Just A Little Bumed Out

Topic 30285 | Page 1

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Mackerel (Mike D.)'s Comment
member avatar

So I am about 1 month away from graduating from CDL school. I have been putting applications out and patiently waiting for replies. I just finished a call with recruiting from my #1 choice. I was denied because of a 30 plus year old Misdemeanor. Hell, they let me join the Navy with that on my record...what gives....Oh, well moving on down the list...Thanx for being positive....Mostly this is just a rambling vent session....

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Hang in there, it only takes one yes. Some companies are more strict than others. Its possible that if you're unhappy where you end up going that they may be interested after you have a year of safe driving. You can use this link to Apply For Truck Driving Jobs and see who offers you a job. At that point I'd look at the offers you actually have and THEN decide what fits you best. If you don't mind me asking, who turned you down?

Mackerel (Mike D.)'s Comment
member avatar
At that point I'd look at the offers you actually have and THEN decide what fits you best. If you don't mind me asking, who turned you down?

I will say that it’s a MegaCarrier. Beyond that I feel that it is too soon, and in bad taste. But it was a company that offers the military benefits. My next choice pays more CPM , but doesn’t have the GI Bill benefits. :(

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

1980's movie advice still applies:

Mark Ratner: Well, naturally something happens. I mean, you put the vibe out to 30 million chicks, something is gonna happen.

Mike Damone: That's the idea, Rat. That's the attitude.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Well CFI loves former military. They take your past on a case by case basis.

Mackerel (Mike D.)'s Comment
member avatar

One of my favorite movies. When I was in the Navy, because I am from California, the guys in my shop called me Spicolli. Thanx Brody.

Mackerel (Mike D.)'s Comment
member avatar

I have submitted an application to CFI but not heard back from them yet. Guess I will have to get proactive and call them myself.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Mackerel, I know exactly how you feel. I got rejected multiple times when I was trying to get started. I'm not sure if you are familiar with my start, but I'll share it with you...

I labored hard over that decision of where I wanted to start my trucking career. I look back now and laugh at how I came up with the reasons I chose my first trucking company. They were shallow and ill-informed. I was a victim of the negative influences of those stupid trucking company reviews.

I had made up my mind to pull flatbed freight. My top choice for the company I wanted to work for was TMC. They are a fine company, and I mean no slight against them by telling you my experience with them. I chose them because of the beautiful Peterbilt trucks they have. Who wouldn’t want to drive one of those wonderful black trucks with all that shiny chrome? I also chose them because they insisted that you keep your truck nice and clean. They even had a charge account at the Blue Beacon truck wash company so that you could go get your truck washed each week. I liked that idea of always being seen in a nice clean truck! As you can see I was more concerned with image than I was with productivity. I thought I would look really cool in one of those nice shiny black trucks!

It’s almost as embarrassing to admit how shallow my preferences were, as it is to admit they rejected me. I got sent home from TMC orientation twice! That’s right - twice! Two different times they invited me up there to Des Moines, Iowa and I got sent home both times. Then on my third attempt at landing my first trucking job I got sent home from the orientation I attended at PGT. They were my third try at landing a flatbed trucking job, and I failed again! So, here’s another thing to think about when considering this question of what is the best place to start a trucking career. We said it earlier. The best place to start is the place who will hire you and give you a shot at this rewarding career. If there is someone out there who is willing to let you prove you can handle this job, then get in there and show them what you are made of. That’s how it works in this industry. Somebody gives you a chance, and you strap yourself onto the bull and ride it out. You don’t act arrogantly as though you are above this “starter company.” You show some gratitude and some fortitude and you get in there and make something happen.

Guess where I landed after those first three times of getting thrown off the bull? I made a call to Western Express and they agreed to bring me in for orientation for a flatbed driving job. Of all the companies out there who had terrible reviews on the internet, they had to be the worst case scenario. I was scared. I was literally getting sick to my stomach at times. I didn’t know what else to do. I had been thoroughly rejected at those other places, and I needed a job badly. I also needed a boost of confidence. I needed the comfort of knowing I was being productive and providing for my family. But I could not get past all the trash talk I had read online about how terrible it was to work for those guys.

I had tried to choose my first company so carefully. I did that because of all the fear inducing trash talk I had exposed myself to about trucking companies. Here I was thinking I was making some great choices, yet I had never considered the fact that they have to reciprocate. They have to choose me. Getting a job is not a one way decision. Just because I think Brand X is a great place to work does not mean they are going to hire me.

Western Express did something that none of the other companies I looked into were willing to do. They chose me. They actually hired me! Here I was a total greenhorn with no knowledge or ability, and they took a big chance on me. They gave me a shot at proving I could handle the rigors of a job that a lot of people fail at. That is the best company to start your trucking career at. If someone reaches out to you to give you a chance, you take it and be thankful for it. Show your gratitude by busting your tail while being safe, productive, and easy to work with.

It turned out that all my fears were misguided foolishness. The internet had fooled me. The key to making my first trucking job successful had nothing to do with the name on the truck. I ended up with my first successful trucking endeavor while working at a company that was despised on the internet. I have never looked back and I have had a lot of success since those early first days. You will too if you focus on being safe, productive, and easy to work with. Carry on brother - you've got a bright future ahead of you. Make it happen!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mackerel (Mike D.)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanx Old School. I will keep my head up and my eyes on the prize.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Mackerel, I know exactly how you feel. I got rejected multiple times when I was trying to get started. I'm not sure if you are familiar with my start, but I'll share it with you...

I labored hard over that decision of where I wanted to start my trucking career. I look back now and laugh at how I came up with the reasons I chose my first trucking company. They were shallow and ill-informed. I was a victim of the negative influences of those stupid trucking company reviews.

I had made up my mind to pull flatbed freight. My top choice for the company I wanted to work for was TMC. They are a fine company, and I mean no slight against them by telling you my experience with them. I chose them because of the beautiful Peterbilt trucks they have. Who wouldn’t want to drive one of those wonderful black trucks with all that shiny chrome? I also chose them because they insisted that you keep your truck nice and clean. They even had a charge account at the Blue Beacon truck wash company so that you could go get your truck washed each week. I liked that idea of always being seen in a nice clean truck! As you can see I was more concerned with image than I was with productivity. I thought I would look really cool in one of those nice shiny black trucks!

It’s almost as embarrassing to admit how shallow my preferences were, as it is to admit they rejected me. I got sent home from TMC orientation twice! That’s right - twice! Two different times they invited me up there to Des Moines, Iowa and I got sent home both times. Then on my third attempt at landing my first trucking job I got sent home from the orientation I attended at PGT. They were my third try at landing a flatbed trucking job, and I failed again! So, here’s another thing to think about when considering this question of what is the best place to start a trucking career. We said it earlier. The best place to start is the place who will hire you and give you a shot at this rewarding career. If there is someone out there who is willing to let you prove you can handle this job, then get in there and show them what you are made of. That’s how it works in this industry. Somebody gives you a chance, and you strap yourself onto the bull and ride it out. You don’t act arrogantly as though you are above this “starter company.” You show some gratitude and some fortitude and you get in there and make something happen.

Guess where I landed after those first three times of getting thrown off the bull? I made a call to Western Express and they agreed to bring me in for orientation for a flatbed driving job. Of all the companies out there who had terrible reviews on the internet, they had to be the worst case scenario. I was scared. I was literally getting sick to my stomach at times. I didn’t know what else to do. I had been thoroughly rejected at those other places, and I needed a job badly. I also needed a boost of confidence. I needed the comfort of knowing I was being productive and providing for my family. But I could not get past all the trash talk I had read online about how terrible it was to work for those guys.

I had tried to choose my first company so carefully. I did that because of all the fear inducing trash talk I had exposed myself to about trucking companies. Here I was thinking I was making some great choices, yet I had never considered the fact that they have to reciprocate. They have to choose me. Getting a job is not a one way decision. Just because I think Brand X is a great place to work does not mean they are going to hire me.

Western Express did something that none of the other companies I looked into were willing to do. They chose me. They actually hired me! Here I was a total greenhorn with no knowledge or ability, and they took a big chance on me. They gave me a shot at proving I could handle the rigors of a job that a lot of people fail at. That is the best company to start your trucking career at. If someone reaches out to you to give you a chance, you take it and be thankful for it. Show your gratitude by busting your tail while being safe, productive, and easy to work with.

It turned out that all my fears were misguided foolishness. The internet had fooled me. The key to making my first trucking job successful had nothing to do with the name on the truck. I ended up with my first successful trucking endeavor while working at a company that was despised on the internet. I have never looked back and I have had a lot of success since those early first days. You will too if you focus on being safe, productive, and easy to work with. Carry on brother - you've got a bright future ahead of you. Make it happen!

Man I love me some Old School wisdom!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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