Taking Curves Too Slow?

Topic 31069 | Page 2

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Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

The point I was trying to make Bklyn Dreams is you don’t want to be slamming on the brakes still as your entering the curb. I’d say that’s a pretty solid rule of thumb to follow for a new driver.

Too many variables in determining one rule of thumb for every situation.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I completely agree with the advice to stay in your comfort zone and not worry about everyone else. That being said there is one thing no one else has mentioned that you might find helpful. I’ve had lots of driver training - CDL school, Emergency Vehicle Operators Certification, work related training, etc. One thing they all discuss is proper vehicle control in curves, specifically the process where you brake BEFORE entering the curve, then accelerate gently through the curve. Why? If you brake before the curve you reduce your speed and therefore momentum before trying to change direction, and basic physics says that things tend to want to go in a straight line, so to reduce that effect you reduce your momentum. That will let your truck “turn in” easier and feel less out of control.

Now the important part - accelerating through the curve. No, not like a race car! Gently, but with some authority. What this does is change the dynamic of your vehicle. If you’re coasting through a curve your load is pushing you - the load is in control, not you. By gently accelerating you are putting the tractor in control and forcing the load to follow rather than push. Try it a few times and I think you will find it helps. With practice you will find the right combination of entry speed and acceleration that lets you feel in control the whole way through.

Another thing to mention is to try to avoid braking after you enter the curve, known as trail braking. It can be done, but in a big truck with a hinge in the middle it can be a very scary situation because you are putting extremely high side loads on your tractors drive axle which will make it feel pretty unstable.

Gregg

^^THIS^^

Never exceed the speed you’re comfortable with, like everyone else said. And don’t base your speed on what everyone else is doing. Like my mom always said, “We’re not everyone else” lol.

But yeah as far as tips on how to manage curves better, brake before the curve, let up and then accelerate out of the curve is how it’s done. Something I find helpful regardless of speed to help me get better control in the curves is to turn the wheel a little just before I get to the curve. It kinda shifts the weight a little before entering the curve so it doesn’t happen after I’m already in the curve. It also helps me control the off tracking better too.

That said, there’s no rush. Even as you improve your cornering, you’re better off being the slower truck in the corners.

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Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Davy, if you notice most all curved ramps are slanted to the inside. This keeps your weight on the downside helping to prevent rollovers. You may just be mentally feeling like that. However, if you feel like 10 or 15 is too fast then do 5 or 10. Are you gonna catch crap on the radio? Absolutely but the time it takes to round the curve then straighten out is minimal compared to the time it takes to get a couple of wreckers out to clean up the mess and clear the road for traffic if you roll it. Again, its probably all in your head but better safe then sorry.

This has me wondering...

Would that be a good time to just turn off the CB? Going through orientation at TransAm, they told us the first couple dozen backs we would be hearing drivers chattering about us/to us on the CB. Trainers at TransAm advised to just turn it off or the volume down to keep from letting that rattle us. Would that be a good suggestion for going slow around a curve, on ramp, exit ramp, etc?

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I personally wouldn’t recommend trying to fumble with your cb while navigating a curve because of what another moron driver is saying. Tune it out. Different scenarios from when you’re in a truck stop.

double-quotes-start.png

Davy, if you notice most all curved ramps are slanted to the inside. This keeps your weight on the downside helping to prevent rollovers. You may just be mentally feeling like that. However, if you feel like 10 or 15 is too fast then do 5 or 10. Are you gonna catch crap on the radio? Absolutely but the time it takes to round the curve then straighten out is minimal compared to the time it takes to get a couple of wreckers out to clean up the mess and clear the road for traffic if you roll it. Again, its probably all in your head but better safe then sorry.

double-quotes-end.png

This has me wondering...

Would that be a good time to just turn off the CB? Going through orientation at TransAm, they told us the first couple dozen backs we would be hearing drivers chattering about us/to us on the CB. Trainers at TransAm advised to just turn it off or the volume down to keep from letting that rattle us. Would that be a good suggestion for going slow around a curve, on ramp, exit ramp, etc?

Bklyn Dreams's Comment
member avatar

The point I was trying to make Bklyn Dreams is you don’t want to be slamming on the brakes still as your entering the curb. I’d say that’s a pretty solid rule of thumb to follow for a new driver.

double-quotes-start.png

Too many variables in determining one rule of thumb for every situation.

double-quotes-end.png

I agree Bird-One. I stand corrected.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I highly recommend you stay off the CB entirely, Kerry. Listening is always good idea.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't respond on the cb, haven't got any flack on it yet. I roadraced motorcycles for 10 years, raced cars on oval and road. Pretty familiar with performance driving tactics. I use slow in/fast out. Breaking markers, turn in, apex and exit markers. There in lies one habit I'm trying to change. In motorcycle racing, I have a tendency to look to the outside of the turn during braking phase. It's habit from outside-inside-outside (the preferred race line through a turn). I've found myself looking too long at it. So I need to be looking through the turn further up and sooner. Still just gets on my nerves having the vehicle lean the opposite way that I like to lean.

Chris K.'s Comment
member avatar

Man I wish I had Stevens breakdown of operating the truck in curves, lane change, passing etc. It was spot on and easy to use while driving. Oh well

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

I personally wouldn’t recommend trying to fumble with your cb while navigating a curve because of what another moron driver is saying. Tune it out. Different scenarios from when you’re in a truck stop.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Davy, if you notice most all curved ramps are slanted to the inside. This keeps your weight on the downside helping to prevent rollovers. You may just be mentally feeling like that. However, if you feel like 10 or 15 is too fast then do 5 or 10. Are you gonna catch crap on the radio? Absolutely but the time it takes to round the curve then straighten out is minimal compared to the time it takes to get a couple of wreckers out to clean up the mess and clear the road for traffic if you roll it. Again, its probably all in your head but better safe then sorry.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

This has me wondering...

Would that be a good time to just turn off the CB? Going through orientation at TransAm, they told us the first couple dozen backs we would be hearing drivers chattering about us/to us on the CB. Trainers at TransAm advised to just turn it off or the volume down to keep from letting that rattle us. Would that be a good suggestion for going slow around a curve, on ramp, exit ramp, etc?

double-quotes-end.png

Good point.

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