Done With First Week On The Road

Topic 32473 | Page 1

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Driver_engineer 's Comment
member avatar

Done with first week on the road and am done for about 2 days then back on again. Even tho I was aiming at a local driving job I actually might prefer a sleeper and traveling cross country this was a awesome experience! The 2020 Freightliner Cascadia 73' sleeper is a cool truck and I loved driving it a few hours. Also learned something I thought for a long time was incorrect.. for a long time I thought you would get a expensive ticket if you were over weight. Well we picked a load up stopped at a weight station was overweight and we turned around off loaded a little came back was within normal weight and started the trip no expensive ticket 😂

It was a awesome experience shout-out to Schneider and my awesome experienced driver!!!

I will update at been on the road for a month

Klutch's Comment
member avatar

You guys got lucky not getting a ticket at the weigh station, your trainer should be taking the loads to the closest CAT scale , Schneider pays for it. Download the CAT app, put in your EFS card# and you can do everything through the app. The only time you’ll need to actually go in and get the scale ticket is if your dropping it off as a relay.

Done with first week on the road and am done for about 2 days then back on again. Even tho I was aiming at a local driving job I actually might prefer a sleeper and traveling cross country this was a awesome experience! The 2020 Freightliner Cascadia 73' sleeper is a cool truck and I loved driving it a few hours. Also learned something I thought for a long time was incorrect.. for a long time I thought you would get a expensive ticket if you were over weight. Well we picked a load up stopped at a weight station was overweight and we turned around off loaded a little came back was within normal weight and started the trip no expensive ticket 😂

It was a awesome experience shout-out to Schneider and my awesome experienced driver!!!

I will update at been on the road for a month

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Driver_engineer 's Comment
member avatar

I am going to get the app and to verify you can get tickets that you have to pay? Interesting

You guys got lucky not getting a ticket at the weigh station, your trainer should be taking the loads to the closest CAT scale , Schneider pays for it. Download the CAT app, put in your EFS card# and you can do everything through the app. The only time you’ll need to actually go in and get the scale ticket is if your dropping it off as a relay.

double-quotes-start.png

Done with first week on the road and am done for about 2 days then back on again. Even tho I was aiming at a local driving job I actually might prefer a sleeper and traveling cross country this was a awesome experience! The 2020 Freightliner Cascadia 73' sleeper is a cool truck and I loved driving it a few hours. Also learned something I thought for a long time was incorrect.. for a long time I thought you would get a expensive ticket if you were over weight. Well we picked a load up stopped at a weight station was overweight and we turned around off loaded a little came back was within normal weight and started the trip no expensive ticket 😂

It was a awesome experience shout-out to Schneider and my awesome experienced driver!!!

I will update at been on the road for a month

double-quotes-end.png

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Overweight tickets are on the driver to pay. You are the captain of that ship (truck). Some shippers will have their own scales, but most do not. Always verify with a CAT Scale. $13 is much cheaper than any overweight ticket.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

BK's Comment
member avatar

I really got lucky today. Picked up a load in Irving, TX for delivery to Goddard, KS. Oklahoma is very active weighing trucks entering on I35. I had a fuel stop in Denton, TX and I intended to scale at the fuel stop. But I forgot to scale. By the time I got to Oklahoma, it was too late and almost all the truck traffic was being pulled into the scales. Knowing I had a heavy load, I was very nervous as I took my turn on the scales. What a relief it was to get the signal to exit back to the interstate. I was only 500 lbs. under the limit on my drives. And that ticket would have been mine to pay had I been overweight. First time I forgot to scale. I hope it’s also my last. There are other things I’d rather spend my money on.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Done with first week on the road and am done for about 2 days then back on again. Even tho I was aiming at a local driving job I actually might prefer a sleeper and traveling cross country this was a awesome experience! The 2020 Freightliner Cascadia 73' sleeper is a cool truck and I loved driving it a few hours. Also learned something I thought for a long time was incorrect.. for a long time I thought you would get a expensive ticket if you were over weight. Well we picked a load up stopped at a weight station was overweight and we turned around off loaded a little came back was within normal weight and started the trip no expensive ticket 😂

It was a awesome experience shout-out to Schneider and my awesome experienced driver!!!

I will update at been on the road for a month

Congrats on the progress, D/E !!!

Yeah, watch those 'coops.' You did good, went back & reworked it. Many shippers have a scale on their lots, although not always as accurate as a CAT scale; which guarantees their numbers, or they'll pay your fine(s.)

What we (Tom) did/does, is .. if it's CLOSE to too heavy at the shipper's yard, stop at the first CAT scale . . anyway.

Better safe than sorry (and broke!)

Glad it's going well for ya;

~ Anne ~

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Drew D.'s Comment
member avatar

CAT scales are your friend. I have had to back travel after getting loaded before just incase due to there being a weight station just before the truck stop in the direction I had to go.

I do, however have a question for the vets.

If you have a total weight of say 76k but your tandems are off slightly when you hit a weight station, will they still pop you with a ticket? Like lets say your drives are 31k and your trailer is 35k. Or will they just inform you that you need to slide? This hasn't happened to me, but I was curious as to what the best and worst case scenarios are.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Cat Scales:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Old School's Comment
member avatar
If you have a total weight of say 76k but your tandems are off slightly when you hit a weight station, will they still pop you with a ticket? Like lets say your drives are 31k and your trailer is 35k. Or will they just inform you that you need to slide? This hasn't happened to me, but I was curious as to what the best and worst case scenarios are.

It honestly depends on the mood of the enforcement officer. I've experienced this go both ways. Once in Virginia the officer asked me if I could get my weight straightened out by adjusting my axle. I responded that I could and he allowed me to fix it and re-weigh. Another time in Louisiana the officer could have cared less that I could adjust it and make it right. He told me I'd have to wait and reconfigure my axles after he wrote me a citation.

I experienced both of these examples years ago. Now I almost know what I'm doing and I don't have near as much conflict with those guys, and I make a lot less bad choices.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Drew D.'s Comment
member avatar

Right on.

I was just curious.if My trainer said that as long as it is below 80k, they shouldn't break your balls over a slight misconfiguration. I didn't really believe that. I scale up at every opportunity. My company pays for my CAT tickets so there really is no excuse not to.

Thanks for sharing!

double-quotes-start.png

If you have a total weight of say 76k but your tandems are off slightly when you hit a weight station, will they still pop you with a ticket? Like lets say your drives are 31k and your trailer is 35k. Or will they just inform you that you need to slide? This hasn't happened to me, but I was curious as to what the best and worst case scenarios are.

double-quotes-end.png

It honestly depends on the mood of the enforcement officer. I've experienced this go both ways. Once in Virginia the officer asked me if I could get my weight straightened out by adjusting my axle. I responded that I could and he allowed me to fix it and re-weigh. Another time in Louisiana the officer could have cared less that I could adjust it and make it right. He told me I'd have to wait and reconfigure my axles after he wrote me a citation.

I experienced both of these examples years ago. Now I almost know what I'm doing and I don't have near as much conflict with those guys, and I make a lot less bad choices.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

OS is exactly correct. It depends on the officer. I had a situation like his in VA one night and they asked if I could adjust it and let me pull around back to do so. That was back in my box days.

The cat scale app is nice to have, as long as you don’t need to do a spit axle weight.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

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