Is This How Pto Normally Works?

Topic 30140 | Page 1

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M M.'s Comment
member avatar

My boss sent a message to all the drivers and I was wondering if this is how this normally works.

"To all drivers: As a company that has an 8 day 70 hour clock we cannot have specific guaranteed days off. We do our best to get you home part or all of the weekend and try to work around all the life events that happen, but I just want to make sure we are all on the same page. If you need a certain day off, please put a request in."

So, what the situation is turning into is that if there is ever a day you need off, for anything, you have to use pto for that day. Another example being if you take a week off, you use 7 days of pto, even if it is the days you would normally have off. I'm new to this industry and this is all just confusing to me and I wanted to make sure I was understanding this.

Sid V.'s Comment
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Please tell me how it feels to have your time off paid.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I don't see anything in that message indicating that you have to use your PTO for a day off. It simply states that they are having difficulties scheduling your days off when you want them. They want you to put in a request for specific days so they can try to get them for you. There was no mention of PTO being used for days off. I generally work about four or five weeks before taking any time off, but I have to put in a request for those specific days. That way my dispatcher can plan and schedule things so that we make sure our customer's expectations are met.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
M M.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't see anything in that message indicating that you have to use your PTO for a day off.

When I went and asked questions about it my boss told me that I would have to request the days off using pto. That was separate from the message.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I get PTO when I ask for it. I take unpaid time off when I ask for it. They are two separate things. I have never been forced to make them coincide with each other as though they were the same.

My gut feeling tells me you are confused.

Are you an over the road driver? I have no idea how time off works for a local driver.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Ralph G. ( Arejay )'s Comment
member avatar

If you have to use PTO time to request specific days off, I'm curious how much PTO time your company is giving their drivers each year?

From what I've seen, the vast majority of trucking companies are notoriously stingy when it comes to PTO and Holiday Pay. The company I'm driving for now gives 5 days a year and they act like that is generous. I contrast that with two non-union insurance companies I've worked at in the past where I worked doing IT support. I received 25 PTO days per year plus 8 to 10 days for company holidays.

M M.'s Comment
member avatar

If you have to use PTO time to request specific days off, I'm curious how much PTO time your company is giving their drivers each year?

We get about 7 days a year

M M.'s Comment
member avatar

My gut feeling tells me you are confused.

Are you an over the road driver? I have no idea how time off works for a local driver.

So, im home for 34 hour breaks and I drive the eastern half of the US. The boss says we aren't guaranteed days off. So, for example, even though I get a 34 hour break every week, I still use a full 7 days of pto for 7 days off, plus pto if I have to request a day off, even if it is on the day of the 34 hour break, because it isnt guaranteed. Rarely the 34 hour breaks are on different days, but the dispatch can decide whenever you get your 34 hour breaks.

Frankly, I'm so confused by all of it

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

My gut feeling tells me you are confused.

Are you an over the road driver? I have no idea how time off works for a local driver.

double-quotes-end.png

So, im home for 34 hour breaks and I drive the eastern half of the US. The boss says we aren't guaranteed days off. So, for example, even though I get a 34 hour break every week, I still use a full 7 days of pto for 7 days off, plus pto if I have to request a day off, even if it is on the day of the 34 hour break, because it isnt guaranteed. Rarely the 34 hour breaks are on different days, but the dispatch can decide whenever you get your 34 hour breaks.

Frankly, I'm so confused by all of it

Personally, I'd get clarification . . . in WRITING. My husband has 3 weeks accumulated vacation, but due to FAB's shortage of drivers, he is not yet taking one week; even yet.

He's asked NUMEROUS times if he could nip away a DAY AT A TIME .. here and there, for 'PTO' from his OWN accrued vacation, and the answer is NOPE. Sucks, but true.

For instance; he may need THIS Monday off (or going in super late) for a few appointments.... so, it will either be 'go in late for 1/2 day pay' or take the whole DAY unpaid. His regular dispo is out of the office; so we shall see. Either way, it's unpaid.

If YOU have that option, share more info~~!!!

Always wishing ALL you drivers, the best; shout out to Nathan S. << yes you !

~ Anne ~

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I am OTR , I get one day of home time, unpaid, for every 7 days I'm on the road. I also earn .27 days per week of PTO time that I can use as I want. At my company you earn more PTO per year the longer you're here. I don't know the levels.

My 34s happen where they happen. I get home when I request it.

Sounds like you have a regional job. Many of those have stricter rules for taking days off. Many try to get you home every week or two for a 34 at home. If you are requesting different or additional days off, they may consider that PTO time. It can be more difficult to get regional drivers home for days other than their scheduled time home.

What kind of job did you sign up for?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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