How Does Local Driver Navigate Themself ?

Topic 30062 | Page 1

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Bob P.'s Comment
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Hi guys.Starting new local job in PA and will be delivering to NJ areas.Company doesn’t provide GPS( have mine) but little worry about driving to 6-10 new places daily.I have experienced w GPS OTR and as everybody here knows,they don’t deliver 100%. I don’t see it as big issue because you have more time to prepare for the road,check maps,necessary directions.But local new guy doesn’t have this luxury and specially time. I would like to ask someone in PA,NJ area who delivers,what is your best way to getting around?I spoke to few guys from company and they said they use Google maps.After certain time deliveries will be to same area to learn this routes.So if anyone has good tips what could be the best way please help.Thank you

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
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There is always the tried and true method of calling your customer and asking for directions. I don't drive locally, but I know the importance of contacting my customers. I talk to my customers more often than I do my own wife. I am a firm believer in good communications. I also like a good map.

I have experienced w GPS OTR and as everybody here knows,they don’t deliver 100%. I don’t see it as big issue because you have more time to prepare for the road,check maps,necessary directions. But local new guy doesn’t have this luxury and specially time.

I don't understand what happens to a local driver's time. If the job requires time to plan your daily trip then that's what you do. Start an hour early if you need to. That is much easier to deal with than having to get your truck pulled out from under a low bridge.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Build relationships with the drivers you work with. Ask them if they're familiar with the route you're doing that day and if there's anything out of the ordinary you need to be aware of. Usually, other drivers will be your best source of information because they've been there and done that. See if dispatch has your route ready the night before and start planning that night.

Stevo Reno's Comment
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New Joisey yuck VGL with that state lol

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Banks has it completely right-your fellow drivers are going to be your greatest asset for directions. Run google maps too, because you're right too, the trucker's gps and atlas will not get you right down into the side streets you're going to be on. Starting local, I knew the main routes that would get me in the general vicinity, then would use google maps to figure out a route in, then ask my fellow drivers if that route was feasible, and go from there. I was lucky a couple ways though, a 20+ year guy works my same shift and is always happy to answer any questions, and my company has spent the last ninety years building up "surveys" of every place we go to that has route info, contacts, hours, tank locations and sizes, and even the best way to pull in and unload at most places.

I understand what you're talking about not having time to trip plan-my loads are often not dispatched before my start time, so I'd just plan the first leg, then during the load/unload, plan the next leg, and so on. I'd never plan the whole trip right at the start since we often have to switch stops throughout the shift. It gets easier though as you become more familiar with the area, just keep at it. Don't look at your whole stack of work at the start of the shift (other than for a quick overview) and get overwhelmed trying to plan it all out, just take it in small chunks, and keep working through it until you're done.

I'd also be very careful calling the customers for directions, don't know how many times I've gotten someone that know how they get to work in their car, but has no idea about truck routes.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

I use Google Maps in conjunction with my Garmin GPS. I'll find the specific driveway where I need to arrive on Google Maps in satellite view and then drop a pin directly in my Garmin Smart Connect app at that spot.

Also as others have said calling the receiver is always a good idea. And usually I will have the satellite view open when I'm talking to the receiver so that I can get them to pinpoint exactly where I need to go.

Bob P.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you.That’s what I’m going to do

Build relationships with the drivers you work with. Ask them if they're familiar with the route you're doing that day and if there's anything out of the ordinary you need to be aware of. Usually, other drivers will be your best source of information because they've been there and done that. See if dispatch has your route ready the night before and start planning that night.

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