Sick Days

Topic 32612 | Page 1

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CM59's Comment
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Always had the position that you work unless you’re dead.

I’ve been under the weather for several days and I woke up at 0300 to drive and had to call it until I got more rest. The load I’m delivering is fine arriving a little late. No one’s going to care except me.

Even if you are safe to drive, Do you take days off to rest or do you continue on the best you can?

Turtle's Comment
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What are these sick days you speak of? Never heard of such a thing. I save my time off for when I feel good.

Obviously if you feel unsafe to drive, you shouldn't.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Even if you are safe to drive, Do you take days off to rest or do you continue on the best you can?

Burnout is a genuine thing. I've done it. I think most of us have at some point.

It takes time to learn your limits, especially in trucking. It's rather stressful, and the hours are long, but you need perfect attention at all times. So it's not just a matter of "Can I continue on?" but a matter of "Can I continue on safely?"

Safety is everything. It's the only thing. It's always the first consideration. You should get the extra rest when you need it, and you should take time off regularly to get your body out of that truck and your mind off your job.

Once you learn your limits, you'll be able to schedule your runs and your time off so that you're highly productive and yet get plenty of rest at the same time. It takes time to develop that understanding of your limits and the ability to schedule your time accordingly.

Over the years, I've learned to look for activities that are quite the opposite of the work I'm doing. Right now I spend my work time at a computer doing mentally difficult and tedious work. I enjoy it, but it's quite difficult and mentally exhausting. When I'm taking a break from work, I like to go hiking in the mountains, play with our animals, or go skiing. So my fun activities are quite the opposite of what I do for a living which gives me a complete break from work and leaves me feeling refreshed and ready to go.

Get good exercise and sleep, and get out of the truck and have some fun regularly. Fun is a requirement in life if you're going to remain happy and healthy in the long run.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I had food poisoning that came up 59 miles to my second stop. After that. I parked and told dispatch to send someone for the load. Took 2 days off. Other than that I have never claimed to be sick. I do get paid sick days but never use them. When I want sleep time I just put off my availability time for the next load. Communication with dispatch is important.

CM59's Comment
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I’m sort of dealing with that now. I’ve had a mild cold for several days, nothing to worry about. I ate something yesterday that’s messed me up good on top of that.

I’ve ran before where I stop every few hours to vomit. It’s just very painful.

I had food poisoning that came up 59 miles to my second stop. After that. I parked and told dispatch to send someone for the load. Took 2 days off. Other than that I have never claimed to be sick. I do get paid sick days but never use them. When I want sleep time I just put off my availability time for the next load. Communication with dispatch is important.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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One thing about working for a mega is that there are other drivers to take over the load. My friends at smaller companies feel more pressure to run while ill. There is a difference between a cold and vomiting repeatedly. Some people want to shut down and go to bed at their first sniffle.

CM59's Comment
member avatar

Right. I need to realize these boundaries are better for me and them.

One thing about working for a mega is that there are other drivers to take over the load. My friends at smaller companies feel more pressure to run while ill. There is a difference between a cold and vomiting repeatedly. Some people want to shut down and go to bed at their first sniffle.

Xero O.'s Comment
member avatar

About 5 years ago I was sick and kept pushing through it. One morning while doing my pre-trip I ended up passing out. Got taken to the hospital and ended up staying like 5 days in the hospital with Pneumonia. So my advice is if you feel really bad go to the doctor before it gets to be too late.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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Some people want to shut down and go to bed at their first sniffle.

That's me!

IDMtnGal 's Comment
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Some people want to shut down and go to bed at their first sniffle.

That's most men. 😁😂🤣 I've seen it happen plenty when I was in the Air Force and in other jobs.

Women, especially those that have been Mothers, know how to work thru illnesses. 😉😁

That's me!

rofl-3.gif rofl-1.gif

Laura

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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