Grey Area Of Is It Safe To Run Or Not?

Topic 30913 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

My DM told me he has a load for me going to Glenwood Springs CO, just from our yard in Aurora CO, They havent dispatched me yet on it. I told him Id keep an eye on the weather and road conditions over the pass and let him know. He said, likewise, he would keep an eye for the trailer getting in into the yard as it was coming from Cheyenne.

Ive driven 70 in the mountains a lot, in very unroadworthy vehicles, but never in a big truck yet. I taught skiing at winter park, and lived up in Frasier CO, so not a stranger to the road conditions and weather up there. I checked the road conditions and weather, road cameras up there all morning. Its borderline. Mostly wet, some snow and ice in places. Ive seen much worse, and see a lot of trucks running there. Not withstanding, I messaged my DM that I have some concerns about road conditions in a few areas and sent him screenshots of the CDOT road cameras. I also noted a long line of trucks at the chain up area, pulled off. Part of my concerns is the temp will only reach 33 today, leaving a wet roadway to refreeze in the evening and night.

I understand that Im the captain of my ship, and if I dont feel safe, dont run. But it feels borderline, and I feel like Im being a slacker by not calling and telling him I want to run that load. Is that normal to feel like that? This is the first time that Ive felt it may be questionable to run. Im having a hard time shaking my mindset from years of working construction: You get your a$$ to work no matter what the weather is.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I was just through there 3 days ago. The road itself is in decent shape, but it's down to one lane for several miles at 30 mph. Just take your time.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Do you think developing your own rule of thumb might help you make a decision more easily? For example, you could make a decision to NOT drive whenever DOT closes the road to vehicles without snow tires or chains. That gives you a solid reason to base a decision upon. It helps to take some of the guesswork out of it. That's how I did it. That's also what my FM at Prime advised: "If chains are required, just shut it down."

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Ah yes the age old question, especially when you are new. I think playing it safe and surviving your first winter is important as you gain experience you'll easily be able to identify when it is safe or when it isn't.

My first winter I had a close call with black ice and it still worries me to this day, however coming into my 4th winter I am now more able to recognize the subtle signs and determine if I should run or not. I will say last year I ran in conditions that would have kept me off the road my first year.

Remember " I'd rather be at home wishing i was on the road, rather than being on the road(or ditch) wishing I was at home"

PJ's Comment
member avatar

At your experience level DO NOT push it. My general rule of thumb is 2 fold. IF chains are required I’m parking it. IF I can’t safely maintain 45 mph I’m parking it.

Too me no load is worth risking anyone’s life and less than 45 your wasting your time. Road crews are pretty good getting roads in good shape not too long after a storm passes.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Road crews are pretty good getting roads in good shape not too long after a storm passes.

You weren't in Wyoming on 80 yesterday, were you?

wtf-2.gif

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Interesting about below 45. I never thought about that. Good rule of thumb. We don't run if chains are required. At least generally. It's my first winter driving and I do keep with my mindset of building a career slowly and safely right from the start.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Senior Chief I haven’t been to wy in 2.5 years and don’t plan on returning. Most snow I get is up through the middle midwest and occassional NE. The more I stay south of I40 the better I like it.

David S.'s Comment
member avatar

My DM told me he has a load for me going to Glenwood Springs CO, just from our yard in Aurora CO, They havent dispatched me yet on it. I told him Id keep an eye on the weather and road conditions over the pass and let him know. He said, likewise, he would keep an eye for the trailer getting in into the yard as it was coming from Cheyenne.

Ive driven 70 in the mountains a lot, in very unroadworthy vehicles, but never in a big truck yet. I taught skiing at winter park, and lived up in Frasier CO, so not a stranger to the road conditions and weather up there. I checked the road conditions and weather, road cameras up there all morning. Its borderline. Mostly wet, some snow and ice in places. Ive seen much worse, and see a lot of trucks running there. Not withstanding, I messaged my DM that I have some concerns about road conditions in a few areas and sent him screenshots of the CDOT road cameras. I also noted a long line of trucks at the chain up area, pulled off. Part of my concerns is the temp will only reach 33 today, leaving a wet roadway to refreeze in the evening and night.

I understand that Im the captain of my ship, and if I dont feel safe, dont run. But it feels borderline, and I feel like Im being a slacker by not calling and telling him I want to run that load. Is that normal to feel like that? This is the first time that Ive felt it may be questionable to run. Im having a hard time shaking my mindset from years of working construction: You get your a$$ to work no matter what the weather is.

If you're not comfortable then don't pull it. I took an entire week off from winter weather last winter because I'm not driving in that! Good company will understand.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

My DM totally appreciated the position I took. We talked about it. They definitely don't want us running when we're not comfortable. And they really do seem to care about safety first.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More