Any Hispanic/Latino OTR Truck Drivers Out Here?

Topic 30021 | Page 2

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

From what I, as a white male, have seen race is really not an issue out on the road. Unfortunately you'll hear a bit of racism and disgusting comments on the CB but those same drivers just like to hide behind their radios. We call em radio rambos. Thankfully they get our of range quickly.. You'll deal with some people that cause problems because of your race but that can be said for everything else in life.

Unless you're blocking the scale or taking your break in the fuel island you'll find everyone just minds their own business for the most part.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

This job takes you all over the country. One thing you can count on is that you are going to find some rude people (other drivers, pedestrians, customers) wherever you go. Luckily, on the whole, rude people are in the minority.

I am a white man. I've had other drivers cut me off in fuel lanes, blow their horns, make rude gestures and direct dirty looks at me. Ive had customers ignore me and talk to me like I was an idiot or like I wasn't worthy of their respect. I chalk it up to them being a**holes. Plain and simple. If I was a minority I might think the reason for their rude behavior towards me was based on my race. That would be totally understandable. When someone disrespects you, it's only natural that you want to find a reason for it.

Don't let the a**holes bring you down. You/we are better than them. They can't determine your success or take away your dignity.

dirtydeeds's Comment
member avatar

My circle has been Ohio, Massachusetts, Delaware/Maryland, Virginia.

That's as far as work has taken me. My experience has been that truckers will help truckers. There are some that won't and that's ok. Nobody is obligated to help, but for the most part they will.

Since we're from the same place, I think I understand where your head is. NY, for as big and diverse as it is, is very close minded. Everybody thinks the same. You don't realize that people are different until you leave there. I look Hispanic and if I let my facial hair grow out I look Arabic.

When I left, I expected everyone to treat me differently based on the color of my skin and my features. The truth is, I was the one acting funny and projecting negativity. I was defensive, waiting for an attack that never came.

Growing up, I was taught that white people were privileged and that I would spend my life in the slums. The hardest thing I've ever had to overcome is that thinking. It sounds like you're still suffering from it.

The truth is, the country isn't racist. Are there racist people out there? Sure, but people are allowed to believe what they want and feel how they want. As long as it doesn't infringe on my freedom, I'm fine with it.

You'll find that shippers, receivers, truckers and people in general judge you by your attitude, your work ethic and sometimes by the name on the side of the trailer. All you can do is your best. Do the best you can with what you got.

This is some really great advice! Thank you! I’m not gonna let my dreams die from the fear i’ve been taught. This is an anazing community. I can’t wait to get out on the road! :)

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

dirtydeeds's Comment
member avatar

This job takes you all over the country. One thing you can count on is that you are going to find some rude people (other drivers, pedestrians, customers) wherever you go. Luckily, on the whole, rude people are in the minority.

I am a white man. I've had other drivers cut me off in fuel lanes, blow their horns, make rude gestures and direct dirty looks at me. Ive had customers ignore me and talk to me like I was an idiot or like I wasn't worthy of their respect. I chalk it up to them being a**holes. Plain and simple. If I was a minority I might think the reason for their rude behavior towards me was based on my race. That would be totally understandable. When someone disrespects you, it's only natural that you want to find a reason for it.

Don't let the a**holes bring you down. You/we are better than them. They can't determine your success or take away your dignity.

That’s good to know. I’m not really good in social environments and freeze up when there’s a rude confrontation. I guess I can just mind my own business and keep walking. Thanks everyone for all the great advice!

Mountain Matt's Comment
member avatar

I chalk it up to them being a**holes. Plain and simple. If I was a minority I might think the reason for their rude behavior towards me was based on my race. That would be totally understandable. When someone disrespects you, it's only natural that you want to find a reason for it.

Don't let the a**holes bring you down. You/we are better than them. They can't determine your success or take away your dignity.

I think RealDiehl is spot-on here. You may occasionally deal with some racist jerks... but that's true anywhere. Sometimes people are rude and you may never know the reason. It's natural to wonder why. But you always have a choice to respond with resilience and dignity, not be thrown off your commitment to your goals or your professionalism.

Of the crew of four I supervise, two are Hispanic and one is Assyrian. While I'll never know what it's like to be them, I know that being paranoid and crumpling doesn't help (one of them did that for a while). Instead, ignoring the jerks and staying on your game with professionalism and dignity is the way to go. And of course we have each other's backs, simply because we're focused on getting the job done and get to know each other as people. Those that you work with, who are the only ones who matter (your dispatchers, etc.), will know you as a person.

On side note, you'll find Latinos all over the U.S. as you travel. Hold your head high, not just for who you are, but especially for what you can do.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bklyn Dreams's Comment
member avatar

I left nyc with the same fears + apprehension. Have I encountered racism? Absolutely. Have I lost sleep over it? Not one bit. You'll find the vast majority of the encounters you have out here will be amazing. Most folks are kind, considerate + friendly.

At the shippers + receivers? You just remain polite, patient & professional. You can only control yourself. Focus on being safe, on time + positive. It's a lot less stressful that way.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

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