Best Engine For A Kenworth

Topic 31010 | Page 1

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Carlyne G.'s Comment
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Hi everyone! Newbie here..figured this would be as good as place as any to ask this question. I'm looking at a 2011 Kenworth T800 with a C13 Caterpillar engine in it. It's got a 10 speed Eaton Fuller, 430 hp, 661,151 miles on it, 3.70 rear end. I've received several opinions on that engine. What are your thoughts on it? Thanks!

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Obviously you are intending to become an owner operator or already are one. Why do you want to ruin your life?

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Stevo Reno's Comment
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CAT engines are probably the MOST expensive 1's to rebuild/replace, when the time comes.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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The C13 is a good engine, just don’t expect to do much in the way of added performance. They’re expensive to rebuild although not as expensive as the 3406 or C15. The 3.70 rears will help it on the hills but beat you up on the fuel economy. I’m honestly surprised to see a C13 in a glider.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I'm surprised, too, but mainly about the super-low mileage for a 10 year old motor. Those rear end ratios would have me crossing this one off the list, though.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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It would depend on where you’re going to run. If I lived in eastern Ohio and was going to stay in that area, PA, WV, MD, it would be great. For the flats though, too tall.

Carlyne G.'s Comment
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Going to be running Kansas. So obviously lots of different terrain here. Pulling mainly grain hopper, with maybe some flatbed but that's too be determined yet.

It's one that was close to us. The husband is a mechanic and knows how to work on caterpillar engine over Cummins. His opinion is anything under a T600 is crap. He said at there work they had one that the foreman was trying to convince the driver to get a C13 in it. But from the looks of the replies, it's one to probably steer clear of. We are looking at it for a starter truck to get us going at least.

Art M.'s Comment
member avatar

As far as me is guessing, there is no such thing as "best" engine. It depends on what you are looking for. Power, economy, longevity, etc. If that engine suits your needs, keep it, why not?

Minnis B.'s Comment
member avatar

I’ve driven just about every engine there is, from the old 3406B Cat engine and 400 “Big Cam” Cummins all the way up to the C15 Cat and X15 Cummins along with several Detroit and Paccar engines. A C13 is a decent engine, pretty reliable but as others have said they can be expensive to overhaul. In my opinion there is a rule of thumb, Detroit’s generally provide the best fuel economy but have less power than the others and the engine brake isn’t much more than just a noise maker. Cummins generally has the worst fuel economy but the most power and the engine brake will put you through the windshield if you aren’t careful. Cat engines and paccar engines are generally a happy medium, decent fuel economy, decent power, and a decent engine brake. Of course every rule has an exception and in this case it’s the variables of the transmission and gear ratio. Running all highway you’d be just fine with a 10, 13, or 18 speed transmission. I’d recommend a 3.42 or higher gear ratio. If you’ll be doing much in the way of off road or heavy hauling (such as going in the field to load the grain trailers or being loaded over 100k gross) I’d recommend a 15 or 18 speed transmission with a 3.73 gear.

Personally I haul coal in WV. My average gross weight is 123,000-126,000 and 90% of the trucks in this niche are equipped with C15 or X15 engines and 18 speed transmissions with 52,000 lb rated rear ends and 4.10 gears. That is for the on road trucks. We have off road trucks that never leave mine property that can gross as much as 180,000 lbs and those are generally an X15 with a 15 speed trans, 60,000+ lb rated rear ends that are planetary drive with 5.13 or lower gears. You wanna talk about a mule, there’s not much those bad boys won’t pull but that’s way too much overkill for this application.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I’ve driven just about every engine there is, from the old 3406B Cat engine and 400 “Big Cam” Cummins all the way up to the C15 Cat and X15 Cummins along with several Detroit and Paccar engines. A C13 is a decent engine, pretty reliable but as others have said they can be expensive to overhaul. In my opinion there is a rule of thumb, Detroit’s generally provide the best fuel economy but have less power than the others and the engine brake isn’t much more than just a noise maker. Cummins generally has the worst fuel economy but the most power and the engine brake will put you through the windshield if you aren’t careful. Cat engines and paccar engines are generally a happy medium, decent fuel economy, decent power, and a decent engine brake. Of course every rule has an exception and in this case it’s the variables of the transmission and gear ratio. Running all highway you’d be just fine with a 10, 13, or 18 speed transmission. I’d recommend a 3.42 or higher gear ratio. If you’ll be doing much in the way of off road or heavy hauling (such as going in the field to load the grain trailers or being loaded over 100k gross) I’d recommend a 15 or 18 speed transmission with a 3.73 gear.

Personally I haul coal in WV. My average gross weight is 123,000-126,000 and 90% of the trucks in this niche are equipped with C15 or X15 engines and 18 speed transmissions with 52,000 lb rated rear ends and 4.10 gears. That is for the on road trucks. We have off road trucks that never leave mine property that can gross as much as 180,000 lbs and those are generally an X15 with a 15 speed trans, 60,000+ lb rated rear ends that are planetary drive with 5.13 or lower gears. You wanna talk about a mule, there’s not much those bad boys won’t pull but that’s way too much overkill for this application.

Always awesome to see ya stop in, Minnis !!!!

Don't be a stranger! Stay safe,

~ Anne ~

ps: Does the impeding 'winter' affect your work, in the coal industry? Sure did when we hauled asphalt. Just curious, thanks!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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