Questions About Working In The Mid-west.

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Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

How do yall know these posters by name? Dear God! LOL 😆 Do you keep a running track of IP addresses or something?

I found YOU, didn't I Moses?!?!? ""wink wink""

PR/intel is my side job, haha!! It's really not that hard. Good ole' Mark Z. did the groundwork!!

And yes, I DO have a running list... no joke! :) I know many people's real id's, and NO collusion with Brett, whatsoever; nor any mods on this site. I'm an independent, haha!

~ Anne ~

ps: No, Todd...you're not such a bad guy. I always reply to you. Just wish you'd quit changing names. Better than Purple Preston, I guess. I kinda 'liked' Tom Cougar, however. You're still him on TTR, right ?!?!? ;)

AlongCameJones's Comment
member avatar

Todd, changing names? Are there spy bots at this site? I just asked about trucking and the motor freight industry while living and working in South Dakota, ladies and gentlemen. Just simple, innocent, old-fashioned and honest talk. It's not "protocol".

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Come now, people, I'm not such a bad person.

You 'kind of' admitted your ID right here, Mr. Holmes. Wherefore, I agreed with you.

No bots, just savvy truckers (and their wives!)

There IS no 'protocol' but for the desire to learn this industry, as Trucking Truth was created for.

Did you ever read these wonderful resources, that Brett and many others (Old School included, and Rainy, as well? MANY of the members have had a part in creating the BEST educational trucking site on the internet.

Wish you well, as have I with EACH and every ID, good sir.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rhino's Comment
member avatar

Hahahaha

Todd, changing names? Are there spy bots at this site? I just asked about trucking and the motor freight industry while living and working in South Dakota, ladies and gentlemen. Just simple, innocent, old-fashioned and honest talk. It's not "protocol".

AlongCameJones's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Come now, people, I'm not such a bad person.

double-quotes-end.png

You 'kind of' admitted your ID right here, Mr. Holmes. Wherefore, I agreed with you.

No bots, just savvy truckers (and their wives!)

There IS no 'protocol' but for the desire to learn this industry, as Trucking Truth was created for.

Did you ever read these wonderful resources, that Brett and many others (Old School included, and Rainy, as well? MANY of the members have had a part in creating the BEST educational trucking site on the internet.

Wish you well, as have I with EACH and every ID, good sir.

~ Anne ~

Thank you Anne, from whomever you believe I am. I'm sure this line of work has attractive pay. It's a matter of finding the right part of America to live and work in that provides a nice work/life balance. Too much of any one thing is never a good thing. It's not just how much the job pays either. I would rather live in an outdoor paradise making $62K a year than in a desert or an icy tundra making $100K a year. I also have to find a part of America with enough employment opportunity for what I want to do. I hate to live in big concrete jungles.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Come now, people, I'm not such a bad person.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You 'kind of' admitted your ID right here, Mr. Holmes. Wherefore, I agreed with you.

No bots, just savvy truckers (and their wives!)

There IS no 'protocol' but for the desire to learn this industry, as Trucking Truth was created for.

Did you ever read these wonderful resources, that Brett and many others (Old School included, and Rainy, as well? MANY of the members have had a part in creating the BEST educational trucking site on the internet.

Wish you well, as have I with EACH and every ID, good sir.

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-end.png

Thank you Anne, from whomever you believe I am. I'm sure this line of work has attractive pay. It's a matter of finding the right part of America to live and work in that provides a nice work/life balance. Too much of any one thing is never a good thing. It's not just how much the job pays either. I would rather live in an outdoor paradise making $62K a year than in a desert or an icy tundra making $100K a year. I also have to find a part of America with enough employment opportunity for what I want to do. I hate to live in big concrete jungles.

Concrete jungles!! NOPE!

Agreed. We live in and around Amish country here in Ohio, and really actually love it. My guy's job is around $70K, home daily off weekends (but can always work one here & there by choice or chance.) Brett's seen a stub or two. Could be more OTR/LTL, could be less; we're good!

He has fam/people in SD working for Penske, driving and non. Having a CDL in the 'logistics' side of the profession is a HUGE PLUS. Even if you got a job as a hostler (Look up J Reding on YT and the otherworlds) .. he's a good friend of ours, got out of OTR and is 'yard doggin' and lovin' it, for Wilson.

I believe you are a 'thirsty/hunger driven' guy getting out of the military, that for whatever reason or another, feels more comfy asking similar questions, with new identities. I've never been military; my late dad & Bro were E7 and 5 respectively. USN. Can't quite figure 'that' part out, but, it doesn't matter.

I hear you on the 'desires' of the perfect climate/world; I do. We are just SO seated 'rooted' here in Ohio; don't see that changing. This family land we are on, goes back a few centuries; and I DO kinda like it here, way better than NY and FL (my 2 home states!)

Is Oklahoma that bad ?!?! Don't know anyone from the vicinity, tbh.

While we may never 'know' your real name; Todd is the first of our recollection...ergo, the 'Todd' reference. It's all good... IMHO anyway! One day, why don'tcha post & remind us of the ones you slipped by us, too??? I'm just a 'home worker' since Covid Spamdemic, and .. have a propensity for computer related things, until 'I' can spread my wings & go FULL MONTY CDLA in January, when our youngest turns 18. It's abandonment in Ohio, if I don't; or I leave before he graduates, also. (Dumb laws!)

Hope you are finding what you seek... I'll always answer to the best of my abilities. I don't have 'troll spray' in my cache, then again, not a driver (yet.) Did 2 tours on a CDLP myself, tho!!

~ Anne ~

(& Tom, when he's home!)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

An hour from Summit, SD, hour and a half from Fargo and a nice quiet rural town is the life for me.

Bush Country's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Texas is full of hurricanes, horny toads and alligators

double-quotes-end.png

confused.gif I never realized our natural resources were keeping so many ideal citizens away from our territory. It is nice to know we have such a wall of defense that discourages intruders!

Maybe we can start an advertising campaign on the left coast and keep some of those folks out?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
AlongCameJones's Comment
member avatar

Those northern states just look so pretty in the mid-West. Oklahoma is very flat and dusty. Hot, humid miserable muggy weather. Roads in Sooner State cities are in very bad shape. Those stupid pesky toll roads, turnpikes. Not a lot of mountains, mountain rivers and clear bodies of water. Oklahoma is also plagued by much dust, tornadoes, flash floods and erosion. Crime in Sooner is bit on the high side. I like rolling hills, green grass, clean cool bodies of water, no pollution, no noise, no drama, fresh cooler air, lush forests and canyons. The SOONER I get out here the better I might feel. Idaho is pretty, I've lived there but rent and houses have gotten too high-priced in Boise area. Montana and Wyoming tend to be on the high side too now. I kind of like the idea of a permit-less-concealed-carry state too. Ohio might have more job opportunities than South Dakota because of its population density but I've heard that Cleveland is a dump. Some parts of Pocatello, ID might not be too bad in housing costs. Pocatello is a sizable city.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Those northern states just look so pretty in the mid-West. Oklahoma is very flat and dusty. Hot, humid miserable muggy weather. Roads in Sooner State cities are in very bad shape. Those stupid pesky toll roads, turnpikes. Not a lot of mountains, mountain rivers and clear bodies of water. Oklahoma is also plagued by much dust, tornadoes, flash floods and erosion. Crime in Sooner is bit on the high side. I like rolling hills, green grass, clean cool bodies of water, no pollution, no noise, no drama, fresh cooler air, lush forests and canyons. The SOONER I get out here the better I might feel. Idaho is pretty, I've lived there but rent and houses have gotten too high-priced in Boise area. Montana and Wyoming tend to be on the high side too now. I kind of like the idea of a permit-less-concealed-carry state too. Ohio might have more job opportunities than South Dakota because of its population density but I've heard that Cleveland is a dump. Some parts of Pocatello, ID might not be too bad in housing costs. Pocatello is a sizable city.

Cleveland IS a dump.

If looking into Ohio, think more the 'center' state area; ie: Mansfield ... or even MORE southern.

Want a bigger city/area? Look into Toledo (ports, Michigan across the bridge!) for MANY driving and non opportunities.

Where'd you go, Todd Mr. Jones???? Is there a Missus? I sure DO love that song..... lol.

My hubby just got home a few ago; wrapping it up, post tripping the rig (here, at home.) Kinda miss your inquisitive banter, personally!

Again, Penske is HUGE in SD !!

On other sites, I know people tell you 'VEGAS, baby!' .. re: taxes or the lack of. That's a thought, also.

Hope all is well,

~ Anne ~

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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