CDL CLP Knowledge Testing-Do You Take The Tests All At Once Or Individually?

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Craig M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello-

I have to say that I'm really surprised at how complicated the process is to get a CDL. I'm enrolling at a local tech college for the ELDT and need to have my CLP to start there. I'm studying the manual and was wondering, are you able to test each section individually or do you take all the tests at one time? Glad I found this resource. I plan to use the course here after I finish reading the manual.

Thank you all for being so generous with your time and knowledge.

Craig

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

I crash studied the High Roads Training material for a week and then took all of my exams at the same time in AR. I took every endorsement exam just in case.

It was most efficient for me to do it this way.

Thomas D.'s Comment
member avatar

I crash studied the High Roads Training material for a week and then took all of my exams at the same time in AR. I took every endorsement exam just in case.

It was most efficient for me to do it this way.

I did the same thing, and when I tested at the WV DMV , I took each test individually and was asked after each one if I wished to continue to the next test. They explained the number of questions involved, and the number required to pass each part. Idk about your DMV, but in WV the test is given on computer, and when I acheived the minimum required to pass, the test ended.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Onsdag's Comment
member avatar

Hello-

I have to say that I'm really surprised at how complicated the process is to get a CDL. I'm enrolling at a local tech college for the ELDT and need to have my CLP to start there. I'm studying the manual and was wondering, are you able to test each section individually or do you take all the tests at one time? Glad I found this resource. I plan to use the course here after I finish reading the manual.

Thank you all for being so generous with your time and knowledge.

Craig

I don't know if other states differ (I doubt it), but in Utah the CDL written exam (to get your learner's permit) you will have to take and pass 3 tests: 1) General knowledge, 2) Combination vehicle , and 3) Airbrakes. You will take all 3 tests at the same time, though they are technically separate sections, and will pay one fee for the test ($52 in Utah). You can also choose to take any of the endorsement tests at that time by paying a ($9 in Utah) fee for each additional test, which includes Tankers, Hazmat , Doubles/Triples, Passenger, and Schoolbus.

I don't know if you are allowed to take each test separately (i.e. take/pass the 3 required, go home, study for and then return later to take whatever endorsements you want). I'm pretty sure you can add the endorsements later, but I would recommend going ahead and studying for and taking everything all at once. The actual tests don't take very long and doing so seems more practical to me than returning to the DMV later to retest. The only real reason I would consider taking them separately is if finances are limited. Even then I'd just save up and do it all at once.

Also, I think you do have to wait to take the hazmat endorsement until you're cleared by the TSA. Other than that though I see no reason not to take them all at once.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

AR does it same as WV. Computerized test ends when 80% correct achieved. So all my scores were 80%.

I did the Hazmat endorsement prior to the new ELDT law taking effect, so I didn’t need to take a class.

I actually just hauled a hazmat load of a class 3 flammable liquid in my reefer with temp control.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Hello-

I have to say that I'm really surprised at how complicated the process is to get a CDL. I'm enrolling at a local tech college for the ELDT and need to have my CLP to start there. I'm studying the manual and was wondering, are you able to test each section individually or do you take all the tests at one time? Glad I found this resource. I plan to use the course here after I finish reading the manual.

Thank you all for being so generous with your time and knowledge.

Craig

Howdy, Craig .. and WELCOME!

Exactly what the guys above mentioned; they are truly 'in it' and going through it, right now. Each of these folks have excellent posts, and diaries to follow; and it's awesome to see them paying it forward, with their experiences.

It's been tough since 2003 (when my husband got his) and has become tougher, ever since. The 02/07/2022 didn't do the industry any justice, at all.

Have you read some of 'our' starter stuff, to begin with?

I'm really not SURE state wise, how this works! Some folks choose to go Company Paid to make it easier (and let the 'company' figure out the semantics, LoL!)

Anyway, again, welcome. Let us know how this plays out; SO MUCH keeps changing!

Best wishes;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Same deal here in PA, on a touch screen computer, get 80% correct, test ends!! I took 5 tests at one sitting, general knowledge, air brakes, combinations, tanker and doubles/triples. Went back and took the Hazmat after I had the class and passed the test during my ABF Freight driver development training.

I would suggest taking them all together as well. The High road training program here is top notch, it really makes sure you retain the info by mixing up how questions are worded. You need to know and understand the information, not just memorize answers

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Thomas D.'s Comment
member avatar

This was my experience, and how I handled it. I understand that everyone learns differently, but this worked for me. I went thru the HRT not once but twice many months ago, but once I decided to go full bore after my chance at becoming a driver I went to take the permit test at the DMV , and bombed the general knowledge portion at question 47. I thought I was prepared, but found out I wasn't. WV wouldn't allow me to retest until 7 days had elapsed, so I knew I had a week to truly prepare. I came back to HRT, reset my scores, and only studied the portions pertaining to the permit only. Then I took a couple of days away from studying. Reset my scores on HRT again, then the weekend before retesting I went back to HRT and the permit sections, and this time I decided to treat it like the DMV test. I didn't read the study material, just went straight to the quizzes at the end of each page. Monday I walk into the DMV and sit for the general knowledge test. I got 1 question wrong because I didn't read the question correctly. READ each question twice!! I missed a simple little word, the word NOT. I finished the test on question 41. I left the test room, was asked if I wanted to continue with the air brake portion of the test, returned to the same terminal that I was at before, and took the air brake portion. Took my time and read each question carefully, and didn't miss a single question. Repeated the process for combination vehicles, and the same result. All told, it took me 41 minutes from walking in to passing all three sections, and I give all the credit to the HRT program. Without it, I am reasonably confident I would have tanked test 2.

The only recommendation I would offer is a practice test similar to the DMV style testing in conjunction with the HRT program.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Start over after page crashed;

California is the same as WV computer testing, CDL is or was $76 when I tested in 2019.....Wasnt getting ANY endorsements, especially HM, and having to tons of scale house inspections a year just because ya got placards! NO Thanks! My mentor pulls HM and was inspected over 50 times last year, and he has to fight almost weekly to get his HM pay!

As for the rest of em, I figured I was in this 3 years, til I hit retirement, I just wanted to haul dry vans, and keep it simple, and safe ! Never hit anything, ran over any poles, etc lol

Did, go once last year, to try taking doubles/triples tests, fer chits n giggles n possibly drive for Fed-Ex, $46 for that test.. I bombed 2 times @ DMV quit, n saved my 3rd try, which I never went back to attempt lol Some stupid question(s) I shoulda known, zapped me, oh well, no biggee just wasted 46 bucks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Thomas D.'s Comment
member avatar

Mine was $32.50 for the permit, no endorsements. I have to get my CDL before background check for Hazmat , and each endorsement is $10.00 each, plus $7.50 for duplicate license fee. School bus and passenger endorsements require a skills test (anyone have a bus I could borrow?). rofl-3.gif rofl-2.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

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