Just Got A Wicked Awesome Job Offer!

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Daniel B.'s Comment
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Two years of hard work dealing with all those frustrations, customers, 4-wheelers, and everything else we truckers go through. I just got a job offer that is pretty awesome. Tell me what you think TT.

My wife works at Radioshack, as a customer came in, somehow the conversation was about trucking. He revealed to her that he his a president and ceo of a small company. He said he could use another driver and gave my wife his business card.

I did some research on this company, its called Gary Martin Trucking. Small company consisting of 7 trucks.

Gary is a veteran trucker with 3.4 million accident free miles. He has been hauling for FedEx ground for 14 years! His company pulls doubles for FedEx!

I spoke with him on the phone twice now and here's what he offers.

They pull from hub to hub. No customers, just drop and hooks at FedEx terminals. There is no more dealing with anyone else. There should be no waiting for a load unless the facility screws up. Kinda what Guyjax is doing.

Obviously, he wants to make sure that whoever he hands his keys to is a perfectly safe driver. So there's a training period in the beginning. Gary and I will be team driving. He will make sure I am a good driver and teach me how to pull doubles as well as working the dolly. There is no set training period, I will be done when both he and I feel comfortable with my abilities. The pay during training is .44cpm split. I will be home for two days every week during training.

When I go solo I will be doing the same thing. I will have two days off per week and the miles are estimated to be around 2500. Its likely that I might be able to stop by the house occasionally for the evening. Solo pay starts at .42cpm.

He offers benefits and is willing to let me have certain days off for special events.

The good:

While it is a pay decrease, he pays a lot more than any other job I was interested in. Heck, Indian River pulls liquid tankers and they were going to start me off at .37cpm!!!

Home weekly for two days.

This company isn't broke. Their revenue in 2010 was 2million and they only had four trucks.

Mostly day-time driving. He personally hates night driving so he makes every attempt to keep his drivers on the day-time schedule.

Pulling doubles for FedEx is a huge accomplishment for someone my age.

The bad:

He doesn't have an extra truck for me just yet but he said he will in about a month because he ordered three more trucks to his fleet.

I'll have to team drive at the start but you gotta do what you gotta do right?

Its right before winter, not the best time to be learning how to drive doubles.

We only have one car right now. So sometimes I might need to ask for a ride if my wife is working. We're still saving up for a car. I told him this and he said "we'll figure something out." Whatever that means...

He was really impressed with me that I was an Instructor/Trainer and that I had won the Company Driver of the Month award from Prime. These two things made him go from kinda wanting me to really wanting me.

So what do you guys think? I'm excited but as always, I take my time with my decisions.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Woody's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Thanks for the info everyone.

So would you guys say that even though the pay is on the low end, it's still worth it because it's not night time driving?

That's a tough one to answer with several variables.

You would have to look at what other options might be available in your area. Then look at the difference in pay and decide if the lower pay would be worth day driving. And as you know its not just the CPM. I personally would prefer days but would be hard pressed to find something that would pay enough to make me switch. In my case Old Dominion runs near me and pays more CPM but I do not know if they pay virtually all down time like my current gig. And would also have to look at the benefits package. Granted I would not be able to go straight to days with OD but you get the idea. You also would not be fighting any seniority joining the smaller company, which several of the linehaul companies follow even non union outfits.

So to make that comparison you need to figure out what day driving is worth to you. It may mean a lot or it could actually be a disadvantage.

Daytime means a lot more traffic so slower runs. Depending on how he is set up and how quick they can get you moving again this could even mean an extra trip or two per week if your in congested areas.

Always driving at night can effect your mood. I forget the actual name for it but in some people not getting enough sunlight can cause varying degrees of depression. My wife used to struggle with this and we actually bought an extremely bright light designed for light therapy. It helped.

At night you can't see the scenery. For me this is actually something I would consider but I was only OTR for 4 months so didn't see that much of the country. On the other hand in the relative short time you have been trucking you covered a LOT of miles and country so this may not be a big deal for you. And doing linehaul type work you wont venture nearly as far from home anyway.

One of the biggest factors may actually be your sleep schedule. Driving nights you may have to flip your sleep schedule around every time your off to be able to enjoy time with your wife. And on the day you go back you need to take a nap during the day to prepare for your drive which essentially cuts that day short. Driving days you may need to go to bed early to get up early but that is something you already do so may not be a change to your schedule. Believe me flipping back and forth can really get ya screwed up, sometimes I have trouble getting to sleep.

Just as a guess I would say your to biggest decisions is to avoid traffic or have a more predictable sleep schedule when determining the value of driving during the day. Then apply that value to the potential difference in pay.

Woody

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Daniel if I were in your position these are the thing I would consider. You know FedEx runs their contract drivers so loads will not be an issue. Even if the pay would be a bit lower what are you giving up to gain this job. Compare each point against each other. Miles, pay, benefits and home time. We all know there is no perfect company out there but search inside yourself and your home life and see what you are needing at this stage in your career. Different driving jobs offer different things for different people.

Is it more miles for less pay? How are the benefits compared to what you have right now. How will the home time actually work? I know you are being told how it's supposed to be but is that how it actually is? Have you tried to talk to current drivers? I know your currently driving but that maybe tough to do. Maybe a company website that goes into more details.

Trucking is an adventure. If you take the job then good. If it does not work out I am betting you could go back to Prime or another company of your choosing. Is there enough pros that it might be worth a try?

Good luck on whatever you decide.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Woody's Comment
member avatar

Thats great Daniel, you work hard and you deserve it!

Since you are asking for opinions I would just say you may want to check other LTL companies before you commit. Believe me bro I am not trying to hamper your excitement by any means. And I have no idea what pay is like out where you live. But the CPM seams a little low compared to what linehaul drivers typically make.

I am probably on the lower end of what linehaul makes as far as CPM since Im at about .44 but will be getting a 5% raise per year for three years and will be over .50 at that point. But I also work for a union company so virtually all my time except for breaks is paid when Im working but detained. Getting detained at hubs happens much less often in linehaul but it does happen so it may be something to check into.

Since its his company your actually working for but pulling FedEX trailers are they still on such a tight timed run? We all see how most FedEx drivers drive in bad weather and they always say its because they are on timed runs. I know you wouldnt do anything unsafe but I would ask how things are handled.

One big advantage you would have compared to other LTL is him only having 7 drivers. From what I understand many of the LTL companies work off a seniority list, even the ones that are not union. So that may keep you moving a little easier.

Does he run day cabs or sleepers? Are his trucks double axle or single? I can tell you pulling doubles can get real fishy sometimes with a single axle truck lol. I'm NOT looking forward to that this winter!!!

Man I am really excited for you. Your wife would love how often you can get home driving linehaul.

Woody

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

Heck yea sir! I would say that anything to do with fed ex whether it's directly or indirectly would be awesome! You get a chance to learn doubles which can only add value to your already impressive resume. And you get to see your wife more. I'm not sure what there really is to think about. In gonna give it the old "git r dun"!

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

MRC's Comment
member avatar

HEELLLLLLL YAAAAA! Impressive!! I am totally surprised that he/ you didn't talk about what you would like in the new truck. Go For It!!!smile.gif

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys. Woody, you make great points and I'll have even more questions for him tomorrow!

Tony E.'s Comment
member avatar

Well sounds like a good option Daniel ..I know from ur many posts on here you will make a well thought out informed decision... Congrats on the offer hope it all works out in your favor

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

You and I talked about this the other day, so you know what my answer is.

Just like for myself, you need to do what is best for you and your family. Just consider, money is not everything, keep that in mind.

Ernie

Brian 's Comment
member avatar

Hey Daniel, not sure about in your area but here in Minnesota the fed ex recruiters are coming to our school every 2 weeks looking for drivers, I haven't been available when they have been giving their presentation (out driving) but if your looking for that type of change....maybe give them a call directly? They are looking for hub to hub long haul drivers here, maybe elsewhere too, and possibly better pay & benefits......

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Very cool Daniel! It will be nice running next to FedEx trailers without having to worry about being trailer slapped! smile.gif

mountain girl's Comment
member avatar

Hey Daniel! Congratulations! I think Woody makes a lot of good points so just go into this informed. Daytime linehaul is primo and in the big companies, takes a very long time to get seniority for.

Pulling doubles , in my limited experience, is still a bit easier than a 53-footer with a sleeper berth. You'll be amazed at how narrow your turns can be. I guess instructors at my last company somehow didn't appreciate it when I called the doubles sets "cute." Hmm. Wonder why ...

Backing a single pup takes some getting used to, as your corrections don't take that full 17 feet to happen. They are more like short, small adjustments on the wheel but I think, once you get used to them, pups are totally fun. Totally fun.

Two key points in pulling doubles: 1) heaviest trailer up front and 2) don't watch them in the mirror.

Just on instinct alone: it sounds like working for this guy could be really, really cool considering he's already said things like, "We'll figure it out." It sounds like this could truly be a family-friendly or husband/wife-friendly situation. To me, that's what makes for quality of life and no amount of money makes up for a poor quality of life. You've paid your dues.

Oh, yeah. Before I forget: Don't be surprised if being home more often has its adjustments too. It's better, but not always perfect - so give it time. Your wife has probably grown very independent, running things without you. Be patient with one another ...just a tip from someone who's had that kind of experience.

Congratulations, Dude!

-mountain girl

smile.gif

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

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