3 Hrs Or 150 Mile Rule

Topic 31136 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Andrey's Comment
member avatar

I was taught at Roehl, and I also believe I read about it in CDL manual, that a driver must do safety checks every 3 hours or 150 miles whatever happens first. My trainer was not religious on that, but was aware of it, and we actually made these stops every 150-200 miles. I banged tires, checked lights, and used a bathroom. Now I see quite a few people write about driving 4+ hours straight, which makes it a violation, I guess. Is it something that is enforced or not? Do DOT officers look at these stops during inspection?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Are you doing flatbed ? If not, that regulation doesn’t apply. It’s there for open deck drivers so that they’ll get out, check the load securement and tarps if need be. Many will also include a quick walk around while at it since you’re on both sides of the truck anyway.

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Are you doing flatbed ? If not, that regulation doesn’t apply. It’s there for open deck drivers so that they’ll get out, check the load securement and tarps if need be. Many will also include a quick walk around while at it since you’re on both sides of the truck anyway.

That rule only applies to flatbed? I did not know that. I also saw in the manuel it says that and did orientation recently and they didn't mention it was only for flatbed.

I'm currently on the road training and my trainer has me running 5hrs straight with no break. I was going to mention that to him because I'm not use to driving that much and it's my first week. Also didn't want to be a pain in the butt so I just stuck with it.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Primarily for flatbed or open deck work. It can apply to van loads though if you’re only using a padlock on the doors and you hold the key. If the load is sealed then you wouldn’t be required to do the load check. It’s a bit of a strange regulation 392.9 but usually only ever applied to open deck haulers.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

0532518001637931555.jpg

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

I was taught 7 yrs ago that particular rule was for flatbed types. Have NEVER had a DOT inspection look at my logs and ask about why I wasn't annotating those inspections....not even when I got pulled in for two Level I and three Level III inspections in 3 weeks while working for one company that DOT later shut down. Those inspections were THOROUGH because the company was having us run illegal.

Laura

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

392.9.b.4 The rules of paragraph(b) do not apply to the driver of a sealed commercial motor vehicle who has been ordered not to open it to inspect it's cargo or to the driver of a commercial motor vehicle that has been loaded in a manner that makes inspection of it's cargo impracticable.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

392.9.b.4 The rules of paragraph(b) do not apply to the driver of a sealed commercial motor vehicle who has been ordered not to open it to inspect it's cargo or to the driver of a commercial motor vehicle that has been loaded in a manner that makes inspection of it's cargo impracticable.

Exactly. However, if you read the response to that question, there’s a twist. If the “seal” is just a padlock being used by the driver, one to which the driver has the key, then they can be held responsible for load securement and checks. The likelihood of an officer every upholding it is probably slim to done, but it does exist and because of that, drivers do need to be aware of it.

Commercial Motor Vehicle:

A commercial motor vehicle is any vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers or property with either:

  • A gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more
  • A gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more which includes a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Yes indeed this area is for ooen deck drivers. Like has been said it could apply to others if not sealed. For any box and tanker drivers I highly recommend you pickup some extra seals and keep them in the truck. IF a customer doesn’t seal a load you should. Keeps you complaint with this rule we are talking about, that alot of drivers don’t know, but also a very quick reference if someone has messed around with your trailer.,

Another thing people forget is if your hauling hazmat whenever you stop you are required to log a safety check. No time or distance requirement on it, just when you stop.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

With that being said….while not a legal requirement to stop for checks in 3 hrs or 150 miles , whenever you do stop it is ALWAYS a good idea to check for irregularities, loose lugs,or leaks and flats. Especially on the inner tires

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More