Consistent Miles Working Part-Time

Topic 32078 | Page 1

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JJ's Comment
member avatar

I obtained my Class A CDL not too long ago. Due to some personal problems, I couldn't jump into driving full time. I'm going back to school to complete my degree but I am exploring the possibility of driving part time when I'm not in school. I was in the talks with Swift and a few other smaller regional carriers that were happy to take me on knowing my situation.

I'm asking since recruiters don't always tell the full truth. My questions for anybody who has driven or drives part-time: - how consistent are miles working PT? Does the industry generally use PT drivers as spot fillers? - are there issues getting back home on time regardless FT/PT?

I would be working weekends, possibly a weekday or two - then full time during breaks. Obviously school takes priority over the job, so I can't risk any possibility of being stuck out on the road. Having no experience in trucking, I don't know what to expect. Hoping some of the veteran drivers can shine some light on this. Trying to decide if I should pursue the trucking industry or just take a sales associate job for now.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, I have not heard of many opportunities for CDL A part time work for drivers without experience. Part time work is usually filling any gap the company has and being limited to weekends will hurt there.

I would hold off on trucking personally, if you had experience it wouldn't be a problem depending on your location. Without it I think it will be very difficult to find part time work.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the forum JJ.

Have you looked at this?

Your desired path into trucking is likely to fail. Unless you are willing and able to make a full time commitment and effort at this for at least 6-9 months, like Bobcat said; it’s highly unlikely any company will hire a PT driver with zero experience. I know for a fact Swift will not enter into an arrangement like this without some experience.

Unless you can jump in with both feet and yours eyes focused on a single goal…I encourage you to consider something else far less difficult.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I obtained my Class A CDL not too long ago. Due to some personal problems, I couldn't jump into driving full time. I'm going back to school to complete my degree but I am exploring the possibility of driving part time when I'm not in school. I was in the talks with Swift and a few other smaller regional carriers that were happy to take me on knowing my situation.

I'm asking since recruiters don't always tell the full truth. My questions for anybody who has driven or drives part-time: - how consnistent are miles working PT? Does the industry generally use PT drivers as spot fillers? - are there issues getting back home on time regardless FT/PT?

I would be working weekends, possibly a weekday or two - then full time during breaks. Obviously school takes priority over the job, so I can't risk any possibility of being stuck out on the road. Having no experience in trucking, I don't know what to expect. Hoping some of the veteran drivers can shine some light on this. Trying to decide if I should pursue the trucking industry or just take a sales associate job for now.

Hi, JJ ~

As mentioned above,

It's highly doubtful to land something like you are looking for, without 'paying your dues,' per se. A company that advertises part time accommodations, (at least on OUR TV, LoL..) is Rand's Trucking. I did some follow up, and it appears that they will extend this offer to drivers that have been with them, for some time prior, doing OTR.

Have you looked into Paving Gigs? I don't know who's out your way, but here in Ohio; Kokosing and The Shelly Company advertises part time Dump Drivers wanted, and winters off. PepsiCo and the similars may, as well.

As G'Town stated, it's highly doubtful that Swift would accommodate your needs/wants. Sometimes recruiters WILL tell you what you want to hear, rightfully so. That's their job, to get you in there!

Hope all works out for you in the long run; best wishes!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, I'd be concerned about your safety habits as a PT driver, and picking up very important needed information that only comes from experience.

I may be still considered a newbie (5/6/21-NOW) but I know for a fact that I would not feel even close to minimally competent without the full time daily grind of OTR. Splitting your attention between two different endeavors is also seriously problematic.

Trucking is one of those industries that you just have to jump in, with both feet, no hesitation. Anything less will set yourself up for an unpleasant and failing experience. That's if you don't kill someone when you mess up too.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, I'd be concerned about your safety habits as a PT driver, and picking up very important needed information that only comes from experience.

I may be still considered a newbie (5/6/21-NOW) but I know for a fact that I would not feel even close to minimally competent without the full time daily grind of OTR. Splitting your attention between two different endeavors is also seriously problematic.

Trucking is one of those industries that you just have to jump in, with both feet, no hesitation. Anything less will set yourself up for an unpleasant and failing experience. That's if you don't kill someone when you mess up too.

NaeNae notsonew, ;)

Well said, Ma'am.

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Glenbob's Comment
member avatar

Part time / casual positions are out there. Probably going to have to do full time for a period then change over. I’m currently doing that. My company requires minimum 5 days (straight) a month. When working part time I do 10-14 days OTR to make it financially worthwhile. Some months I work the whole month as they leave up to me as long as I do the minimum. As far as weekends and a day here and there through the week are not feasible IMO. If you could find local delivery company or something hourly, maybe box truck, finale mile it might work. Good luck in your endeavors.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

James H.'s Comment
member avatar

I obtained my Class A CDL not too long ago. Due to some personal problems, I couldn't jump into driving full time.

If I were you, I'd act very quickly before that CDL goes stale. This is one situation where Use It or Lose It holds true.

My questions for anybody who has driven or drives part-time: - how consistent are miles working PT? Does the industry generally use PT drivers as spot fillers? - are there issues getting back home on time regardless FT/PT?

I don't claim any knowledge of how 'the industry generally' uses PT drivers. I'm PT/casual (after doing 7+ months full time linehaul) and have a pretty stable two days a week, plus occasional filling in. Driving local, my pay is hourly rather than by mile, and it's not a matter of getting routed back home. However, even with a local job things will come up. As an example, last Friday I got stuck at a RR crossing by a very slow, very long train, then was an hour late getting loaded at my first stop, then hit overnight construction on the GWB. Nothing terrible, or out of the ordinary. But in your situation, getting done driving at 5:30 to get to a 7:00 class isn't something you can really count on.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
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