Am I Fit Enough For Flatbed Work?

Topic 32617 | Page 1

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The Pelican's Comment
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Hello excellent people!

I was looking into flatbed work. Lots of openings for it. My main concern is....could I do it?

I'm not in particularly great shape, but I am a hard worker when it comes down to it. I had a gig recently that had me running hard up and down a football field for 8 hours! By hour eight I was sore but I did it! And I don't mind taking on heavy tasks.

I just wanted y'all's insights (especially those familiar with flatbedding) on this... I'm not afraid to break a sweat and get physical, but I'm not sure if I'm cut out for it and maybe I should focus on other stuff like dry van and such.

Thank you all and stay safe!

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Why dont you just apply and get out here. Then you can decide where you want to land?

Some people takes years to investigate then never get their wings off the ground. Fly pelican, fly!

The Pelican's Comment
member avatar

Planning on it, under contract with current employer until February but I told them I'll stay on until May.

Next May I'll either be in CDL school or doing something else but likely the former. Y'all be patient, that's what I'm doing, even though I'm ready to get into it as well.

Why dont you just apply and get out here. Then you can decide where you want to land?

Some people takes years to investigate then never get their wings off the ground. Fly pelican, fly!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
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I had a gig recently that had me running hard up and down a football field for 8 hours! By hour eight I was sore but I did it!

What occupation was that???

William M.'s Comment
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Thanks for the info I will try to figure it out for more.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

How fit do you think you need to be to do flatbed work? I have met several drivers who were in their eighties who were still doing flatbed work.

I started driving flatbed when I was 53. I am almost ten years in now and still going strong. You are in your late twenties and in reasonably good health. I don't see why you would have any issues. Take a look at this thread where I tell about meeting Eugene. He is a flatbed driver in his eighties.

Trucking For The Long Haul

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I did flatbed for 8 months at my last job and loved it. I have type one diabetes and was concerned about the physicality of the work as well as it could make it difficult to manage my blood sugar. Long story short, even though I was regional I did a lot of local work with multiple tarped loads a day and I did just fine. It wasn’t nearly as difficult as I imagined it to be. Yes, it’s way more physical than pulling a box with no touch freight but the actual work itself wasn’t too strenuous.

You really just use your body weight to pull tarps off the load and folding the tarp is easy just tedious. The hardest part is picking up the tarp to put it on the trailer or on the load since the tarps are typically 80-120 lbs roughly depending on type and size, but even that isn’t bad and you spend most of your time driving anyways unless you’re local. I know there are a few tricks you can use to help get the tarps up on the trailer if you’re vertically challenged or not very strong but it mostly just gets easier as you do it. I trained my ex gf in flatbed and she’s short and wasn’t in particularly good shape when she started, and she did fine. It was a bit of a struggle for her at first but now she can hang in there with the best of them.

I will say flatbed was incredibly enjoyable and very rewarding and I highly recommend it if you enjoy some physicality in your job

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

The Pelican's Comment
member avatar

In addition to my day job, I part time as a football official at various levels.

There was a little league tournament happening, 9 games, 9 AM to 5:30 PM. I was sore afterwards! Lol

double-quotes-start.png

I had a gig recently that had me running hard up and down a football field for 8 hours! By hour eight I was sore but I did it!

double-quotes-end.png

What occupation was that???

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