Brakes Just Caught On Fire And Burned Trailer.

Topic 30213 | Page 2

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Banks's Comment
member avatar

You had a trailer fire and you swapped out tires and kept driving?

If your brakes went up in flames and it was so bad that the fire department had to put it out, why would you even consider driving it?

Did you put the truck in manual to lock it in a lower gear to help with the engine brakes and service brakes? What would you do if it was raining heavily or snowing and the engine brake isn't an option? You put yourself in a pickle here, but I'm guessing you'll be ok. I don't think a company that puts someone in the driver seat of 100k+ lb load on day two is the type of company that reports to Hireright.

You were lucky that you were able to stop and that you didn't kill yourself or someone else with that kind of weight and going down a mountain.

I went local out the gate because I wanted to be home every night. I went to FedEx Freight and did my training and first year and a half there. It's worth looking into. Top rate at FedEx is 30+ an hour (depending on location) with time and a half after 8 hours and you get the benefits too. Long term, for you and your family, that's the move to make. I don't know where you're located, but see if the center closest to you is hiring for Driver Apprentice. Since you have less than a year experience you won't qualify to be hired as a city driver or a road driver.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rad 's Comment
member avatar

After the fire department cleared the scene, the police officer was stressing that I get the vehicle off the highway. The police officer went ahead and called a tow truck. I called dispatch and let them know what was going on. I was told to not let the tow truck driver touch the vehicle, that they were sending their own company and were en route. The police officer was saying that the vehicle was to be moved ASAP and not to wait a minute longer. So I put the truck into low gear and crept out of the immediate exit, made a right and sat there in a gravel parking lot. The companies tow truck service arrived soon after. On the incident report it states that the police officers’ stow truck guy , towed the truck. That was not the case. I made it off the highway on my own. So there is already a discrepancy with the paper work.

Anyways I spoke with the property manager there and he said it was ok for me to drop my load there. I went ahead and got that done and unhooked the trailer and left it with the tow truck guys. The replaces the 4 tires before I unhooked and I bobtailed back home. I really don’t know how this will effect me going forward. I’m going to call my “boss” a little later if they don’t call me first. I don’t know how this is all going to play out. Fed ex won’t take me on this early especially if I’m not coming from an accredited school. Everyone wants experience and I’m like how am I to get that. I think this was a really good deal I had going on, but we will see. I had already cleared the little mountain route and I was on the highway en route to the city. I noticed the smoke on the highway so I pulled over just before the next exit. I would like to know what caused the brakes to catch fire if that was even the case. It could have been an inner tire that went and got out of control. Then again I’m not really sure. I just saw smoke. I didn’t feel anything, the gauges were fine, I had air, so I dunno.

You had a trailer fire and you swapped out tires and kept driving?

If your brakes went up in flames and it was so bad that the fire department had to put it out, why would you even consider driving it?

Did you put the truck in manual to lock it in a lower gear to help with the engine brakes and service brakes? What would you do if it was raining heavily or snowing and the engine brake isn't an option? You put yourself in a pickle here, but I'm guessing you'll be ok. I don't think a company that puts someone in the driver seat of 100k+ lb load on day two is the type of company that reports to Hireright.

You were lucky that you were able to stop and that you didn't kill yourself or someone else with that kind of weight and going down a mountain.

I went local out the gate because I wanted to be home every night. I went to FedEx Freight and did my training and first year and a half there. It's worth looking into. Top rate at FedEx is 30+ an hour (depending on location) with time and a half after 8 hours and you get the benefits too. Long term, for you and your family, that's the move to make. I don't know where you're located, but see if the center closest to you is hiring for Driver Apprentice. Since you have less than a year experience you won't qualify to be hired as a city driver or a road driver.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar
Fed ex won’t take me on this early especially if I’m not coming from an accredited school

Not true. You can apply to be a driver apprentice and they'll take you. They won't hire you as a City Driver or a Road Driver, but they'll hire you as a driver apprentice. I worked with a bunch of people that aren't through the program that got their CDL through company sponsored training and by borrowing a truck from a buddy. FedEx hired them as apprentices and put them through their program.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rad 's Comment
member avatar

Just wanted to update you all. The boss says they don’t feel I’m at fault. 🤷🏼‍♂️

Banks!!! I’ll look into that. It seems all of the FedEx jobs are out in New Jersey. I wouldn’t mind working for them. But this opportunity is as local as it gets. Aside from no benefits and such. I know I’m getting low balled with the pay, but I’ll take it.

I really do enjoy these this dump truck, nonetheless. You know I’m actually supposed to be making $40+, or so I’m told. It’s a Mack truck pinnacle trailer. It’s automatic . Brand new.

As to what I know right now. They are still investigating, but they believe it’s some sort of malfunction. I was told to give him a call on Monday. So I guess that’s good news. I’m just going to ride this out for the experience and hopefully earn a real decent living behind all of this with some good benefits. I swear to you guys I really do my best. The cab had front and driver cameras installed. I guess the were watching the tapes. I’m totally alert and serious. I don’t speed, tailgate or anything like that. I respect the road.

Thanks for all your attention and blessings. I know this is dangerous work, but I’m not going back to the office. I’m 40 years old and gonna just ride this out for the rest of my time , if I can. I’m gonna take this experience as a warning and just be extra careful out there. Slow, steady and alert. God bless you all.

I’m still a bit bothered about that accident report. I was never towed. I guess I have to wait 14 days to see what the officer wrote. The “boss” says that this won’t effect my license. I dunno. We will see

double-quotes-start.png

Fed ex won’t take me on this early especially if I’m not coming from an accredited school

double-quotes-end.png

Not true. You can apply to be a driver apprentice and they'll take you. They won't hire you as a City Driver or a Road Driver, but they'll hire you as a driver apprentice. I worked with a bunch of people that aren't through the program that got their CDL through company sponsored training and by borrowing a truck from a buddy. FedEx hired them as apprentices and put them through their program.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I'm still following, interest 'piqued,' Rad.

I hope it works for you, however which way. I still think Banks' FXF dealio is a better route. Wouldn't it be great to have bennies, WITH a 5 y/o?

You never 'did' state your location; we might have 'other' collective ideas for ya.

Lastly, could the mechanical failure have been related to that 'drop axle/tag axle?' Just thinking out loud.

Keep us in the loop, good sir.

Wish you well,

~ Anne ~

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

penn99's Comment
member avatar

I went local out the gate because I wanted to be home every night. I went to FedEx Freight and did my training and first year and a half there. It's worth looking into. Top rate at FedEx is 30+ an hour (depending on location) with time and a half after 8 hours and you get the benefits too. Long term, for you and your family, that's the move to make. I don't know where you're located, but see if the center closest to you is hiring for Driver Apprentice. Since you have less than a year experience you won't qualify to be hired as a city driver or a road driver.

RAD... Interesting story with the tire fire. Hope all works out for you.

Banks...

I have just looked and found an Driver Apprentice position available in my local area. Qualifications include: must have a CDL-A... or.... the CLP.

I am hoping you can clarify about the apprentice job with Fed-Ex so that I may better understand how their program works.

Does Fed-Ex put you through a specific CDL training program first, or, is a person trained as you go, via on-the-job training. A list of job responsibilities including various "non-driving duties" indicates a person may be working and training at the same time.

Sorry RAD, not trying to hijack your thread... just trying to obtain more info.

Thank you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

Unless I am remembering incorrectly, Scott has posted that FedEx Freight is now part of CFI and equipment is being rebranded.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

You are remembering incorrectly.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Unless I am remembering incorrectly, Scott has posted that FedEx Freight is now part of CFI and equipment is being rebranded.

That's UPS, Harv . . . but you were CLOSE,

YET... no cigar for you today! xoxo!

~ Anne ~

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

You are remembering incorrectly.

...and the master beats the student by ONE minute~!!!!

rofl-3.gif confused.gif rofl-3.gif

~ Anne ~

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