Is $60k A Year Midwest Regional In Year 1 Realistic?

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Zen Joker (Andy)'s Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone,

Here I am again 10 years later as a remote employee of corporate America weighing truck driving again and currently unemployed. As I weigh options, I have a couple of questions for experienced drivers:

1) Roehl is advertising that the midwest regional fleet averages around $1200 per week. Is that reasonable to assume in year 1 OR is that year 2+. If so, what is a reasonable expectation for year 1?

2) I have a history of back problems and while every case is unique, I wanted to get some opinions to see if with a fairly clean diet, daily exercise if driving regionally 5 days a week is a practical consideration.

Thank you in advance for any feedback!

Andy (FKA Zen Joker)

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Suicide Jockey's Comment
member avatar

Short answer: Yes, if you're up to it.

I have no experience with Roehl. I started out with Prime over the road and exceeded that pay figure my first year, but I busted my butt to do it. Pay in this industry is most heavily affected by the individual driver, not the position they hold. In my current job hauling fuel we have drivers who make under 50k and drivers that make over 100k+ that do the exact same job on the same pay rate. The only difference is the drivers work ethic.

You feed yourself so the diet is 100% on you. I stocked my trucks refrigerator with weeks worth of food every time I went home. A regional position should make it easier to keep to a preferred diet.

Daily exercise is also 100% on you. Some drivers will run around the perimeter of a truck stop, or do pushups and jumping jacks next to their truck. Some keep resistance bands or weights in their truck to work out with. Others will even bring a bicycle with them. Your only limitation is you.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I would dig deep into the details of the Roehl pitch. Is it "all drivers will make X $$$", or "the TOP X % of our drivers CAN make X $"? A new driver will normally not be considered a top performer for at least a few years. It can take others much longer to learn this trade and maximize their earnings potential.

Zen Joker (Andy)'s Comment
member avatar

Short answer: Yes, if you're up to it.

I have no experience with Roehl. I started out with Prime over the road and exceeded that pay figure my first year, but I busted my butt to do it. Pay in this industry is most heavily affected by the individual driver, not the position they hold. In my current job hauling fuel we have drivers who make under 50k and drivers that make over 100k+ that do the exact same job on the same pay rate. The only difference is the drivers work ethic.

You feed yourself so the diet is 100% on you. I stocked my trucks refrigerator with weeks worth of food every time I went home. A regional position should make it easier to keep to a preferred diet.

Daily exercise is also 100% on you. Some drivers will run around the perimeter of a truck stop, or do pushups and jumping jacks next to their truck. Some keep resistance bands or weights in their truck to work out with. Others will even bring a bicycle with them. Your only limitation is you.

Thanks SJ!! Work ethic and self discipline are no issue here. Have a wife and 10 year old depending on me. I'm honestly expecting $45-50k in year 1 to be conservative. THANKS AGAIN!!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Xero O.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't know if these are accurate or not but some of these places pay really well. https://www.truckdriverssalary.com/

Walmart is probably the first place I'll apply once I get my physical sorted out. The smart trucking YouTube channel always advertises for GP Transco. I'll have to see if they have a terminal near me.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Zen Joker (Andy)'s Comment
member avatar

I don't know if these are accurate or not but some of these places pay really well. https://www.truckdriverssalary.com/

Walmart is probably the first place I'll apply once I get my physical sorted out. The smart trucking YouTube channel always advertises for GP Transco. I'll have to see if they have a terminal near me.

Thanks!!!!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone,

Here I am again 10 years later as a remote employee of corporate America weighing truck driving again and currently unemployed. As I weigh options, I have a couple of questions for experienced drivers:

1) Roehl is advertising that the midwest regional fleet averages around $1200 per week. Is that reasonable to assume in year 1 OR is that year 2+. If so, what is a reasonable expectation for year 1?

2) I have a history of back problems and while every case is unique, I wanted to get some opinions to see if with a fairly clean diet, daily exercise if driving regionally 5 days a week is a practical consideration.

Thank you in advance for any feedback!

Andy (FKA Zen Joker)

$60k is totally realistic for the first year, but as others said yes it will be hard work. It definitely takes some time to get proficient at everything

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Zen Joker (Andy)'s Comment
member avatar

Just to confirm your comment, this would be Midwest Regional (not OTR) at Roehl with 45 hours of weekly hometime. Honestly in the first 12 months if I can make $40-$45k that would be manageable. Assuming I'm driving 8-10 hours a day I'd like to confirm if all goes as planned if that is a realistic expectation.

That should be all the questions I have for a while. Thanks all!

double-quotes-start.png

Hey everyone,

Here I am again 10 years later as a remote employee of corporate America weighing truck driving again and currently unemployed. As I weigh options, I have a couple of questions for experienced drivers:

1) Roehl is advertising that the midwest regional fleet averages around $1200 per week. Is that reasonable to assume in year 1 OR is that year 2+. If so, what is a reasonable expectation for year 1?

2) I have a history of back problems and while every case is unique, I wanted to get some opinions to see if with a fairly clean diet, daily exercise if driving regionally 5 days a week is a practical consideration.

Thank you in advance for any feedback!

Andy (FKA Zen Joker)

double-quotes-end.png

$60k is totally realistic for the first year, but as others said yes it will be hard work. It definitely takes some time to get proficient at everything

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Walmart is probably the first place I'll apply once I get my physical sorted out. The smart trucking YouTube channel always advertises for GP Transco. I'll have to see if they have a terminal near me.

Unless you have 36 months of safe operation/experience, WMPF is not an option.

Depending on your location, Swift, Schneider, Smiths Transport, and US Express (others) all run Walmart Dedicated which can be a springboard to getting a job with Walmarts Private Fleet.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
Unless you have 36 months of safe operation/experience, WMPF is not an option.

Actually, the requirement is 30 months of safe tractor trailer experience within the previous four years. Just for accuracy.

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