Bad First Impression!

Topic 32032 | Page 1

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

So yes, I just started with a new company this very week. I always think it's a good idea to make a great first impression.

Instead, here I sit at a weigh station in Virginia with a preloaded 36,000 lb load with the tandems slid back as far as the law allows (41ft), and I'm at more than 35,000lbs on the tandems and 22,000lbs on my drives.

What can we learn from this?

Waiting for company to figure out what they want me to do. I was unaware of this fact: Virginia will allow you to carry your load within its borders for 24hrs after an overweight citation. Unfortunately I need to go into North Carolina where another violation can be assessed if I get pulled into a weigh station in that state.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

BK's Comment
member avatar

No your fault, right?

The only citation I’ve gotten in my short career was in Virginia for exactly the same reason.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

If it’s not Realdiehls fault who’s would it be Bruce? That’s the harsh reality. But with that said the same thing happened to me as well. Got a huge fine. Was way way overweight and had no idea. Never let it happen again. Made sure to scale our every time. Assumptions will get you in trouble.

No your fault, right?

The only citation I’ve gotten in my short career was in Virginia for exactly the same reason.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Not sure if Bruce was being sarcastic there.

Assumptions will get you in trouble.

That's the major lesson to be learned from something like this. Yes. The trailer was improperly loaded to account for weight distribution. But the driver is the last line of defense. As soon as you sign the bills, the load and all its potential problems are now in your hands. Companies like Prime have a device on their trailers to let you see the weight on the tandems and a meter in the cab to let you see the weight on the drives. Would have come in handy today.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

That's a very important reminder. I've just one a few loads inside of CA. Both were heavy, one at 44.5k and one at 41k. I skipped weighing the 41k as it was in the bay area and it was miles before I got to a fist scale my laziness in not weighing it could have got me into trouble. I weighed the second one, after I got to the J at the top of the grapevine. It was at 33.5k on my drives with about 50 gallons of fuel left. Tandems were fine.

But again. I got luck and at best would have gotten faulted for driving all the back to have the load reworked if it needed it. I'm picking up another CA load right now, first thing I'm doing is scaling it.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

BK's Comment
member avatar

Not sure if Bruce was being sarcastic there.

double-quotes-start.png

Assumptions will get you in trouble.

double-quotes-end.png

That's the major lesson to be learned from something like this. Yes. The trailer was improperly loaded to account for weight distribution. But the driver is the last line of defense. As soon as you sign the bills, the load and all its potential problems are now in your hands. Companies like Prime have a device on their trailers to let you see the weight on the tandems and a meter in the cab to let you see the weight on the drives. Would have come in handy today.

RD, no sarcasm intended. It wasn’t your fault that this happened, so don’t fret. Bummer that it was the first day, but handling these things in a professional manner (as I’m sure you did), makes a great first impression.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

BK's Comment
member avatar

If it’s not Realdiehls fault who’s would it be Bruce? That’s the harsh reality. But with that said the same thing happened to me as well. Got a huge fine. Was way way overweight and had no idea. Never let it happen again. Made sure to scale our every time. Assumptions will get you in trouble.

double-quotes-start.png

No your fault, right?

The only citation I’ve gotten in my short career was in Virginia for exactly the same reason.

double-quotes-end.png

Whose fault? Some things happen and nobody is at fault. We can always blame the devil, lol

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

You are a hundred percent wrong Bruce. We both know that. But I don’t have time to dignify this response any further.

John M.'s Comment
member avatar

I have to ask, did this load pickup out of Inwood WV by any chance? Btw I’ve not weighed loads that weighed more than that, put they were usually pulling very smoothly. Whoever loaded that trailer didnt know what they were doing.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Not sure if Bruce was being sarcastic there.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Assumptions will get you in trouble.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

That's the major lesson to be learned from something like this. Yes. The trailer was improperly loaded to account for weight distribution. But the driver is the last line of defense. As soon as you sign the bills, the load and all its potential problems are now in your hands. Companies like Prime have a device on their trailers to let you see the weight on the tandems and a meter in the cab to let you see the weight on the drives. Would have come in handy today.

double-quotes-end.png

RD, no sarcasm intended. It wasn’t your fault that this happened, so don’t fret. Bummer that it was the first day, but handling these things in a professional manner (as I’m sure you did), makes a great first impression.

You are a hundred percent wrong Bruce. We both know that. But I don’t have time to dignify this response any further.

So yes, I just started with a new company this very week. I always think it's a good idea to make a great first impression.

Instead, here I sit at a weigh station in Virginia with a preloaded 36,000 lb load with the tandems slid back as far as the law allows (41ft), and I'm at more than 35,000lbs on the tandems and 22,000lbs on my drives.

What can we learn from this?

Waiting for company to figure out what they want me to do. I was unaware of this fact: Virginia will allow you to carry your load within its borders for 24hrs after an overweight citation. Unfortunately I need to go into North Carolina where another violation can be assessed if I get pulled into a weigh station in that state.

No sarcasm, nor S's & G's here, gang . . . but in all sincerity, see this is the stuff I've never learned. Tanks, well... are 'tankless' or vis a vis. Okay, jokes aside. Is there NO WAY that this couldn't have been made 'legal' what with the total GVWR et al .. and the tandems and kingpin settings?

Seriously; I wasn't 'with' when Tom was pulling boxes OTR , and intrastate doesn't count. Intriguing and unnerving it is.

So ... what to do? Rework? 'Run with it?' I see that you ARE getting it reworked/assessed. RD, since it's only a 'few pounds,' BUT ..had you been with "other company C" for quite awhile and were an ole' hand there, would you just go with it? I'm asking seriously. When something 'minor' becomes 'major' and we're not talking staffs & clefs.

(What IS that do'hickey that Prime has that others do not?)

I'm just trying to learn here, guys. This is a very interesting thread, to me and future greens. Appreciated, y'all.

Thanks, RD;

Sorry for your conundrum, however.

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

GVWR:

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

GVWR is the maximum operating weight of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer, minus any trailers.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Choosing A Trucking Company Hard Lessons Learned Truck Driving Orientation Truck Driving Stories Weight and Scales
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More