TransForce Class A Or Class B??

Topic 31341 | Page 5

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TruckingMama's Comment
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Awesome! I’ll definitely look into blackhawk! I’ve already applied for US Express and they require OTR training before I can do anything. A lot of companies require that actually is what I’m finding out. And like you mentioned, the lack of hours on my certificate… has proven to be difficult. I had no idea 😑 Thank you for your ideas! They’ve been great. School bus drivers are not very respected out here clearly. My daughter just tested positive for covid as well so this is going to be interesting navigating trying to start my career while being quarantined 😬

Ps: Just talked to Tom on his 30; he said check out BlackHawk; they have a huge presence out there. A buddy of ours up the road is an O/O that pulls for them; has for years. They ARE flatbed; however all no touch.

Another in the CO area .. from same person of reference, is Progress Rail. You'd haul rail parts/components on a flatbed, in a daycab.

Something(s) to look at!!!

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

TruckingMama's Comment
member avatar

Thank you! I have been applying to those positions like crazy, nothing yet. But hopefully one of them will call me for an interview

Shantiwa you might consider construction (dump truck or concrete), home heating oil delivery, propane delivery, roll off, and trash/recycling pickup. All local jobs, class B.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
TruckingMama's Comment
member avatar

Oh wow, I did call the recruiter back and got mote info. He said it’s an electric pallet Jack and I’d actually be delivering to rec centers, churches, food banks and places like that. Which he failed to mention to me beforehand… but anyways yeah I’ll look into JB hunt. I know that a few others mentioned them as well. I think they’re the only company I’ve not applied for at this point 😂

Nope...just me and a 2 wheel dolly. It was very demanding. I would come home pretty stiff and sore (but I could tell it was at least building up more noticeable muscle lol)

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So no pallet jacks? I’m wondering if I’ll really be able to do this even just to have a job for now and get a better one once I have more experience. I’m tough, but I currently have busted up hip joints. Broken bones floating around in both hip joints. I really don’t know how I passed my DOT physical. God has really been involved in this whole process for sure

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Hey there!

I worked for Transforce for a bit. I was trying to put my Class A to use, but didn't have the experience required to take on those positions. I was placed on the assignment of delivering wine and spirits in a straight truck. It was HEAVY touch, and that was the main reason I got out of it (started getting nagging elbow pain).

Good company from my experience, but an even better opportunity opened up for me 😁😁😁

Good luck!

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Hey y’all, I just got done talking with TransForce and they’re willing to hire me! There’s two situations they’d hire me for. 1. Class B local box truck unloading for produce carriers, here in Colorado Springs where I live. $21 an hr 6am-6pm M-F Do this job until I can move up to Henderson area for their new graduate Class A position OR 2. Just take the job up in Henderson about a 1.5 hr drive for the class A new graduate position $33 hr touch freight for produce 4-6am start time and 10-14 hours a day M-F

My concerns are with finding a babysitter for my kids and the travel time before I can move up to that area. Also, what do y’all think about TransForce?

Thank you!!

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DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I did call the recruiter back and got mote info. He said it’s an electric pallet Jack and I’d actually be delivering to rec centers, churches, food banks and places like that. Which he failed to mention to me beforehand

That doesn't sound too bad then. Is that the Class B job? If it is I'd probably jump on that for the time being. It isn't as exciting as Class A but it's a foot in the door if they're willing to allow you to bump to the class A vehicle later on. You'll get a better feel for driving something bigger in heavy traffic, the hours spent in the truck driving, and the company itself without needing to commute over an hour.

OD is a great company but P&D worries me for new drivers. Often times new drivers don't have the experience or discipline to remain calm when traffic starts getting impatient as you're trying to back off a busy roadway. You may easily have 12 or more stops in a day. LTL (and most other local jobs) operate in a seniority based system. Guys/gals that have been there longer get the runs they want. Though there are some drivers that love the challenge of working in heavily populated areas, chances are you'll spend a majority of your time in downtown Denver backing into tight alley ways and off the street. Other times you'll end up throwing on your hazards and using a pallet jack (not electric) and your lift gate to push the pallet to where the customer wants it. With OD it would also be important to know if you'd have a set route right away or work the "extra board". Bobcat and Banks, among others, would be able to explain that more if you'd like. Depending on the company you may just do dock work until they need someone to cover a route due to call ins/vacation etc. At most LTL they bid (select their run) for a year or so. If you're at the bottom in seniority you don't have a choice you're stuck with whatever everybody else didn't want. We've seen many people derail their careers by starting locally, especially P&D. We've also seen a few people start that way and thrive.

For others reading this typically I'd recommend going straight into Class A work if you're licensed to do such but due to Shantiwa being a single parent it makes it more difficult especially due to long hours.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

BK's Comment
member avatar

I didn’t read all the responses here, but I hope somebody told you that both options are burn-out situations for you. I hope you can wait it out and find a better situation. Don’t jump from the frying pan into the fire. And nobody wants you falling asleep somewhere on the road, especially the kiddos.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bruce, please explain your point here. What options are burn out?

I didn’t read all the responses here, but I hope somebody told you that both options are burn-out situations for you. I hope you can wait it out and find a better situation. Don’t jump from the frying pan into the fire. And nobody wants you falling asleep somewhere on the road, especially the kiddos.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Bruce, please explain your point here. What options are burn out?

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I didn’t read all the responses here, but I hope somebody told you that both options are burn-out situations for you. I hope you can wait it out and find a better situation. Don’t jump from the frying pan into the fire. And nobody wants you falling asleep somewhere on the road, especially the kiddos.

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I think she would burn out with the long commute and the long class A driving job plus being a single mom, that’s a difficult combination of work and responsibility. My concern for her driving the box truck class B, would be the frequent unloading and the 12 hours a day. I admire her ambition but I think she would eventually find either option unsustainable. I’m just hoping she can find a better, less strenuous job.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I’ve seen plenty of female drivers in food service or ltl over the years Bruce. She’s been looking for options. Since she has to go local most jobs will be touch freight at some capacity. I have no doubt if she moves forward with Transforce she will excel.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
BK's Comment
member avatar

I’ve seen plenty of female drivers in food service or ltl over the years Bruce. She’s been looking for options. Since she has to go local most jobs will be touch freight at some capacity. I have no doubt if she moves forward with Transforce she will excel.

You may be right, but she needs to factor in the possible dangers. Not trying to be a naysayer here. I hope she makes a good decision and has great success.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
TruckingMama's Comment
member avatar

Rob, yes I called the recruiter about the class B position. I think that position is going to be filled by somebody else at this point unfortunately. I went through the entire hiring process and did all the paperwork and all I had to do was get the drug test done and then my daughter tested positive for Covid and I was unable to get the drug test done. I did call my recruiter and they said they would reschedule my drug test but there is no guarantee that position will still be available to me but they will still keep me in mind for other positions by the time I’m out of quarantine.

OD Did say that they would train me pretty well before letting me go on my own routes, but I will ask them about the pallet jacks and which route I would be getting. I didn’t think of that, thank you for letting me know.

Bruce, I understand what you’re saying and thank you for your concern about getting burnt out and my role as a mother. I knew coming into this that it was going to be very difficult and I was going to have to work harder than most people to get where I want and I’m OK with that. I’m not taking jobs that I know that I physically cannot do or drive the commute for but nothing in my life has ever been easy and I have a lot of fight in me and determination to succeed especially since becoming a single mother. In my eyes getting a position where I don’t touch the freight as much is something that has to be earned and worked hard for so I will put in the extra work at a company to earn that. Thank you for your understandable concern!

Thank you for everyone’s advice and help through this process, I’m almost there, no matter what job I get will be such a blessing for my family. I can’t wait for the new beginning this will bring. I’ll finally be able to provide for my kids. I won’t have to go hungry to feed them anymore, they won’t have to go without warm clothes or proper shoes, we won’t ever have to be in a run down, dangerous hotel room again, or a strangers basement. I just can’t wait to be able to simply provide the essentials for my kids! I just want to give them a life they deserve. God is so great y’all, and thank you for y’all’s advice, I’m super grateful 🙏🏼🙏🏼😁😁

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