Thoughts On Making A Company Change?

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CM59's Comment
member avatar

Hello, I posted last year about getting into trucking. I meant to follow up on the experience by now, but 9 months in now a lot is still evolving.

I wanted to ask you’re opinion on this potential move. I very greatly wanted to wait until the first year but I have been running into many issues the past few months.

I work on a dedicated southeast regional , home Sat/Sun, sometimes Friday as well. The company has been fantastic. Friendly staff, great to work with, running a 2022 Cascadia. But, at the end of the day the miles count more. At first, I was averaging 9000 miles a month @44.5+4 monthly safety which is good for me. As time and more drivers are joining the route, I have had months with 8500, 8000, and now 7000 last month.

I can say that this is coming down to very short trips, (200-400) with dropoff the next day. Preload delays and also the nondedicated loads mixed in that has me at DCs for half the day.

I have two small children so I was looking into some local jobs out of Jax, FL. I reached out to about 10 companies, most offering about the same estimate of 55k a year. Will hear from more tomorrow after the holiday. Whether or not they’ll hire me up for debate with experience, but many didn’t require one year.

JB Hunt has reached out willing to hire about their intermodal home daily, 2 days off. The yard is close to my house and the shift is overnight 6PM-4/6AM Fri and Sat off. Seems like a great schedule. No traffic, hopefully mostly drop and hook.

I’ve been researching and people seem to take home of around 800-950+ towards my region. Amount is definitely up for debate, but also able to work a 6th day. The estimate from the company is 1050 gross. Honestly even the lower range is workable, with 900 being the sweet spot. Lately I’ve been taking home less than all of that.

I don’t mind the work, I enjoy quick drop offs and turnaround but I still feel comfortable with what I’m doing now in this phase of being a new driver. I may be home only 1.5-2 days but I’m not tired when I am.

Any thoughts are much appreciated. Thanks

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hello, I posted last year about getting into trucking. I meant to follow up on the experience by now, but 9 months in now a lot is still evolving.

I wanted to ask you’re opinion on this potential move. I very greatly wanted to wait until the first year but I have been running into many issues the past few months.

I work on a dedicated southeast regional , home Sat/Sun, sometimes Friday as well. The company has been fantastic. Friendly staff, great to work with, running a 2022 Cascadia. But, at the end of the day the miles count more. At first, I was averaging 9000 miles a month @44.5+4 monthly safety which is good for me. As time and more drivers are joining the route, I have had months with 8500, 8000, and now 7000 last month.

I can say that this is coming down to very short trips, (200-400) with dropoff the next day. Preload delays and also the nondedicated loads mixed in that has me at DCs for half the day.

I have two small children so I was looking into some local jobs out of Jax, FL. I reached out to about 10 companies, most offering about the same estimate of 55k a year. Will hear from more tomorrow after the holiday. Whether or not they’ll hire me up for debate with experience, but many didn’t require one year.

JB Hunt has reached out willing to hire about their intermodal home daily, 2 days off. The yard is close to my house and the shift is overnight 6PM-4/6AM Fri and Sat off. Seems like a great schedule. No traffic, hopefully mostly drop and hook.

I’ve been researching and people seem to take home of around 800-950+ towards my region. Amount is definitely up for debate, but also able to work a 6th day. The estimate from the company is 1050 gross. Honestly even the lower range is workable, with 900 being the sweet spot. Lately I’ve been taking home less than all of that.

I don’t mind the work, I enjoy quick drop offs and turnaround but I still feel comfortable with what I’m doing now in this phase of being a new driver. I may be home only 1.5-2 days but I’m not tired when I am.

Any thoughts are much appreciated. Thanks

Haya, Cody!

Not sure who you 'are' working for; then again, don't recall if you ever mentioned it, either!

Anyway, a great company right up in 'your' area is: Cypress Truck Lines.

Nothing bad with JB Hunt, either, but I grew up in Florida, and know a few 'kinfolk' that have worked for Cypress. Personally, just not fond of ports; I used to haul reconditioned boat propellers into Canaveral, myself....fun fun! Ha.

Wish you the best!

~ Anne ~

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

CM59's Comment
member avatar

Haha, no I didn’t. Honestly, the more I think about the decision to move the less I like it. My company has been great and a blessing that I landed how I did. I think I’m letting the financial nerves hit me. This downswing won’t last forever and my family life is great as it is right now.

I work for May Trucking. I’m with Moe on that one. I need to be active on here. Several people gave me some great advice when I started out. Maybe I could give a review of the southeast side of May.

Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

I was on board with you going with JB until I read your last thoughts on it. Have you reached out to your employer and voiced your concerns. They might be willing to work with you. Otherwise, it sounds like the JB gig is what you were looking for. Mm, I don't think you should concern youself to much with only having 9 months in, just don't make a habit of it and have a good reason for doing it. On a side note, don't get burned out on the nightly routine. Make sure you are willing to run nights. You tend to run in to problems like, everyone else, family and friends, being up during the day and you never get to see them or spend time with them. Anyway, hopefully this is helpful.

Good luck!

Hello, I posted last year about getting into trucking. I meant to follow up on the experience by now, but 9 months in now a lot is still evolving.

I wanted to ask you’re opinion on this potential move. I very greatly wanted to wait until the first year but I have been running into many issues the past few months.

I work on a dedicated southeast regional , home Sat/Sun, sometimes Friday as well. The company has been fantastic. Friendly staff, great to work with, running a 2022 Cascadia. But, at the end of the day the miles count more. At first, I was averaging 9000 miles a month @44.5+4 monthly safety which is good for me. As time and more drivers are joining the route, I have had months with 8500, 8000, and now 7000 last month.

I can say that this is coming down to very short trips, (200-400) with dropoff the next day. Preload delays and also the nondedicated loads mixed in that has me at DCs for half the day.

I have two small children so I was looking into some local jobs out of Jax, FL. I reached out to about 10 companies, most offering about the same estimate of 55k a year. Will hear from more tomorrow after the holiday. Whether or not they’ll hire me up for debate with experience, but many didn’t require one year.

JB Hunt has reached out willing to hire about their intermodal home daily, 2 days off. The yard is close to my house and the shift is overnight 6PM-4/6AM Fri and Sat off. Seems like a great schedule. No traffic, hopefully mostly drop and hook.

I’ve been researching and people seem to take home of around 800-950+ towards my region. Amount is definitely up for debate, but also able to work a 6th day. The estimate from the company is 1050 gross. Honestly even the lower range is workable, with 900 being the sweet spot. Lately I’ve been taking home less than all of that.

I don’t mind the work, I enjoy quick drop offs and turnaround but I still feel comfortable with what I’m doing now in this phase of being a new driver. I may be home only 1.5-2 days but I’m not tired when I am.

Any thoughts are much appreciated. Thanks

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Talk to your dispatcher. They cant fix what isnt broken and always want to make the good safe drivers happy.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m interested in hearing the positives of May’s Southeast Regional. I thought they were only doing refrigerated. And I live <1/2 mile from the Pensacola location.

Thanks.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CM59's Comment
member avatar

All the dispatchers are in that small building and they’re all great. Ate lunch with the lead in their office when I was training. They give you ownership and responsibility, work as your teammate not your boss. They’re very flexible about home time. New trucks.

Pay isn’t the best. From what I’ve seen it’s geared towards new drivers out of school but they really enjoy keeping ones around. If I don’t bother my DM she don’t bother me.

I wrote up a detailed post for the route but not sure about TMI’ing that info out.

I’m interested in hearing the positives of May’s Southeast Regional. I thought they were only doing refrigerated. And I live <1/2 mile from the Pensacola location.

Thanks.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

All the dispatchers are in that small building and they’re all great. Ate lunch with the lead in their office when I was training. They give you ownership and responsibility, work as your teammate not your boss. They’re very flexible about home time. New trucks.

Pay isn’t the best. From what I’ve seen it’s geared towards new drivers out of school but they really enjoy keeping ones around. If I don’t bother my DM she don’t bother me.

I wrote up a detailed post for the route but not sure about TMI’ing that info out.

double-quotes-start.png

I’m interested in hearing the positives of May’s Southeast Regional. I thought they were only doing refrigerated. And I live <1/2 mile from the Pensacola location.

Thanks.

double-quotes-end.png

My email address is in my bio if you want to send it. I have no desire to disclose that information to anyone. Just would like general info. If you’re not comfortable sending it, I understand.

Thanks

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
CM59's Comment
member avatar

I ended up posting it on the front page since it’s hard to find much info about them in general.

On a side note, JB is still reaching out about their semi-local target account but it had already closed when I reached back out. Recruiter is throwing out 2700 miles @ 0.57. If that’s to be believed that’s a good opportunity as long as it fits with family time. Jury is not in on that yet though.

double-quotes-start.png

All the dispatchers are in that small building and they’re all great. Ate lunch with the lead in their office when I was training. They give you ownership and responsibility, work as your teammate not your boss. They’re very flexible about home time. New trucks.

Pay isn’t the best. From what I’ve seen it’s geared towards new drivers out of school but they really enjoy keeping ones around. If I don’t bother my DM she don’t bother me.

I wrote up a detailed post for the route but not sure about TMI’ing that info out.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I’m interested in hearing the positives of May’s Southeast Regional. I thought they were only doing refrigerated. And I live <1/2 mile from the Pensacola location.

Thanks.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

My email address is in my bio if you want to send it. I have no desire to disclose that information to anyone. Just would like general info. If you’re not comfortable sending it, I understand.

Thanks

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

If you’re still considering a move, check out Robert Bearden Inc (RBITrucking.com).

Also southeast regional. Requires 1 year experience. I’ve considered others, but it’s been good for me for almost 6years. I think we hire out of Jacksonville. I live in Pensacola.

I hope this helps.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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