Sleeper Berth...on A Customer Site?

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Caroline C.'s Comment
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Hi All! I am new to the trucking industry and have seen conflicting views on going under Sleeper Berth as opposed to On Duty while unloading on a customers site.

As a firm believer in regulations, I feel this should be On Duty, but can any one give some insight to this.

This scenario is in the oilfields which from my understanding could just fall under Waiting Time.

Appreciate the help in advance!

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

G-Town's Comment
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It’s perfectly legal to log in as Sleeper Berth as long as you actually go into the sleeper. It’s also okay to show on-duty for the first 10-15 minutes and immediately before departure, but off-duty while waiting to be loaded or unloaded.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Caroline C.'s Comment
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G-Town, thanks for the clarification on that. Is this a general rule or only specific to oilfields...I feel like it covers all divisions. Thanks again!

Mikey B.'s Comment
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I would opt for off-duty myself but as G-Town says, sleeper berth works but you must actually be in the sleeper berth, not sitting in the front seat.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I have used sleeper berth more than once (split sleeper berth) to preserve available on-duty hours. Otherwise... opt for Mikey’s advice. All legal, non-specific; applies to OTR , regional , dedicated, etc.

Please invest some time reviewing the content in this link:

Learn The Logbook Rules (HOS)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Caroline C.'s Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the feedback. Yes, I have been nose deep reviewing multiple regulations. Currently drafting policies so I am trying to cover a lot of "what ifs" prior to any issuing any of these out. I am not a driver, just new to the industry, my background is industrial manufacturing so OTR is a new arena for me.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Caroline... sorry no one welcomed you.

“Welcome”

What is your job function?

This link might be a very good primer to the trucking industry.

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Caroline... sorry no one welcomed you.

“Welcome”

What is your job function?

This link might be a very good primer to the trucking industry.

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Welcome from myself as well, Caroline!

Now that G'Town is back in the arena, my 'Welcome Wagon' abilities, aren't as often needed, haha!

(Much luv, G'Town ... always!!)

Keep asking, keep reading, Caroline!!!! These guys & gals will help you through it.

Additionally, I might add, one of our own moderators, Kearsey, has an EXCELLENT YouTube channel, that might help you out with some questions. She's an instructor and trainer for Prime.

Here's her link: Trucking Along w/Kearsey... awesome channel!

Best wishes!

~ Anne ~

(20plus years a trucker's wife!)

Caroline C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all of the resources, y'all are great! I am a safety assistant, one task is reviewing all driver logs and oh boy...the different situations that pop up. Also our loads are all primarily over sized, we also have some in the oilfields so its been interesting trying to learn and navigate all of these variables and permit restrictions. It's great though!

Thanks again for the warm welcome :)

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I could be wrong, but I think oilfield drivers do have some exceptions but no idea if they are specific to hours of service

FMCSA site will be a good resource for you

Thanks for all of the resources, y'all are great! I am a safety assistant, one task is reviewing all driver logs and oh boy...the different situations that pop up. Also our loads are all primarily over sized, we also have some in the oilfields so its been interesting trying to learn and navigate all of these variables and permit restrictions. It's great though!

Thanks again for the warm welcome :)

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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