple of times. We don't get paid detention during the first 90 minutes. I really dislike that policy.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Yes, you do. For example, if you are at the consignee for 3 hours; you'll get paid detention for the FULL 3 (including that 1st 90 minutes.) Tom does, anyway!

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-end.png

Maybe a talk w/ Jim bum is due? Happens here, per the 'me' secretary! (I check all papers and checkstubs; how I found YOU were a D.O.M. nominee, remember?!? I read everything!)

Now, you've got me on 'double check and check again' mode; but I'm pretty SURE it is.. here. Maybe they're shorting you ?!?!?

~ idk ~

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Yes, you do. For example, if you are at the consignee for 3 hours; you'll get paid detention for the FULL 3 (including that 1st 90 minutes.) Tom does, anyway!

~ Anne ~

Is that a company-specific thing, Anne? I don't think we get detention pay at Prime until after 2 hours, unless otherwise specified.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

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