How Bad Is It If You Don't Train On A Manual?

Topic 32284 | Page 3

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Turtle's Comment
member avatar
. But no driver should shy away from a truck driving job because of this issue.

Nobody is saying that. I'm saying no driver should shy afraid from learning and testing in a manual. That's it. After the license is obtained, a driver is free to pursue any job they want, whether in a manual or auto.

I much prefer the automatics I drive over the manuals. That isn't the question. I would still refuse to have the auto restriction attached to me when a simple test is all that's in my way. Advising someone to saddle themselves with that restriction is just irresponsible from an advisor, in my opinion.

wouldn’t you agree that newbies should not let that issue determine their career path?

No, I wouldn't. Because it wasn't an issue until those of you afraid to handle a stick began advising others to be afraid of it too. It's a non-issue, and always has been. There are incredibly rewarding opportunities out there for drivers who have the guts to get past a minor short-term fear and realize the benefits of tackling that fear. There are far bigger issues in trucking to be intimidated by than shifting a few gears.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Klutch's Comment
member avatar

I’m at Schneider still yeah, finished my contract early last month. They do not offer training on manual.

There are not many driving opportunities in my home town, most LTL run the area out of Vermont or from Albany. The local one that was hiring still has a good amount of manuals in their fleet.

The other local companies are mostly food service or fuel delivery. Waiting to hear back from Sysco.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Bruce… look Man, my point is there is a whole world of jobs once you have experience that might require a manual. Most LTL jobs will require it. Most of the cement companies and excavation outfits around here are manual fleets. The job I have now, requires it. Best trucking job I’ve had thus far.

Again if at all possible, learn how-to drive a manual in school. It’s the best place to learn this. If the thought of that scares the bee-geezus out of you… don’t attempt it.

Peace.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m at Schneider still yeah, finished my contract early last month. They do not offer training on manual.

There are not many driving opportunities in my home town, most LTL run the area out of Vermont or from Albany. The local one that was hiring still has a good amount of manuals in their fleet.

The other local companies are mostly food service or fuel delivery. Waiting to hear back from Sysco.

There is a company with a huge plant in your hometown called Schluter Systems. Do they have their own trucks?

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Bruce… look Man, my point is there is a whole world of jobs once you have experience that might require a manual. Most LTL jobs will require it. Most of the cement companies and excavation outfits around here are manual fleets. The job I have now, requires it. Best trucking job I’ve had thus far.

Again if at all possible, learn how-to drive a manual in school. It’s the best place to learn this. If the thought of that scares the bee-geezus out of you… don’t attempt it.

Peace.

Cross posted:

Yep, one of the FIRST things Cassie asked Tom, w/PittOhio: "You don't have that E restriction, do you? (Nope.) You have all your endorsements?" To which he replied, "Need to re'up my HazMat is all." She said they'll pay for that. Is it easier because he's had it before, anyone know??? Hmmmm... research time again, Anne!

There's an assignment for ya, BK... find OUT for me, haha!

~ Anne ~

ps: I do believe that in the LTL and specialty niches, it's necessary to have the ability to drive manual. Mentioned many times; there could've been days off, unwanted, had Tom not been able to drive one of the spares; manual.

pps: Bird One .. BRAGGART ! (J/K .. YA KNOW I'm jealous, haha!) Gorgeous stuff, man! Do they even MAKE hoods like that, in auto? Don't know, doubt it.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

If I could go back and start with a company that offered the training on manual, I would. I had no desire to drive manual but as previously mentioned, it has cost me an opportunity already that would be ideal for where I live and the hometime I am looking for.

Shame.

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Totally 100% agree with Bird-One. Like his employer, our fleet is comprised entirely of manual transmission trucks.

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I agree with Turtle on this as I always will. Manual was simply how you got your cdl until autos came out. Than suddenly that was just the best way to go. I can promise you op I didn’t have a single lick of any kind of manual driving experience prior to getting my cdl. Three and half weeks of cdl school and I was shifting gears.

You never know what opportunities you may come across out here. Below are just two trucks from my company I get to drive everyday. We have no auto’s. Sure coming company across a company like mine might be rare. There are probably a half dozen if not more different companies in the Chicagoland with different niches where the majority of trucks are manual.

0716148001662394836.jpg

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G-Town, I know you are proficient with a manual, as is Turtle, Bird One and many other drivers. I can do manual, but have been an auto-mated disciple since I first drove one. While it is good to know how to drive a manual, wouldn’t you agree that newbies should not let that issue determine their career path?

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What kept you from getting the restriction removed?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Because it’s not as easy as you think…

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If I could go back and start with a company that offered the training on manual, I would. I had no desire to drive manual but as previously mentioned, it has cost me an opportunity already that would be ideal for where I live and the hometime I am looking for.

Shame.

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Totally 100% agree with Bird-One. Like his employer, our fleet is comprised entirely of manual transmission trucks.

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I agree with Turtle on this as I always will. Manual was simply how you got your cdl until autos came out. Than suddenly that was just the best way to go. I can promise you op I didn’t have a single lick of any kind of manual driving experience prior to getting my cdl. Three and half weeks of cdl school and I was shifting gears.

You never know what opportunities you may come across out here. Below are just two trucks from my company I get to drive everyday. We have no auto’s. Sure coming company across a company like mine might be rare. There are probably a half dozen if not more different companies in the Chicagoland with different niches where the majority of trucks are manual.

0716148001662394836.jpg

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G-Town, I know you are proficient with a manual, as is Turtle, Bird One and many other drivers. I can do manual, but have been an auto-mated disciple since I first drove one. While it is good to know how to drive a manual, wouldn’t you agree that newbies should not let that issue determine their career path?

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What kept you from getting the restriction removed?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Klutch's Comment
member avatar

Schneider does not train on or run manuals so I can not simply get it removed. I would need to get my hands on a manual truck, a trainer and then I would need to retake the road exam with the manual. Not really easy at this point. Running 25/5 looking to get local and I never would have thought the auto restriction would be a pain point. Live and learn.

BK's Comment
member avatar

Bruce… look Man, my point is there is a whole world of jobs once you have experience that might require a manual. Most LTL jobs will require it. Most of the cement companies and excavation outfits around here are manual fleets. The job I have now, requires it. Best trucking job I’ve had thus far.

Again if at all possible, learn how-to drive a manual in school. It’s the best place to learn this. If the thought of that scares the bee-geezus out of you… don’t attempt it.

Peace.

Hey h G-Town, I totally agree with you that knowing how to drive a manual is a very good thing. If my company told me they had a manual and I was assigned that truck, I wouldn’t hesitate at all. But many potential drivers are scared about the manual issue. I see evidence of that concern here on TT , on a regular basis. I think they can relax about this issue and realize that they can get into driving with an auto restriction. Heck, I have an auto restriction but am I worried? Not at all.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Klutch. Exactly. And there’s practice…on your own time, without pay. And assuming you can actually lineup all the necessary pieces, by the time it’s all said and done the job might be gone.

Easier said than done.

Schneider does not train on or run manuals so I can not simply get it removed. I would need to get my hands on a manual truck, a trainer and then I would need to retake the road exam with the manual. Not really easy at this point. Running 25/5 looking to get local and I never would have thought the auto restriction would be a pain point. Live and learn.

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