Securing Boxes Of Potato Chips?

Topic 31164 | Page 1

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Davy A.'s Comment
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I had a load of lays potato chips, just standard size boxes, not palletized, no shrink wrap, stacked floor to almost ceiling, back to the 45 foot line or so, in between where I could click in straps and a load lock wouldn't really do much. A cargo net would probably work but I've never seen one used and not sure how to attach it.

Of course the last several rows of boxes fell over, no apparent damage, how do you secure that type of load?

Rob T.'s Comment
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I'm not sure about chips, but 12 years ago I worked at Schwan's unloading floor loaded trucks. Mainly cases of red baron, freshchetta and Tony's pizza. They stacked the cases 5 feet high straight up the entire truck roughly 2000 cases. Used a load bar at roughly 2 feet and 4 feet and never had problems. Obviously pizzas are heavier so I'm not sure what proper placement would be.

Another warehouse job I had at Deli Express (convenience store sandwiches) we loaded everything on the floor and at the end used sheets of plywood with straps/load bars to hold in place.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Trucker Chris (CK)'s Comment
member avatar

I typically use two load locks/bars for that and had those types of loads often when i ran western regional , they've never shifted or toppled. If in doubt, add another load lock. I typically carry 8 just so I never get caught with less than I need.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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If there are no specific instructions from the shipper , nor on the dispatch notes from dispatch, I don't secure anything that light in weight. I have yet to get a bag of chips where every piece was intact.

My reasoning is if the shipper doesn't care (from the manner in which it was loaded), I'm not going through a lot of extra effort to preserve their potato chips. The only thing I've ever adhered to was specific low elevation driving routes. Elevations greater than 8,000 feet will pop the bags open.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

If there are no specific instructions from the shipper , nor on the dispatch notes from dispatch, I don't secure anything that light in weight. I have yet to get a bag of chips where every piece was intact.

My reasoning is if the shipper doesn't care (from the manner in which it was loaded), I'm not going through a lot of extra effort to preserve their potato chips. The only thing I've ever adhered to was specific low elevation driving routes. Elevations greater than 8,000 feet will pop the bags open.

That's all we had listed. The shipper and receiver didn't seem to care at all about securing it.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Antron's Comment
member avatar

The only thing I've ever adhered to was specific low elevation driving routes. Elevations greater than 8,000 feet will pop the bags open.

Learn something new everyday

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

My first job was working for a potato chip distributor, he never secured the boxes when he left the warehouse. At the store you'd pop the door open and catch whatever fell out.

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The only thing I've ever adhered to was specific low elevation driving routes. Elevations greater than 8,000 feet will pop the bags open.

double-quotes-end.png

Learn something new everyday

Difference in air pressure. It's the same reason that ears usually pop during a flight. It's also the reason why microwave heating times are slightly longer at higher elevations.

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