States That Don’t Use Snow Plows

Topic 31260 | Page 2

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Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Exactly

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I am an inexperienced Truck driver from Wisconsin. I took a job out of state in MO and am aware that other states don’t use snow plows. I would like to know which ones don’t so I can be aware when I encounter snow this season. I’m looking just for a simple list. I googled it of course but they didn’t have that information so I thought I would get the information here if I could. Thank you.

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You are worrying about the wrong thing entirely. You need to be concerned about your ability to drive in snow. Until you are fully confident with your ability, maybe you should just park it and send an electronic message to your dispatcher.

Those states with snow plows can let snow build up and not get to it for a while, so you're still driving in snow with plows out there somewhere. Just slow down and take it easy.

Laura

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Exactly, exactly. Sorry, y'all. I was just 'trying' to provide the info asked for, haha! Laura, I LOVE your screen shot! I've shared it broadly, thanks!

Ohio is one of the WORST states for (not) plowing, but honestly its a 'non issue' for us. Tom does exactly that, checks OHGO and plans 'accordingly,' re: routing .... yet he's not one to 'not drive' for snow . . . anymore. (Used to be, tho!) FAB, being based in Joliet/Lemont, is TOTALLY FINE if Tom calls it, for a snow day. It's happened, truck right here in our driveway. Personal plow guy ~ $75.00 on speed dial. Safety first, company 2nd, wallet 3rd.

Experience and comfort level and common sense all need to come together. Right? Ya get experienced enough to be braver, and old enough to not be foolish. Fine Line.

Be safe, ALL !

~ Always, Anne ~

ps: 2 and 3 are interchangeable, haha! ONE is always, #1 !

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Obviously all the cold weather states are well set up for snow removal. The farther south you go, standards vary. Kansas does a fairly good job, but not as good as Wisconsin. Oklahoma is worse than Kansas. The less probability for ice and snow, the less resources devoted to it's removal.

Kind of a strange question.

Gregg M.'s Comment
member avatar

It is kind of a strange question, especially in the way it seems to have been asked. However it is actually a pretty valid one if you consider it this way - remember a few years back when Georgia caught some winter weather and pretty much just shut down? As an OTR driver I would definitely want to know ahead of time if a place I was headed was that completely unprepared for weather, so if I happen to be there when weather happens I know there is no help coming and my best play is to hunker down and wait it out.

Gregg

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Obviously all the cold weather states are well set up for snow removal. The farther south you go, standards vary. Kansas does a fairly good job, but not as good as Wisconsin. Oklahoma is worse than Kansas. The less probability for ice and snow, the less resources devoted to it's removal.

Kind of a strange question.

It is kind of a strange question, especially in the way it seems to have been asked. However it is actually a pretty valid one if you consider it this way - remember a few years back when Georgia caught some winter weather and pretty much just shut down? As an OTR driver I would definitely want to know ahead of time if a place I was headed was that completely unprepared for weather, so if I happen to be there when weather happens I know there is no help coming and my best play is to hunker down and wait it out.

Gregg

The words 'inexperienced' and 'driver' In the same initial post, makes ME feel his FEAR factor. Wisconsin & Missouri adds to it.

Merry Christmas, all !!!

Just me, as usual..haha!

~Anne~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

S.N.O.W.:

Slowly

Navigate

Or

Wait

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

As others have mentioned the farther south you get the less likely to encounter snow plows. I drive I35 down to KC quite frequently in the winter months and have no issues. Driving in snow is unfortunately part of our job. There's many times in states that have many plows you're still driving on less than ideal roads. Last year our local news (des moines ia) interviewed someone from the DOT and they said it takes each truck about an hour or more to complete their route before they go back over it. If you're on a less traveled roadway and snows really coming down it won't matter how many plows are out.

Road conditions also are affected by what they use to handle the ice. Some states ( IA, NE, MO,WI) roads are typically in much better shape that MN because they use a liquid salt brine mixed with salt. Minnesota is a mix of sand and salt which doesn't really work worth a damn below 15 degrees. There is a significant difference in road conditions from crossing the IA/MN border. Although it usually isn't as significant, there have been times I'm doing 30 or less on a sheet of ice and hit the border coming into IA and roads are dry and can do 65-70 with no issues.

The best way to handle winter driving is take advantage of the 511 apps mentioned and common sense. If the roads are bad just park it. Chances are they'll be greatly improved in a few hours. If you're paid by the mile it doesn't make sense to burn your clock, and the stress driving at 20 mph UNLESS it's to find a safe place to park.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Steven E.'s Comment
member avatar

I found this an interesting question so I did a couple of lookups.

Virtually every state that experiences significant snowfall during winter season maintains a fleet of snowplows to keep roads clear, particularly highways and major arteries.

The condition right now is is, a shortage of snowplow drivers in several areas. The pay isn't very good and the job involves driving in sometimes hazardous conditions.

The best plan is, to check ahead for road conditions where you need to go and drive accordingly.

Also, know the laws regarding passing snowplows. Doing so is against the law in some states, in others not.

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