What Is The Purpose Of Nose Diving Spots At Truck Stops?

Topic 30186 | Page 1

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Zach 's Comment
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I see drivers doing it all the time and it makes no sense to me why someone would want to nose dive dive in to a spot. To me it seems like it would be incredibly dangerous and a huge hassle to have to back out of a spot like that

Errol V.'s Comment
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Reason #1: Laziness. Backing in between a Freightliner and a KW is more stressful than backing out into open space.

Reason #2: The reefer in the trailer next to you is not right outside your sleeper.

Reason #3: Going straight in is easier than a blind side back when the open spot is on the right.

Reason #4: It's 6pm and the lot is full. If you drive by to get set up and back in, another trucker might not wait and pull straight in themselves.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

KH's Comment
member avatar

This discussion has come up a number of times in the past, and I've annoyed some people by admitting that I was a nose-in parker and I don't care what people think. I found it kind of interesting that some people seem to be against it for no reason other than it's different than what everyone else is doing. Anyway, I did it entirely because of noise (and because of that I was told that maybe trucking isn't for me). I agree it does make backing out a little more dangerous, but I don't think it's that bad as long as you pick a good spot for it. I probably wouldn't just pull forward in to one space in the middle of a double row of spaces at a truck stop, but in some places there are spaces that just have a large open area in front of them.

I remember I did it once and another truck did it next to me, which annoyed me because it defeats the purpose, but I talked to the guy and he said he did it because he had a flat bed with 3 axels and it didn't back like other trailers.

Anyway, I agree that it's probably something that new drivers shouldn't do in general.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
KH's Comment
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*axles. At least I assume that's what he meant. There may have been 3 guys named Axel on the truck who had trouble with backing, but that seems less likely.

Nathan S.'s Comment
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This made me laugh harder than it probably should have rofl-3.gif

*axles. At least I assume that's what he meant. There may have been 3 guys named Axel on the truck who had trouble with backing, but that seems less likely.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I will on occasion nose in. Only on an end so backing out is easy. I have #s 2, 3 and 4 from Errol Vs as reasons, I don't have issues with backing so # 1doesnt apply. In addition I'll add, if it is slanted where my head side is lower I'll nose in just to keep from putting the pillow on the other end of the bed (it feels weird and I don't sleep as well like that). Also if there is a spectacular view over a ridge or the such I'll nose in to enjoy it while I'm awake. Mainly though I'll do it to avoid loud reefers. Take right now for instance, I just pulled in for a 10, the spot I chose is an end spot. I was faced with a dilemma, back in or nose in, I chose back in so my head side is higher even though the truck next to me has both a reefer and a tripac running. I've gotten to where I don't mind reefers much anymore unless they're in need of repair, better that than a busted air dryer cycling on and off every few minutes.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

1. Too tired and it's usually about 1-2 a.m. when I park, so can be really dark when I park. Usually less trucks in a truck stop during the day, easier to see and be seen when backing out.

2. Closer to grass/dirt for Monty

0858450001621705314.jpg Monty eating a T-bone from his favorite friend 😁

3. I run a reefer on continuous usually. Lets other have a quieter night.

4. Nunnya

Laura

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Jared H.'s Comment
member avatar

I don’t understand why it’s such a big deal with parking. I know I’m new to the trucking world- but, why does it matter?

For example- I park in a couple of independent lots on my runs... there will be 40 open spots and truckers will bypass all the empty spots to back between two other trucks.

I have been told it’s because then they don’t have to worry about others backing next to them, especially rookies.

I think it’s just an industry cultural thing- for me, I always look for easiest place to park... no matter what 🤣

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Reason #485.

I’d rather have someone hit the trailer than rip the hood off the truck.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Jared seeks understanding:

I don’t understand why it’s such a big deal with parking. I know I’m new to the trucking world- but, why does it matter?

For example- I park in a couple of independent lots on my runs... there will be 40 open spots and truckers will bypass all the empty spots to back between two other trucks.

I have been told it’s because then they don’t have to worry about others backing next to them, especially rookies.

I think it’s just an industry cultural thing- for me, I always look for easiest place to park... no matter what 🤣

The actual parking part is as we've discussed. However, when it's time to back out, the driver has ZERO visibility of what's going on in the driving lane behind him. Supposed said head-in driver starts to back out. Another driver passing by either doesn't see the trailer coming out or figures he's more important and continues driving past the end of a moving trailer.

Screee-APE! Who's fault?

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