New To Forum; Not As New To Trucking

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Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

I look forward to learning from drivers who have been doing this job much longer than I, while also being a resource to those thinking of trucking and those who have just started.

--Ryan

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

Ryan, great to have you onboard. I hope you will become a regular contributor.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Ryan, great to have you onboard. I hope you will become a regular contributor.

That's my intention.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

I look forward to learning from drivers who have been doing this job much longer than I, while also being a resource to those thinking of trucking and those who have just started.

--Ryan

Hay Ryan, and welcome to Trucking Truth!

I'm not a 'driver,' just married to one for 22 active years. Some good stuff in the drop down menu up to the left, are the blogs and podcasts, for sure.

The experienced drivers and moderators on here, are awesome in and of themselves, too. We always love 'fresh faces' for input and contributions, glad to have ya!!

Care to share the company in North Central Ohio???? This is where we live. Is it regional , dedicated, or ?!?!? We may have crossed paths, never know.

Sadly, my guy's company is 'limiting' operations before too long; he may still stay with FAB, having to travel south to Newark for the commute. We aren't sure yet; looking at other options, as well. Being regional/local/intrastate for the last six years doesn't leave OTR looking too enticing to him these days, LoL. Valley (in Ashland) called him last week; and we talk to JRayl often, as well.

Well, best to you; enjoy the camaraderie up in here, for sure.

~ Anne & Tom ~

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome!! Always nice to get additional perspectives.

Alex K.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

I look forward to learning from drivers who have been doing this job much longer than I, while also being a resource to those thinking of trucking and those who have just started.

--Ryan

Hey, Ryan! I feel like you have a cool perspective in that you're experienced enough to be a source of knowledge, yet everything about making the leap into OTR is still fresh in your mind since it's all happened within the past year.

Out of my sheer, "non-driver" curiosity, would you mind sharing a thing or two you wish you'd known right out of the gate? :-) Maybe something that would've enhanced the "good" or avoided the "bad" that you speak of...?

In any case, all the best to ya as you continue along your OTR journey!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

I look forward to learning from drivers who have been doing this job much longer than I, while also being a resource to those thinking of trucking and those who have just started.

--Ryan

double-quotes-end.png

Hey, Ryan! I feel like you have a cool perspective in that you're experienced enough to be a source of knowledge, yet everything about making the leap into OTR is still fresh in your mind since it's all happened within the past year.

Out of my sheer, "non-driver" curiosity, would you mind sharing a thing or two you wish you'd known right out of the gate? :-) Maybe something that would've enhanced the "good" or avoided the "bad" that you speak of...?

In any case, all the best to ya as you continue along your OTR journey!

Again, sorry for asking re: company, Ryan. I'm hunting companies for my Tomster currently, so.. I know a few things, Ohio wise.

No, y'all . . . I did NOT call J'Rayl ... but I'm sure a good 'guesstimator,' am I not ?!?!?

J/K man. Don't let me scare you away! They're a great company....for sure.

Glad to have you, as all the others have said. No need to confirm nor deny, LoL! A fresh piece of SLICED bread, is always welcome!! :)

~ Anne & Tom ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Hi Ryan and welcome. Feel frée to ask any questions.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

I look forward to learning from drivers who have been doing this job much longer than I, while also being a resource to those thinking of trucking and those who have just started.

--Ryan

double-quotes-end.png

Hay Ryan, and welcome to Trucking Truth!

I'm not a 'driver,' just married to one for 22 active years. Some good stuff in the drop down menu up to the left, are the blogs and podcasts, for sure.

The experienced drivers and moderators on here, are awesome in and of themselves, too. We always love 'fresh faces' for input and contributions, glad to have ya!!

Care to share the company in North Central Ohio???? This is where we live. Is it regional , dedicated, or ?!?!? We may have crossed paths, never know.

Sadly, my guy's company is 'limiting' operations before too long; he may still stay with FAB, having to travel south to Newark for the commute. We aren't sure yet; looking at other options, as well. Being regional/local/intrastate for the last six years doesn't leave OTR looking too enticing to him these days, LoL. Valley (in Ashland) called him last week; and we talk to JRayl often, as well.

Well, best to you; enjoy the camaraderie up in here, for sure.

~ Anne & Tom ~

I spent a little bit of time perusing parts of the site before posting, so I will say definitely a wealth of information here.

Company I work for is a small company hauling for a family farm. Not the best pay out there, but it's a really nice environment. They don't treat drivers like family (too much drama in that); they treat drivers like highly valued employees.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I have a year of OTR under my belt, and in that year I have experienced just about everything a driver may expect to experience, both good and bad. I work for a company located in north central Ohio and live in southeastern Michigan.

I look forward to learning from drivers who have been doing this job much longer than I, while also being a resource to those thinking of trucking and those who have just started.

--Ryan

double-quotes-end.png

Hey, Ryan! I feel like you have a cool perspective in that you're experienced enough to be a source of knowledge, yet everything about making the leap into OTR is still fresh in your mind since it's all happened within the past year.

Out of my sheer, "non-driver" curiosity, would you mind sharing a thing or two you wish you'd known right out of the gate? :-) Maybe something that would've enhanced the "good" or avoided the "bad" that you speak of...?

In any case, all the best to ya as you continue along your OTR journey!

Great questions. I wish I had known that time off is often not really time off. What I mean by that is going off duty usually means there is still work to do, like trip planning, paperwork, checking messages for any permanent information, etc. I also wish that I had known how difficult finding a truck entrance can sometimes be. It's definitely not simply put address into GPS and follow it to the destination. I wish I had known how crazy and oblivious 4-wheelers can be when maneuvering around trucks. Lots of people just don't seem to understand that pulling in front of a truck going down hill means leaving lots of space before making the move. I wish I had known how much money can be made, but also how much money can easily be spent, being an OTR driver. A truck driver can make really nice paychecks, but a truck driver can easily run right through it if spending too much time in truck stops looking at all the goodies and gadgets. My suggestion is to get the necessary items and tools, buy healthy food from grocery stores, and stay away from the knickknacks and gadgets at truck stops. Buy headsets off eBay or Amazon. Get a trucker GPS off eBay or Amazon. Get a CB off eBay or Amazon. Or, run without a CB. I still don't have a CB, so it's really not something needed. I had a trainer tell me that it will often prove to be more of a distraction than an asset for new drivers.

I am glad that backing was a struggle for me early on. I mean, it was a real struggle. But, it forced me to work hard on it. Now backing is one of my strengths. I take my time, make smart decisions, get out and look when needed, and go slow. I never refuse help when offered. I show appreciation once the backing is complete. Being a good driver requires confidence, humility, and courtesy. Those three attributes will take a rookie driver far in becoming a seasoned driver with years of experience. At least, many of the long time drivers I have known have had those 3 attributes.

--Ryan

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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