How Do I Best Use The Automatic On Hills In Winter Conditions?

Topic 30999 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

Ok, I am a smidge concerned about slippery driving conditions in a semi, with an automatic. Obviously I figured out the hill decent feature for summer time driving conditions. How do I safely "slow my roll" going downhill without roasting my brakes?

I grew up in Montana and learned snow/ice driving along the way. How do I transition that knowledge into the truck?

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I would say yes. Just start down the hills really slow, using the Jake as needed, but not in snow or slush.

You can try using the cruise control, set about five mph less than your desired speed because it will creep up. It all depends how steep the grade going down, and the weight in the box.

I apply the brakes whenever it starts climbing in speed, bring it down to five mph under my desired speed, then let off the brakes. Try to keep the RPMs under two grand. If you're moving up or down the hills below 45 mph put those flashers on, unless all the traffic is creeping (like construction zones or rush hour).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

One other thing is if you're not sure if you did use too much braking coming down a grade. In a safe place, pull off afterwards and have a look, smell, and feel of your brakes at each position-truck AND trailer.

If these are getting cooked, you will see smoke coming off them; smell the noxious fumes of hot brakes; feel the heat coming off them with the back of your hand.

You're going to smell the brakes of a hot rod driver zipping down the mountain too fast from miles away.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

I get the theory of stab braking, so I'm guessing snow/ice/slush is just the same thing, only much slower? I thought cruise and Jake were no-no with any moisture on the roadway.

I would say yes. Just start down the hills really slow, using the Jake as needed, but not in snow or slush.

You can try using the cruise control, set about five mph less than your desired speed because it will creep up. It all depends how steep the grade going down, and the weight in the box.

I apply the brakes whenever it starts climbing in speed, bring it down to five mph under my desired speed, then let off the brakes. Try to keep the RPMs under two grand. If you're moving up or down the hills below 45 mph put those flashers on, unless all the traffic is creeping (like construction zones or rush hour).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Cruise and Jakes are definitely a No-No in slush, snow, or rain. Packrat mentioned to use them "but not in snow or slush."

The way he described is the way you go about it. Determine your safe speed, which is whatever speed you feel comfortable going down that hill. Brake until you are 5 mph below that safe speed, then release the brakes. Allow yourself to roll back up to that safe speed before braking to 5 mph below it again. Rinse repeat until you reach the bottom of the hill.

By the way, that's called "controlled braking", not stab braking. The stab method is only used in emergencies.

Chris P.'s Comment
member avatar

Turtle,

Isn't stab braking only useful when you don't have antilock brakes?

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Turtle,

Isn't stab braking only useful when you don't have antilock brakes?

Technically, yes. ABS systems have largely taken away the need for the stab method. However, it is still a method to be used in the event of an emergency, such as when/if the ABS fails or when/if you go into a skid.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

ABS has been mandated for about 40 years now.

NightOwl's Comment
member avatar

What is the difference between controlled braking and stab braking?

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

What is the difference between controlled braking and stab braking?

That’s a good question. I thought stab breaking was when you determined a certain speed, say 40mph as an example. When you reach 40, you apply the service breaks until you slow down to 35. Then release the break until you hit 40 again. As Turtle put it, rinse and repeat. Is “controlled breaking” different? Just looking for a little more clarity on this question.

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Dealing With The Weather First Solo Months On The Road Safe Driving Tips Tips For Braking
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More