How Do I Best Use The Automatic On Hills In Winter Conditions?

Topic 30999 | Page 2

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Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Just a different angle on this issue.

I’ve driven one full winter and most of it was in the north and northeast. And it was a harsh winter. Being a mostly life long Wisconsin boy, I’m used to winter driving conditions and in 53 years of winter driving I’ve never had an accident. Why? Because my dad taught me to use EXTREME caution because if I didn’t, he would take my license away. I feared my dad and knew my license was at stake.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

So, just to make a long story endless, I have always thought the secret to safe, successful, accident free winter (bad weather) driving is to SLOW down to a completely safe speed and to get the heck off the road if you don’t feel safe. And, very importantly, NEVER think about getting miles in for your paycheck. Better to go 200 miles safely than take chances to get 500. If you are going so slow that you are impeding traffic, get off the road and park. When your company asks why you are late for a delivery, your simple explanation is: “Weather related”. It’s just that simple, in my opinion

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
What is the difference between controlled braking and stab braking?

Controlled braking is as we described. Stab braking is when you apply brakes hard enough to lock them up before quickly releasing, then immediately applying the brakes again. This process is quickly repeated over and over.

ABS systems do the stab braking for you. When you hit the brakes hard in an emergency situation, the ABS senses when the wheels lock up, and release just long enough to maintain traction before applying hard brakes again.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

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What is the difference between controlled braking and stab braking?

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That’s a good question. I thought stab breaking was when you determined a certain speed, say 40mph as an example. When you reach 40, you apply the service breaks until you slow down to 35. Then release the break until you hit 40 again. As Turtle put it, rinse and repeat. Is “controlled breaking” different? Just looking for a little more clarity on this question.

Stab braking is like a more rapid brake and release action (about a half second between) that is used on non-ABS brakes. It's a technique that is used to prevent brakes locking up. The reason stab braking is not needed with an ABS system is that if ABS brakes start to lock up, the system actually mimics stab braking for the operator.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

What is the difference between controlled braking and stab braking?

double-quotes-end.png

Controlled braking is as we described. Stab braking is when you apply brakes hard enough to lock them up before quickly releasing, then immediately applying the brakes again. This process is quickly repeated over and over.

ABS systems do the stab braking for you. When you hit the brakes hard in an emergency situation, the ABS senses when the wheels lock up, and release just long enough to maintain traction before applying hard brakes again.

I think Turtle here explained it a bit better than I.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

If it's a light rain, and the roads aren't super wet, like no freestanding water, is it still ok to use some Jake?

Also if I leave the Jake only on the most mild setting, it allows me to hold a gear. I can do that by putting it in manual mode, but the loaner truck I have, manual mode only works to 35 mph.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

We can explain the basics, but hill decent and ascent will take experience. Methods that are great in PA can differ widely than a technique utilized in NM. Try different techniques until you arrive at what works best for you.

Obviously, the biggest goal is to reach the bottom safely, slowly, and under complete control.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

That's what I thought stab braking was, but thinking back, isn't it brake till they almost lock up, release, rinse and repeat?

double-quotes-start.png

What is the difference between controlled braking and stab braking?

double-quotes-end.png

That’s a good question. I thought stab breaking was when you determined a certain speed, say 40mph as an example. When you reach 40, you apply the service breaks until you slow down to 35. Then release the break until you hit 40 again. As Turtle put it, rinse and repeat. Is “controlled breaking” different? Just looking for a little more clarity on this question.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

Oops. I replied before reading to the end.

Thank you gentlemen, I figured that was "best practices" but wanted to confirm from people doing it a heck of a lot longer than I have!

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

That's what I thought stab braking was, but thinking back, isn't it brake till they almost lock up, release, rinse and repeat?

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

What is the difference between controlled braking and stab braking?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

That’s a good question. I thought stab breaking was when you determined a certain speed, say 40mph as an example. When you reach 40, you apply the service breaks until you slow down to 35. Then release the break until you hit 40 again. As Turtle put it, rinse and repeat. Is “controlled breaking” different? Just looking for a little more clarity on this question.

double-quotes-end.png

Yes. That is why modern vehicles didn't require using that method. ABS does that for the vehicle operator just before brakes lock up to prevent them locking up.

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